Graphic Novels

  • yang

     

    On Friday, September 16 we kicked off our first ever, annual Graphic Novel Festival: Get Graphic. Our keynote speaker, Gene Luen Yang, comic book author and the National Ambassador for Young People’s Literature (appointed by the Library of Congress, Every Child A Reader, and the Children’s Book Council), explained the educational value of comic books. 

    As the son of immigrant parents, Yang says he grew up in a house full of stories.

    “Immigrant parents tells stories to their children as a way of connecting them to the culture that they left,” says Yang. “I grew up telling stories, and I also grew up drawing.”

    As a child, Yang fell in love with cartoons because they proved that you could use drawings to tell a story. He dreamed of one day becoming a Disney animator. When Yang discovered a Marvel comic book, that all changed and soon he grew from comic book reader to comic book creator.

    yang2

    “One of my favorite things about comic books is that the dividing line between who’s a fan and who’s a creator is really thin,” says Yang. “If you want to become a comic book creator all you need are some pens, some paper and maybe like a healthy ignorance of your own artistic limitations.”

    Even though Yang’s been creating comics for a long time, he’s only been at it full time for about a year and a half. Before that, he was also a high school teacher, and he would bring up comics with his students hoping to seem cool—it didn’t work. As a high school teacher, he often felt like Batman, living with two separate identities, keeping his comic and his teaching life separate. 

    However, comics began to take on a more pivotal role in his life when one day he needed a substitute teacher. His first solution was to videotape lectures, which he describes as an utter disaster.

    “Mr. Yang we thought you were boring in person, but on video, you are just unbearable,” said his students.  

    In a desperate second attempt, Yang drew his lectures as comics. To his surprise, they were a hit and a preferred means to Yang in person. 

    yang3

    Surprised that a generation that grew up with screens would prefer reading lectures on a page over a screen, he looked into why comics were working. 

    He found that comics in the classroom was not such a novel idea. Comics have been used all over the world for nearly a century in classrooms all around the world. He realized that comics as a single, unified, multimedia experience give the reader complete control of information transfer rather than the creator. 

    “When I was giving them the comic lectures it was like I was giving them a remote control. If they didn’t understand something in my lecture, they could just read it again, or go more slowly. If I was talking about something they already understood, they could skip over it,” says Yang. “That’s only true of comics. That’s the only visual narrative medium that has that quality.”

    Comics have as much a place in the classroom as a book because, for many reluctant readers, comics lead to a love of reading.  

    After addressing this audience of parents and educators, Yang signed books; on Saturday, he offered a keynote address especially for those hoping to make comics. Look for that recap next week!

  • BB 2017 FB

    2017 was a great year for YA books, as will be evident on February 20th, when we present our fifty favorite Young Adult books of 2017 in the Brimhall room, #302 at 7:00 pm.  As book lovers, we’ve been agonizing over which books published in 2017 really are the best.  To whet your appetites for February 20th, and as an excuse to sneak in a few more book recommendations, here are a few (almost equally amazing) books that didn’t make the cut.

    2.13 Batman I Am GothamBATMAN: I AM GOTHAM
    By Tom King

    This graphic novel, and the subsequent series, serves as an excellent examination of the Batman character and his motivations and flaws. The novel introduces new characters who help Batman save Gotham and may allow him to give up crime fighting for good! The artwork is fantastic, the new characters are deep and sympathetic, and the action is exciting, which makes it a great addition to the Batman mythos.  We’re reviewing a few other superhero graphic novels at Best Books, so unfortunately Batman won’t get his well-deserved shout-out.

     

    2.13 The Names They Give UsTHE NAMES THEY GAVE US
    By Emery Lord

    When her perfectly planned summer of quality time with her parents, her serious boyfriend, and her Bible camp unravels and long-hidden family secrets emerge, Lucy must figure out what she is made of and what grace really means.  I really liked the way this book touched on issues like questioning faith and having a great support system when tough times come.  In the end, I liked a few other books a little bit more, so this one didn’t make the cut.

     

    12.13 Song of the CurrentSONG OF THE CURRENT
    By Sarah Tolcser

    Caroline Oresteia is destined for the river. Her father is a wherryman, as was her grandmother. All Caro needs is for the river god to whisper her name, and her fate is sealed. When her father is arrested, Caro volunteers to transport mysterious cargo in exchange for his release. Secretly, Caro hopes that by piloting her own wherry, the river god will finally speak her name. This book has a great story, interesting characters who learn and grow, and a dash of magic.  The only thing keeping me from recommending this book is that I felt like I needed to highlight books from other genres a little bit more.

     

    2.13 The WoodTHE WOOD
    By Chelsea Bobulski

    Winter has grown up with her father, who is the guardian of a magical wood where thresholds to other places and times open, and occasionally people wander through. Then Winter’s father disappears, and a boy from the 1700s refuses to return to his time. He claims to have information that could help Winter find her father, but how can anyone from hundreds of years earlier know about her father? I got this recommendation from a co-worker who reads a lot of YA, but who wasn’t part of the Best Books team.  Since no one on the team read the book, it won’t be spotlighted at the event, but I thought everyone should know about it just the same. 

