Following the counsel of Governor Herbert and under the direction of Mayor Kaufusi, Provo City Library will be closed until further notice. If you have materials checked out, please hold onto them until we reopen. No fines will accrue during this time.
Following the counsel of Governor Herbert and under the direction of Mayor Kaufusi, Provo City Library will be closed until further notice. If you have materials checked out, please hold onto them until we reopen. No fines will accrue during this time.
 

 

Learn It

  • August Learn It 01

    Whew! If you’ve been in the library in June and July, you know that we were going full-steam ahead with our summer reading program. Just on the Teen and Adult Reference side, we watched movies, swapped books, had fun at trivia nights, locked the teens in the library for a night, and met some of our favorite authors. Now that August is here, we’ve cut back on some of the activities here at the library, but that doesn’t mean that we’ve all gone on vacation.  Here are four adult-focused programs we’ve got going on at the library in August.

    Yoga @ the Library
    Wednesday, August 2nd, 7:00 pm
    West Lawn

    We host yoga at the library the first Wednesday of every month, but we’ll try to maximize the summer by hosting this session out on the lawn.

    Learn It: Mindfulness 101
    Monday, August 21, 7:00 pm
    Shaw Programming Room, #260

    This repeat of a class we held in June focuses on breathing and meditation and learning about its physical and psychological benefits.

    Learn It: Canning and Food Preservation
    Wednesday, August 29th, 7:00 pm
    Shaw Programming Room, #260

    It’s canning season! Learn about food preservation safety and traditional boiling water bath canning. By next winter you will be enjoying the bottled fruits of your labors!

    Teaching Children in a Digital World
    Thursday, August 31st, 7:00 pm
    Shaw Programming Room, #260

    With a new school year starting up, learn tips for talking about computer safety with your children. Learn about different Internet filters and how they are used. Learn more about online privacy and how to protect your information. 

  • BOP FB event

    Have you ever heard of a Eurasian eagle-owl? If you haven’t, stop what you are doing and go watch a video of this creature. These owls are the largest owl species in the world and are an apex predator in their neck of the woods. They can have a 6ft wingspan and can hunt and kill small deer. That is a serious raptor!

    The first time I learned about the Eurasian eagle-owl was at a bird show put on by Jim Fowers, founder of the Rocky Mountain Bird Rescue. Jim and his assistant were showing off a Eurasian eagle-owl that they take care of at their facility. Jim also has a number of other birds in his care, including owls, hawks, and falcons. The great news is that you can see these birds in person at the library.

    Jim and his assistants will be coming to the Provo City Library on May 22 at 7:00 pm in the Young Special Events Room #201. Come see these birds in life and learn some amazing facts about each of them. You will also be able to learn about conservation, falconry, and the rehabilitation process for raptors. There may even be a flight demonstration. In any case, this is one Learn It event you will not want to miss!

    This is just a little taste of what the library has to offer on raptors. Check out these titles and more in the nonfiction section.

    5.20 OwlsOWLS OF THE WORLD
    by James R. Duncan
    (2016)

    This lavishly illustrated and entertaining book explores many aspects of owls. With a chapter dedicated to each owl family, from the huge eagle owls to the diminutive pygmy owls and owlets, this book will engage people new to the subject as well as those already familiar with the species.

     

    5.21 RaptorsRAPTORS OF NORTH AMERICA: NATURAL HISTORY AND CONSERVATION
    by Noel Snyder
    (2006)

    Did you know that raptors are a key species in maintaining balance in an ecosystem? In this book, you will learn all about different raptors in North America and their importance to other species in their habitats. If our Birds of Prey event piqued your interest in conservation, this is a great book to learn more.

     
  • healthy relationships

    When I was growing up I dreamed about falling in love, getting married and living happily ever after. I did eventually meet my prince charming, got married and then realized that the happily ever after part took a lot more work than I first thought. Don’t get me wrong, being married is wonderful, but after 18 years I’ve learned that to have a loving relationship that can weather the storms of life, you have to actually put a lot of work into it.