     
  •  DC

     

    Like superheroes? Enjoyed the Marvel movies or the DARK KNIGHT trilogy? Have The Flash queued up on Netflix? Then I have some big news for you. DC—one of the big two comic companies and home of Superman and the Justice League—is about to change everything. Though they keep saying that it’s not a reboot, DC is going through a renaissance and they’re calling it (appropriately) “Rebirth.”

    Those familiar with comics know that only five years ago DC DID have a reboot. They pared down their myriad titles to a mere half a hundred, started them all over at #1, and called it “The New 52.” More than just the number changed; instead of continuing any of the existing storylines, DC tried for a complete reset, wiping away all the alternate universes, the time travel, and the deaths and restoring all the heroes to their Silver Age prime. Essentially they dropped all the “baggage” and tried to create a simpler, grittier timeline to attract new readers.

    While this theoretically sounds like a good idea, it didn’t work. To start with, company politics resulted in bad author-series pairings. Obscure titles like SWAMP THING were foisted onto award winning writers and artists, while JUSTICE LEAGUE languished in the hands of newcomers. More vitally, however, DC discovered that when you tear away all the history of a character—their losses, their triumphs, their friendships and rivalries—you tear away most of their personality as well. The New 52 superheroes felt bland, dated, and pointlessly gritty. Coming from a girl whose favorite comic writer is Alan Moore, I can say that there’s definitely a time and a place for grit. But there’s got to be something deep and powerful to back it up. When the Joker beat Robin to death with a crowbar in THE KILLING JOKE, there was a REASON for Batman to be dark, violent and brooding. When that history was wiped away by New 52, Batman just seemed melodramatic.

    That’s not to say it was all bad. I personally loved New 52’s AQUAMAN, and WONDER WOMAN was a fortuitous mix of creative art and good writing. But the good stuff wasn’t enough. Not only did New 52 fail to attract new readers, it also lost decades of loyal fans. So it isn’t entirely surprising that, five years later, they’re trying something different. Though “not a reboot” (probably because the last one went so poorly) Rebirth plans to start all its series over again at #1 and reinstate all the canon that was lost in New 52.

    DC Rebirth

    To start it all off, DC has published a big, game-changing cross-over comic titled “DC Universe: Rebirth.” It takes the form of an 80 page one-shot that’s supposed to have the impact that CRISIS ON INFINITE EARTHS had in the eighties. Not to give too many spoilers, it starts with the reappearance of Wally West (aka Kid Flash), one of the many characters excluded from The New 52. He breaks into the New 52 universe (using the speed force, how else) to warn Flash and the other members of the Justice League that they’ve been toyed with. That 10 years of their life and memories have been stolen by Doctor Manhattan (from WATCHMEN), reducing them from their mature, legendary status to new heroes again.

    So we see the mechanism by which all the old history is going to be brought back. It’s important to note, however, that DC isn’t completely disregarding everything that happened in New 52. All of that will remain in-canon, just added onto all the old stuff. So it’s going to be messy, but as we’ve learned from the past, sometimes messy can be good.

    Have I caught your interest? Ready to read? Our library will be purchasing DC Universe: Rebirth Special to get you started. Anything beyond that, though, is up in the air. If you have a hero you like and you’re excited to see what they’re up to post-Rebirth, let us know! Our purchaser is much more likely to get a particular title if he knows someone wants to read it. I’m excited to get to read what you guys request and I’m crossing my fingers for how this turns out. Hopefully second time’s the charm for DC.

  • k pop books

    In a previous Friday Faves, I listed my favorite K-pop CDs, but this time I want to highlight some of the books that I picked up simply because of my love for K-pop and Korean culture. I’m not saying these are the best out there (there’s a LOT I haven’t read yet), but these are ones that I enjoyed simply because… well… Korea! If you’ve got some favorite books that are about Korea or take place there, leave a comment so that I know what to read next! 

    8.4 The Birth of Korean CoolTHE BIRTH OF KOREAN COOL
    By Euny Hong
    (2014)

    Going from a third-world to first-world country in a matter of a few short decades is no simple task, but South Korea managed it, and is now becoming one of the world’s top exporters of pop culture. Euny Hong describes her experience of moving to Korea when she was twelve in the 1980s and how she’s seen the country go from very un-cool, to ultra-cool in that time. This was a fascinating read to see how the country essentially rebranded itself. 

     

     

    8.4 K Pop NowK-POP NOW!
    By Mark James Russell
    (2014)

    There are a wide variety of factors that have contributed to the development and growing popularity of K-pop. Russell provides a broad overview that includes historical and cultural influences, as well as describing what makes the industry unique and different from Western music. From there, Russell provides overviews of some of the current hottest artists in boy groups, girl groups, and solo acts, then briefly ventures onto the future of k-pop and what to expect when traveling to South Korea. 