    With Valentine’s Day right around the corner, it is a good time to think about the relationship you have or the one you hope to have someday. We have a great Learn It class coming up in February that will help teach some skills to improve your relationship.

    I’m really excited for our Learn It class on Wednesday, February 7, 2018 from 7pm-8pm in the Shaw Programming Room (Room 260). Nevin G. Alderman, MA, CMHC, a relationship specialist will teach an hour-long class called Renew Love. In this class he will cover:

    • How to identify and avoid common relational pitfalls
    • Strategies to increase love, connection, and fulfillment
    • Tools for improved communication and conflict-resolution

    This would be a great opportunity for a free date night!

    If you can’t make it to the class, we have some great resources here in the library to help improve relationships. Here are a few of my favorite talks on CD and one audio book. Sometimes it’s nice to listen to short talks together and then be able to discuss the things you’ve learned.

    AN ENDURING LOVE: FEEDING THE 7 BASIC NEEDS OF YOUR ETERNAL RELATIONSHIP
    Matt Townsend
    (2015)

    Dr. Matt Townsend is a relationship coach and communications expert. He uses the acronym STARVED to help couples look at the seven basic needs that are vital to a healthy relationship. Most relationships are lacking in one or more of these areas, but he teaches how to feed a STARVED relationship and get back on the right path. 

    FOR ALL ETERNITY: A FOUR-TALK SET TO STRENGTHEN YOUR MARRIAGE
    John L. Lund
    (2003)

    Dr. Lund gives four different talks covering the topics of owning our words and behaviors, learning the love languages of others, conflict resolution skills, and apologies and forgiveness. These are great to listen to over and over again. The part on the different communication styles is really helpful. When you get married, you don’t always realize that the person you are married to may have come from a family that communicates very differently than you. Understanding content communication can really help a lot of relationships. 

    I LOVE YOU: SIX TALKS TO STRENGTHEN YOUR MARRIAGE
    John L. Lund, Douglas E. Brinley; Charles Beckert; Lucile Johnson; Bill and Chris Marshall
    (2009)

    This collection of six complete talks by popular LDS speakers provides proven ways to overcome many of the common challenges in marriage. 

    LOVE ONE ANOTHER: A FOUR-TALK SET TO STRENGTHEN YOUR RELATIONSHIPS
    John L. Lund
    (2005)

    In this talk set, Dr. Lund shares his knowledge on how to improve ourselves and our relationships. He uses humor and examples to make many important points. He mostly teaches to focus on the things that are within our control. 

    THE SEVEN PRINCIPLES FOR MAKING MARRIAGE WORK
    John M. Gottman
    (2015)
    Audio book available from Overdrive

    John Gottman has been studying couples for years. This book shares his findings on what makes some marriages work, while others fail. Once you understand the seven principles, you can start using the strategies he shares to more effectively resolve any problem in the relationship.

  • Learn It hair blog

    I have always struggled with fixing hair. Over the years, I mastered the basic pony tail and called it good. Now I have two daughters and my hair styling skills are lacking. I look around at all the adorable hairstyles and wish I could learn some tips and tricks to make it easier.

    I’m really excited about our Learn It class on Tuesday, September 19th at 7:00 pm in the Shaw Programming Room. It is Hair 101 and will be taught by students from Paul Mitchell The School in Provo. They will teach us some hands-on braiding techniques and answer general hair care questions. I can’t wait to learn some new or better ways to braid hair. If you are like me and struggle with hair styling, or maybe you already know a lot, but are looking for something new, you should come to our Learn It class on September 19th. 

    If you can’t make it to the class, there are also some great books here in the library. I’ve found a few books that have helped me feel a little braver to try some other styles.

    9.18 Amazing HairstylesAMAZING HAIRSTYLES FROM EASY TO ELEGANT
    By Becky Porter
    (2014) 

    This book has great color pictures that show the hair style from different angels and then a picture for each step, with really easy to understand instructions. One of the other things I love about this book is that each section is color coded, so it’s easy to find. On the first page of the section it has a page with every hairstyle in that section with it’s name and what page you can find it on. It saved me a ton of time to flip to the overview and then straight to the style I was interested in.  

    9.18 HairstyledHAIRSTYLED
    By Anne Thoumieux
    (2016) 

    This book has colored photos with steps and instructions, but I found them a little more confusing than the previous book. Also, there weren’t many styles that I could actually see myself using. It did have specific styles for different types and lengths of hair so it wasn’t just all things that needed long hair to do.

     

    9.18 DIY Updos Knots and TwistsDIY UPDOS, KNOTS, & TWISTS
    By Melissa Cook
    (2015) 

    This book was great because the pictures show steps of the women fixing their own hair which is helpful because I don’t have a stylist at home to do cute things to my hair when I’m trying to get ready for the day. This helped me to see where my hands should be and how I should hold each strand of hair and also where I needed to put the bobby pins.  

     

    I look forward to trying some of these new styles, now I just have to hope that my daughters will sit still long enough for me to figure them out.  

  • youtube

    I spend far more time on YouTube than I probably should, but it’s easy to get sucked in. I watch to learn, to be entertained, to live vicariously, and to satisfy curiosity.

    After being a viewer for so long, one day I thought, I can do that! I can make YouTube videos! I’ve dabbled in videos related to librarianship, and then started dabbling in vlogging. Since my family lives 1000 miles away, I thought it would be fun for them to see what I’m up to when they can’t see me in person.

    My mom enjoys my videos… because she’s my mom. In all honesty, I’m a terrible vlogger. I feel like I never turn the camera on at the right time, I’m stiff and awkward when I talk, my videos aren’t cohesive, and frankly I don’t even want to watch them.

    But I persist… because it’s kind of fun to make something (even if it’s terrible) for my family. So I might as well learn and improve, right?

    A couple years ago I discovered the 8 Passengers YouTube channel. They are a local family documenting their daily life by posting videos to YouTube. In just three short years they have amassed nearly 1.5 million subscribers, and their daily videos often get 200k-500k views.

    How is it that I can spend an entire week trying to find things to film (and hopefully remember to turn on the camera), but they can make something like an average trip to the grocery store interesting enough that I eagerly tune in every morning?

    I must know their secrets!

    So I invited Ruby, the main vlogger and editor of 8 Passengers, to come and share what she’s learned. How does she manage to make an average day become an interesting video? What are things she’s done to engage their audience and keep people coming back? What has she learned about tagging videos to make them more findable so that they can reach new viewers?

    If you or someone you know is interested in making videos for YouTube, join us on Thursday, April 26th in the Shaw Programming room for Learn It @ Your Library: Create for YouTube where we will learn tips and tricks from a creator who’s already doing it successfully.

    I’m ready to take my videos to the next level, are you?

  • NaNo FB 2016

     

    NaNoWriMo.  No, I didn’t just swear, and I didn’t just completely butcher the Batman theme song.  NaNoWriMo is an abbreviation for National Novel Writers Month, which happens every November.

    Of course, here at the Provo City Library we love novels, and I hope you know that we love the people who write them.  Because of that, we’ve paired up with the Utah Valley Writers group to host a few NaNoWriMo events this month.  Come with your creative juices flowing, and use the Provo City Library as a space to work on the novel you’ve always wanted to write.

    On November 12th and 19th, we’ll be in the second floor computer lab for a series of activities, prompts, word sprints, and enthusiastic cheers to help you on your way.  All events will be held from 2:00 pm to 6:00 pm.

    But what if you've already written a novel and are trying to figure out what to do next?  Come to Indie Author Day on Wednesday, November 16th, at 7:00 pm.  Indie Author Day is another national program designed to help people figure out how to get their books published.  We’ll start by watching a webinar hosted by leaders in the publishing industry.  Then we’ll open the night up for questions with local author Elana Johnson.