    8.4 Bride of the Water GodBRIDE OF THE WATER GOD
    by Mi-Kyung Yun
    (2007)

    In this manhwa, Soah’s village is suffering from a long drought. To appease Habaek, the water god, they must sacrifice a girl to be his bride. When Soah is chosen, she understands she will likely die. However, there is something unique about her, and Habaek decides to rescue her. As she adjusts to live in Habaek’s kingdom, she discovers that there are a lot of mysterious things going on, including some that surround her new husband. This is a beautifully drawn manhwa that will be made into a K-drama later this year. 

     

    8.4 RE JaneRE JANE
    By Patricia Park
    (2015)

    In this modern retelling of Jane Eyre, Jane Re is a half-Korean, half-American orphan who grew up in New York. She doesn’t quite fit in and becomes desperate to get away from her Uncle’s strict rules. Jane finds a job working as an au pair for two Brooklyn academics and their daughter, which presents its own unique problems and opportunities. When her grandfather passes away, a quick trip to Seoul for the funeral turns into an extended stay as she reconnects with family and discovers a modern Korea, completely different from the one her uncle left decades earlier.  

     

    8.4 Stars of K Pop GirlsSTARS OF K-POP: GIRLS
    By StarNews
    (2014)

    Through photographs, interviews, and statistics, this book highlights some of the biggest girl groups in the k-pop industry. Girls’ Generation, 2NE1, Kara, f(x), Secret, Sistar, 4minute, T-ara, Miss A, Brown Eyed Girls, Afterschool, Girl’s Day, A Pink, Rainbow, and Crayon Pop are all highlighted with individual member information and tons of pictures. This book is a visual feast for the k-pop fan.

     

     

    8.4 Stars of K Pop BoysSTARS OF K-POP: BOYS
    By StarNews
    (2014)

    Very similar to its above counterpart, this edition of STARS OF K-POP focuses on male idols and groups including Psy, TVXQ, Big Bang, Super Junior, Beast, SHINee, Infinite, 2PM, 2AM, CNBLUE, ZE:A, F.T. Island, MBLAQ, EXO, and Supernova.

     

     

  • graphic memoirs 01

     

    I didn’t grow up reading comic books or comic strips in the Sunday paper, but when I picked up my first graphic novel a few years ago I was hooked! I like that graphic novels tell a story through words and images – similar to comic books – but I love that the stories are contained to one publication rather than multiple issues. Within the graphic novel genre, I’ve found that I particularly enjoy graphic memoirs. It is so interesting to read about an author’s life, and to see their emotions in a way that words sometimes just can’t match. So whether you’re just getting into the graphic novel genre, you’ve read them all your life, or you just like good books about fascinating people here is a list of my five favorite graphic memoirs!

     

    MausMAUS
    by Art Spiegelman
    (1991)

    MAUS was one of the first graphic novels I read, and I absolutely loved it! Art Spigelman tells his father’s story of imprisonment in a Nazi concentration camp. At the same time, Spiegelman tells his own life story which bears the marks of his father’s emotion burdens. This Pulitzer Prize winning graphic memoir was one of the first of its kind, and it is an absolute must read!

     

     

    PersepolisTHE COMPLETE PERSEPOLIS
    by Marjane Satrapi
    (2007)

    In PERSEPOLIS, Marjane Satrapi describes growing up in Tehran in the 1980s during the Islamic Revolution. While Satrapi describes the upheaval of living in a war torn country, she also tells her own coming of age story through universal challenges that girls from any country can relate to. I think this is such a great book because Satrapi gives readers a unique and intimate look at life in a region that most know little about.

     

     

    VietnamericaVIETNAMERICA: A FAMILY’S JOURNEY
    by G. B. Tran
    (2010)

    Tran is the son of Vietnamese immigrants who came to America during the fall of Saigon. Tran’s memoir focuses on his family’s trip back to Vietnam many years later and all that he learns about his parents, his ancestors, and the effects of the Vietnam War. If I ever wrote a memoir, I’d want it to be something like this! I love Tran’s story; it is fascinating and the art is beautiful!

     

     

    RelishRELISH: MY LIFE IN THE KITCHEN
    by Lucy Kinsley
    (2013)

    Most of the books on my list deal with heavy topics, but Kinsley’s RELISH is just pure fun. Raised by a chef, food has always been important to Kinsley, and in her memoir she shares stories from her adolescence that have a significant tie to food. This is a great book, and I especially enjoyed the illustrated recipes included at the end of each chapter. Her chocolate chip cookie recipe is fantastic!

     

     

    American WidowAMERICAN WIDOW
    by Alissa Torres
    (2008)

    Eddie Torres started working in the North Tower of the World Trade Center on September 10th, 2001. The next morning he and three thousand others were killed in a terrorist attack. At the time, Eddie’s wife, Alissa, was 7 1/2 months pregnant. In this beautiful book, Alissa tells and shows her struggle to cope with this unimaginable tragedy. AMERICAN WIDOW is available as a library book club set, so if you’re part of a book club or thinking about starting one, check it out!

  •  comic

     

    Our graphic novel festival is just around the corner! Here's a list of some of our favorite graphic novels to get you ready for a weekend of 'comic' relief.

     

     scott pilgrimSCOTT PILGRIM'S PRECIOUS LITTLE LIFE
    by Brian O’Malley
    (2004)

    The first book in the Scott Pilgrim vs the Universe series, Precious Little Life introduces the captivating juxtaposition of real life problems with bizarre video game style rules and mechanics.

     

    mcninjaDR. MCNINJA
    by Christ Hastings
    (2013)

    Originally started as a webcomic, Dr. McNinja runs on the rules of whatever is funniest and craziest goes. From his first adventure rescuing his family of ninjas from pirates, to his gorilla receptionist fighting the undead, Dr. McNinja is entertaining from start to finish.

     

    hedge knightHEDGE KNIGHT
    by GRR Martin
    (2004)

    Adapted from his Knight of the Seven Kingdoms series, Hedge Knight offers a look at the world of Game of Thrones a century before the events of the main series. Following a wandering knight by the name of Dunk, the series shows the struggle of good man trying to live his code in a world that considers honor a liability.

     

    justice leagueJUSTICE LEAGUE NEW 52
    by Geoff Johns
    (2012)

    Part of the New 52 reboot, the Justice League series introduces the core collection of superheroes as they try to work together to save the earth from an alien invasion. For new readers to DC’s universe, this is a great place to start as you get to know the characters.

     

    nimonaNIMONA
    by Noelle Stevenson
    (2015)

    Nimona follows the titular villain’s sidekick as she and Lord Blackheart try to upset the balance of good and evil by proving the kingdom’s heroes aren’t as shiny as they pretend. Great for younger and older audiences alike, Nimona demonstrates both complexities in morality as well as in the well-developed female protagonist. Also, Dragons!

  • GG 2018 FB

    Like many of you, I am an avid reader. Probably also like many of you, I didn’t really grow up reading comics. My experience with comic book characters came more by way of the big and small screens (Adam West will always be my most favorite Batman) than it did by reading. Even after marrying a comics enthusiast, I still wouldn’t really call myself a comic book reader. 

    While in college I started hearing more and more about graphic novels, and I stumbled upon a few works of graphic nonfiction, and I was hooked! Even though I might not be up to date on all the latest incarnations of Spider-Man, I'm definitely a fan of the medium,  and given the dramatic rise in publishing rates for graphic novels of all kinds, I’m clearly not the only one. 

    If you’ve walked around the library or taken a look at our calendar, you’ll probably know that I’m writing this post to promote our second annual GET GRAPHIC FESTIVAL. This year’s featured guest will be Victoria Jamieson, award-winning author/illustrator of ROLLER GIRL and the new ALL’S FAIRE IN MIDDLE SCHOOL. The festival, which takes place on October 13 and 14, will celebrate all things about graphic novels; in addition to Jamieson’s keynote addresses (one on Friday night and one on Saturday), we will have breakout sessions by local illustrators, art experimentation stations, and interactive games. A variety of graphic novels for all ages will be for sale courtesy of Dragon’s Keep. 

    Tickets are now available for the keynote addresses; here are some links for your convenience!

    Tickets for Friday, October 13

    Tickets for Saturday, October 14

    I’m not the only one who loves graphic novels! Here’s a round up of recommendations and recaps extolling the virtues of this medium! 

    Recap of last year’s festival

    AuthorLink Recap: Gene Yang (pt.1)

    Graphic Novel Festival with Gene Yang (pt.2)

    Recommendations and Lists

    If You Like: Sci-Fi Graphic Novels for Kids  

    Favorite Graphic Memoirs 

    Favorite Graphic Novels

    Did you know? 

    DC Comics Rebirth  

    Third Party Comics 

  • gene yang

    On the second day of our Get Graphic! Festival,  we started thinking about how to be a cartoonist. Artists like Gene Luen Yang, (AMERICAN BORN CHINESE), Jess Smart Smiley (UPSIDE DOWN: A VAMPIRE TALE), and Jake Parker (MISSILE MOUSE) held workshops on the process of making a comic. These are 7 things we learned:

    1. Yang suggested having ideas rooted in what you know. In his first comic, GORDON YAMAMOTO AND THE KING OF THE GEEKS, he tells the story of a young man with a spaceship stuck up his nose.   “This is from my life. I have never had a spaceship stuck up my nose, but I have had a lifelong struggle with sinus issues,” said Yang. “The problem with sinus issues is that it’s never anyone’s fault. But one day I began thinking, what if it was somebody’s fault? What if there was something sentient plugging up my nose?”  

    2. The characters an artist draws and even the artist’s own artistic style change as they are drawing. To overcome this, Yang says that he draws his characters over and over again till they stop changing.  

    3. Real writers organize their stories before writing. You think your subconscious can handle writing blind, but if you're anything like Yang, your subconscious is an idiot.  

    4. Smiley taught us that the job of a panel in a comic is not only to tell a piece of a story but also to get you to read the next part.  

    5. The power of symbolism changes our ideas. Because comics tell stories with words and images, these two types of communication converge to tell a story in a way that is unique to the genre.  