    Elana Johnson considers herself to be a “hybrid author,” with books published traditionally by Simon & Schuster and Start Media. She has self-published under her own name and a pen name, Liz Isaacson. She is also a Kindle Press/Amazon author. So however you’re thinking of getting your work out there, Elana will have some great advice how to get the job done.

    Hopefully I see you at one of these great events.  Happy NaNoWriMo, Everyone!

  • life events learn it

    2011: The Year My Car Slowly Died. At least, that’s what it’s titled in my head. A lot of other things happened around then (I had just moved to Colorado), but the unifying theme of the last half of the year was my car trouble. In September I was driving home from work and my car started shuddering and refused to accelerate. In October, I found myself stranded on the side of the freeway in downtown Denver during rush hour. In November, the steering fluid line burst. In December, a complete stranger and I slowly pushed my car out of the way of oncoming traffic on Christmas Eve.

    I had always heard that it was important to have a rainy day fund, but until The Year My Car Slowly Died, even though money had been tight, I managed to pull through. Suddenly, I was looking at money in an entirely new light.  I had a car that was slowly dying, but I didn’t think I could afford a new one because all of the repairs left me penniless. How could I take on a new car payment, and somehow also build up a savings account?

    This story is mild compared to things that happen to people every day. I’ve possibly just given you flashbacks to a time when money was too tight. If you’re in a panic now, don’t worry. On March 14th, 21st, and 28th we will be having a series of Learn It at Your Library classes called Preparing for Life Events: Women and Money. The aim is to give women the knowledge and skills needed to conquer challenges like the one mentioned above. The classes will cover topics like:

    • Financial Empowerment
    • Preparing For Life Events
      • Death
      • Loss of Job
      • Children Divorce
      • Inheritance/Legacy
    • Increasing Social and Financial Equity
    • Avoiding Financial Pitfalls.

    The classes will be taught by Kristy Hanson, an family lawyer with MHM Law Offices; and Roy Alame, a wealth advisor with Merrill Lynch.

    If you want to learn more about ways to empower the women in your life, come to the class. Give this year a much better title than the one I gave to 2011. Maybe this year can be The Year I Conquered My Finances.

  • yoga

    Yoga? At the library? Aren’t librararies just about books?

    Reading stretches your mind; it’s an excellent way to explore new ideas and realize who you really are in relation to those characters and ideas. Yoga likewise teaches you about yourself as you move through a sequence. Though you may think of it as merely a series of stretches, the moving mediation of yoga invites a stillness of the mind while the body is challenged in stretches and flowing movement. Attention to breath brings an awareness to the body and allows participants to connect with those around them. While doing the sequences together a greater sense of one’s purpose in life and purpose in the community can be revealed. During and after a yoga class you feel an overall sense of gratitude. You are thankful for your body, the exercise, the place it was taught, and your yoga teacher, and you go away with a kinder more positive outlook on life. 

    Yoga at the library welcomes everyone. It’s not about how flexible you are. In fact that is one of the purposes of yoga: to progress in your flexibility and movement. You absolutely don’t have to be bendy to begin a practice. You can come no matter your experience level in yoga. We have pregnant women, college students, moms with their kids, couples on a date, veteran yogis and first timers. While the library is not a health club offering fitness classes, we are an institution that strives to better individuals, families and the community; offering free monthly yoga classes helps fulfill that mission.

    Yoga at the Library is part of our Learn It @ Your Library series. Other topics in this series include Hair 101, how to buy a house, how to use credit card points and miles, bicycle care, emergency preparedness, sewing, writing workshops, parents talking to their kids, and so many more. Learn Its are always FREE. They are open to the public, so you don’t have to have a library card. Invite friends and then when they are here they can get a library card too! Yoga is held monthly on the first Wednesday of every month at 7pm in the Bullock room #309. 

    Hope to see you all at yoga next month! Namaste! If you’re interested in other free yoga classes around the community, Yoga Recyled has got you covered:   

    Yoga @ the Library was on the local news! Check out the clip here