    6. The characters are who we experience the comic through. We need to feel bad for them, they need to be likable, they need to be be funny, says Parker.  We have to want to follow them.  

    7. According to Parker, the most important thing to remember about making comics is clarity. He would sacrifice an awesome picture for a better understanding of what’s going on.

     

  • graphic novels 01

     

    Let’s talk about one of the proverbial elephants in the room of literary works: graphic novels. As a form of literature, graphic novels and comic books have been around for nearly a century. However, the term “graphic novel,” which was originally used in the 1960s, did not gain prominence until the late 1970s (Hintz & Tribunella, 2013). Since then, the term has become more widely accepted as describing a book-length story with images that uses panels. Recently, there has been an increased interest in the format. Although comic books and graphic novels have always found an audience, in the last decade alone their sales in North America have increased by 90% (Gavigan, 2014).  Graphic novels for all ages covering a variety of topics are being published every year. According to one statistic, sales increased from $43 million in 2001 to a staggering $375 million in 2007 (Holston & Nguyen, 2008).

    Despite this recent surge in interest, many people are hesitant to accept the format and many negative perceptions and misconceptions surrounding graphic novels still exist. For example, one misconception that is still being corrected is that the word “graphic” refers to the level of violent or sexual content found in the books (Chance, 2014). Many still associate comics and graphic novels exclusively with superheroes. Some also believe that the format should not be considered a legitimate literary format. Others think the format is a good start for reluctant readers before they move onto other formats. 

    Although there are studies that support the use of graphic novels and discuss their benefits and literary merits, the purpose of this post is not to prove whether or not graphic novels have literary value or educational benefits. The purpose of this blog is to invite you to decide for yourself what you think of the format. Check out a graphic novel (yes, all ages can do this). See what you think of the format. We have three collections of graphic novels and comics: one for children, one for teens and one for adults. I believe that books can play a variety of roles for different people. See what role you might want graphic novels to play for you. 

    Here is a booklist of graphic novels (they are for children but adults and teens might enjoy many of them too!).

    References  

    Chance, R. (2014). Young adult literature in action: A librarian's guide (2nd ed.). Westport, CT: Libraries Unlimited.

    Gavigan, K. W. (January, 2014). Shedding new light on graphic novel collections: A circulation and collection analysis study in six middle school libraries. School Libraries Worldwide, 20 (1), 97-115.

    Hintz, C., & Tribunella, E. (2013). Reading children's literature: A critical introduction. New York, NY: Bedford/St. Martin's.      

    Holston, A., & Nguyen, T. (2008). The maverick graphic novel list: Unmasking the mystery of comics and graphic novels for libraries. Texas Library Journal, 84(3), 92-95.

  •  Graphic Novels you Can Give Without Worry 1

    Books make the best Christmas gifts! Alright, sure, I am a little biased, but I firmly believe there is a book for everyone, even for the pickiest of readers.  Last month, I wrote a post singing the praises of graphic novels and why you should read them. All those reasons also apply to why graphic novels make great gifts!

    Last year, we published a list of well-reviewed, clean graphic novels that make great gifts for anyone on your list. We’ve had such great feedback about last year’s suggestions, so here is an updated edition including some newer releases that have hit the shelves since then.

    12.7 Rebel LadiesBRAZEN: REBEL LADIES WHO ROCKED THE WORLD
    By Penelope Bagieu
    (2018) 

    With her characteristic wit and dazzling drawings, celebrated graphic novelist Penelope Bagieu profiles the lives of these feisty female role models, some world famous, some little known. From Nellie Bly to Mae Jemison or Josephine Baker to Naziq al-Abid, the stories in this comic biography are sure to inspire the next generation of rebel ladies.

     

    12.7 The Prince and the DressmakerTHE PRINCE AND THE DRESSMAKER
    By Jen Wang
    (2018) 

    Prince Sebastian is looking for a bride--or rather, his parents are looking for one for him. Sebastian is too busy hiding his secret life from everyone. Sebastian's secret weapon (and best friend) is the brilliant dressmaker Frances--one of only two people who know the truth: sometimes this boy wears dresses. But Frances dreams of greatness, and being someone's secret weapon means being a secret. Forever. How long can Frances defer her dreams to protect a friend?

     

    12.7 SheetsSHEETS
    By Brenna Thummler
    (2018) 

    Marjorie Glatt feels like a ghost. A practical thirteen-year-old in charge of the family laundry business, her daily routine features unforgiving customers, unbearable P.E. classes, and the fastidious Mr. Saubertuck who is committed to destroying everything she's worked for.

     

    12.7 ApolloAPOLLO
    By Matt Fitch
    (2018) 

    In 1969, humankind set foot on the moon. Neil Armstrong, Edwin "Buzz" Aldrin, and Michael Collins carried the fire for all the world. Backed by the brightest minds in engineering and science, the three boarded a rocket and flew through the void, just to know that we could. In Apollo, Matt Fitch, Chris Baker, and Mike Collins unpack the urban legends, the gossip, and the speculation to reveal a remarkable true story about life, death, dreams, and the reality of humanity's greatest exploratory achievement

     

    12.7 The Gigantic Beard that was EvilTHE GIGANTIC BEARD THAT WAS EVIL
    By Stephen Collins
    (2013) 

    On the buttoned-down island of Here, all is well. By which we mean: orderly, neat, contained, and, moreover, beardless. Or at least it is until one famous day, when Dave, bald but for a single hair, finds himself assailed by a terrifying, unstoppable... monster*! (*beard) Where did it come from? How should the islanders deal with it? And what, most importantly, are they going to do with Dave? 

     

    Happy gift-giving! If you missed last year’s list, check it out here.

  • graphic novel gifts

     

    We at the library firmly believe that everyone should get a book for Christmas. It’s just one of those weird quirks that’s a requirement for working at a library. That being said, not everyone should get the same book for Christmas. Everyone has different interests, with some people even liking (gasp!) graphic novels and comics. Now, graphic novels can be a tricky gift to buy. There are many of them that live up to the term “graphic”, which can turn people off from them. However, there are some great graphic novels out there, and we want to help you find them. So, if you have someone who’s into graphic novels, here are four well-reviewed, clean graphic novels you can give to anyone without shame.

    12.19.17 American Born ChineseAMERICAN BORN CHINESE
    By Gene Luen Yang
    (2006)

    This is an excellent novel that explores Chinese myth and Chinese American culture. In it, three stories are told. The first is about the Chinese myth of the Monkey King, the second is about Jin Wang, a Chinese American student who is ostracized at his school for his race, and the third is about Danny, who deals with the negative Chinese stereotype his cousin offers when he visits. These stories converge in a profound way, giving a message of acceptance and kindness. 

     

    12.19.2017 Wire and NerveWIRES AND NERVE
    By Marissa Meyer
    (2017)

    If you read and loved the Lunar Chronicles by Marissa Meyer, then you are in for a treat with this graphic novel. The adventures of Cinder and her friends continue in this story focused on Iko. This is the first of a series of graphic novels that will wrap up some plot points from the original series and allow readers to know these characters better. 

     

    12.19.2017 NimonaNIMONA
    By Noelle Stevenson
    (2015)

    This graphic novel is a fast-paced, satirical take of the villain/hero fantasy motif. Lord Blackheart is a man with a vendetta against The Institute of Law Enforcement and Heroics. However, his plans are unsuccessful until he hires Nimona, a young girl with shapeshifting powers and sarcastic wit. Together, they plan to show the world that the “good guys” are the real bad guys. 

     

    12.19.2017 Atomic RoboATOMIC ROBO
    By Brian Clevinger
    (2008)

    This is an entertaining series that features a robot built by Tesla who forms a corporation of “action scientists” who save the world on a regular basis from all kinds of threats, including vampires, Dr. Dinosaur, and lots and lots of Nazis. With plenty of humor and action, this is a fun read, especially for younger teenage boys.

     
  • graphic to textual

    Let me start by saying there is nothing wrong with children reading graphic novels. There are a lot of wonderful graphic novels for kids and many have won critical acclaim as quality literature. We have a super graphic novel collection in the Children’s Department and for a lot of kids they first find a love of reading from graphic novels. 

    But let’s face it, being good at reading graphic novels is not going to help a child get through their high school English class. At some point kids need to become comfortable reading traditional literature. I frequently have parents ask me for suggestions for getting their comic loving child to try a more traditional book format. I usually suggest a transition book that is highly illustrated but has more text than a graphic novel. Then, a reader can move from a highly illustrated book to a more text rich book.

    Here are a few reading pathways starting at some popular graphic novels and leading to more text rich books. 

    pathway 1

    If you like: AMULET: THE STONEKEEPER
    By Kazu Kibuishi
    (2008)

    Emily's and Narvin's mother is kidnapped and dragged into a strange and magical world where, it seems, the children's great-grandfather has been before. It's up to the children to set things right and save their mother's life.

    Try (highly illustrated): DINOTOPIA
    By James Gurney
    (1999)

    An unabridged republication of James Gurney's influential 1999 story about the adventures of Gideon Altaire. The second half of the book includes 45 new images, including never-before-published storyboards, concept sketches, and production paintings, plus new characters, stories, and backstory notes from James Gurney's creative archives.

    Then (traditional format): GREGOR THE OVERLANDER
    By Suzanne Collins
    (2005)

    When eleven-year-old Gregor and his two-year-old sister are pulled into a strange underground world, they trigger an epic battle involving men, bats, rats, cockroaches, and spiders while on a quest foretold by ancient prophecy.

     pathway 2

    If you like: BIG NATE FROM THE TOP
    By Lincoln Pierce
    (2010)

    Nate Wright is an eleven years old sixth grader who has the distinction of setting the record for school detentions.

    Try (highly illustrated): DIARY OF A WIMPY KID
    By Jeff Kinney
    (2007)

    Acclaimed debut author Jeff Kinney brilliantly re-creates the typical humor and logic of middle school boys sidling into adolescence. Sixth grader Greg Heffley doesn't understand his annoying younger brother, obnoxious older one, or well-meaning parents. But he knows enough to record his daily thoughts in a manly journal—not some girly diary. In a unique novel brimming with laugh-out-loud moments, Greg chronicles his first turbulent year of middle school.

    Then (traditional format): THE TERRIBLE TWO
    By Mack Barnett
    2015

    When master prankster Miles Murphy moves to sleepy Yawnee Valley, he challenges the local mystery prankster in an epic battle of tricks, but soon the two join forces to pull off the biggest prank ever seen.

     pathway 3

    If you like: BABYMOUSE: QUEEN OF THE WORLD
    By Jennifer Holm
    (2005)

    An imaginative mouse dreams of being queen of the world, but will settle for an invitation to the most popular girl's slumber party.

    Try (highly illustrated): BABYMOUSE: TALES FROM THE LOCKER
    By Jennifer Holm
    (2017)

    Babymouse joins the school Film Club and writes the greatest cinematic masterpiece of all time! But when the movie gets shown to the entire school, will it be a box office hit or a flop?"-- Provided by publisher.

    Then (tradiational format): FROM THE NOTEBOOKS OF A MIDDLE SCHOOL PRINCESS
    By Meg Cabot
    (2015)

    A middle-grade spinoff of The Princess Diaries, about the long-lost sister of Mia Thermopolis, Princess of Genovia.

  • funny superhero graphic novels 01

    Find them in the catalog: 

    THE ADVENTURES OF SUPERHERO GIRL

    THE SHADOW HERO

    MOON GIRL AND DEVIL DINOSAUR

  • illustrated intermediate 01

    Find them in the catalog: 

    THE BAD GUYS

    RICKY RICOTTA’S MIGHTY ROBOT

    GAME OVER, SUPER RABBIT BOY!

  • sci fi kids graphic novels1 01

    Find them in the catalog: 

    ONE TRICK PONY

    NEWSPRINTS

    HILO: THE BOY WHO CRASHED TO EARTH

  •  informational comics

    There are some kids who just don’t like to read.  Maybe they are a slow reader or have a learning disability.  Maybe they just can’t be bothered to sit down long enough to read a whole book.  When a kid like that gets assigned to do a report for school, it can cause major trauma and drama for both the child and parent.  One solution is to try an informational comic book. Here at the Provo Library we have around 250 informational comic books for kids on a wide variety of topics, from science to history, including 80 biographies (think president or explorer reports).  The informational comics have a lot of great…well… information, and it’s in a form that is palatable for reluctant and comic-book-only readers.  Informational comic books are so enticing, why not pick out an interesting one and just set it on the coffee table in the living room. Then watch and see how long it takes before your child picks it up and starts reading! 

    Here are some great informational comics.     

    3.28 Older than DirtOLDER THAN DIRT: A WILD BUT TRUE HISTORY OF EARTH
    By Don Brown and Mike Perfit
    (2017)

    A precocious and often sarcastic groundhog and his friend, an earthworm, take the reader on a tour of the history of the Earth, from the Big Bang to its projected demise.  

     

    3.28 ShackletonSHACKLETON: THE VOYAGE OF THE JAMES CAIRD
    By Gavin McCumiskey and David Butler
    (2016)

    The harrowing adventure of the passengers of Shackleton’s ill-fated expedition comes to life with dramatic dialog and full color illustrations. 

     

    3.28 BaggywrinklesBAGGYWRINKLES: A LUBBER’S GUIDE TO LIFE AT SEA
    By Lucy Bellwood
    (2016)

    Don’t know your port from your bow? This humorous guide introduces the reader to a boatload of nautical terminology, history, and lore.

     
  • inktober 01

    Happy Inktober!

    With the Get Graphic Festival just around the corner, I’ve been thinking a lot about drawing and telling stories through pictures. A picture may be worth 1000 words, but more often than not I’ll choose to write instead of draw. Stretching that creative muscle can be challenging when you question your ability, but I believe that practice is the only way to improve. I practice reading. I practice writing. And this October I’m taking the Inktober challenge and I’m going to practice drawing!

    Inktober is a challenge created by Jake Parker (who will also be at the Get Graphic Festival) in 2009 to help improve his inking skills. Since then, every year artists from all over the world have taken on this 31 day challenge to create an ink drawing every day during the month the October.

    Inktober 2

    A drawing every day?! But I have no idea what to draw!

    Never fear! I know, I know, it’s October and fear is the cool thing, but ideas are something you don’t have to worry about because there is a prompt for each of the 31 days. We got this! 

    Inktober 1

    Missed the first drawing(s) of the month? Start now!

    If a drawing a day seems too overwhelming, then take the slower but still steady path of drawing every other day, or even just every week. The point is you’re practicing drawing, in ink, regularly.

    I hope that as you draw that you will feel the power of graphic storytelling and will get even more out of the upcoming Get Graphic Festival on October 13th and 14th. It will be a lot of fun, and inspiring for artists of all skill levels.

    Good luck, and happy drawing!

  • gaiman

    With numerous book awards, best-selling comics, and multiple screenwriting credits under his belt, Neil Gaiman is one of the most widely recognized writers still living. You may be familiar with his Newbery-award winning THE GRAVEYARD BOOK, or the beloved STARDUST and CORALINE novels. Some may also be familiar with his SANDMAN comics or even his work with Terry Pratchett on GOOD OMENS.

    But this prolific author has many wonderful works that often go unnoticed. Here are a few of Neil Gaiman’s hidden gems. 

    2.14 InstructionsINSTRUCTIONS
    By Neil Gaiman
    Illustrated by Charles Vess
    (2010)

    A fun parody of literary tropes and cliches, walk through this fairy tale with detailed “instructions” on how to get a happily ever after. 

     

    2.14 A Study in EmeraldA STUDY IN EMERALD
    By Neil Gaiman
    (2003)

    One of Gaiman’s oddest short stories, it combines the fantastical monsters of H.P. Lovecraft with the logical world of Sherlock Holmes. Solve the murder of a Victorian “gentleman” in a London ruled by something other than human. 

     

    2.14 Norse MythologyNORSE MYTHOLOGY
    By Neil Gaiman
    Read by Neil Gaiman
    (2017)

    I particularly recommend the audiobook version of this collection of myths. While Gaiman reads, he is able to add humor and personality into familiar heros (and villains), like Thor, Odin and Loki. 

     

    2.14 The Books of MagicTHE BOOKS OF MAGIC
    By Neil Gaiman (along with John Ney Rieber and Peter Gross)
    Illustrated by John Bolton (along with Scott Hampton, Charles Vess, Paul Johnson, Peter Gross and Jason Temujin Minor)
    (1993)

    An often overlooked addition to Gaiman’s bibliography, this book introduces characters both from superhero comics and Gaiman’s own SANDMAN series. An interesting look at magic, fantasy and growing up. (And the art is great too.) 

     

    2.14 Unnatural CreaturesUNNATURAL CREATURES
    By Neil Gaiman
    (2013)

    Unlike the others on this list, Neil Gaiman is mainly the curator (rather the author) of these short stories. They represent a wide range of fantasy authors, from new authors to classics, including (of course) one of Neil Gaiman’s own stories. 

     
  •  Graphic Novels1 updated

    It may surprise you to hear that despite my great interest and enthusiasm for graphic novels and comics, I actually haven’t read very many yet! But like many good things – ice cream, cozy blankets, mountains, label makers – you don’t need to have tried them all to know how wonderful a medium it is. But, because I’m so in love with graphic novels, I want to read more of them. Come New Year’s, as I pondered my 2019 reading goals (the only New Year’s resolution I bother to make), I had a thought. A bold, possibly (probably) crazy thought.

    What if I read every graphic novel in the library?

    So I did the math. And realized just how many graphic novels we have at the library.

    math meme

    I realized this really was a crazy idea. Unless…

    Good Idea

    Parameters! Yes! Setting some guidelines wouldn’t hurt; sure, it might change the idea a bit, but realistic goals are good goals.After a few minutes, my crazy idea evolved into a legend of a goal. Drumroll, please:

    READ GOAL 2019

    Yes, I cut back on my original idea by focusing on just the Graphic Novel section in the adult collection of the library. It may seem like a lot, excluding books found in the Juvenile Comics, Young Adult Comics, and Overdrive collections. But with approximately 805 titles (and counting) in the Graphic Novel section alone, I’d say I have my work cut out for me. And to ensure success, I decided to share my goal with you, dear readers! It begins! Stay tuned for updates on my progress or decent into madness, whatever the case may be.

    Have you made any reading goals for 2019? Do you think I’m going to lose my mind attempting mine? Comment and let us know

  • Read to Travel

    So here is the thing, I like to read AND I like to travel. And it is a sweet spot when both things happen at the same time (meaning, sometimes I pick where I travel based on a book I read or sometimes I read books based on places that I have traveled to or will travel to). If you love to read and love to travel, this series of posts is for you. I'll be sharing my top six destinations that hit the sweet spot of good books and great location, where the place has as much personality as the characters in the books. Granted, due to my being a little long-winded, it might take a few posts to get through all my favorites… 

    6. Hannibal, Missouri, USA

    I will confess, the first time that I went to Hannibal .…I didn’t choose to go. I was nine and my mother made the decision for a family vacation. So we went. But I liked it so much that I went two more times - that is saying something, right?

    Basically this is the literary travel spot for all things Mark Twain (aka Samuel Clemens). Think TOM SAWYER and HUCKLEBERRY FINN. Think of all the cave spelunking and riverboat rides. In Hannibal you can tour the Mark Twain Boyhood Home & Museum Properties. I loved looking at the white picket fence and thinking about how Tom tricked everyone else into white-washing it for him. When I was in Hannibal (many years ago) I also toured around other museums and saw where “Becky Thatcher” would have “lived."

    8.6 tom sawyer statue

    There is something to be said for skipping rocks and having a picnic next to the mighty Mississippi River, the very river that Huck Finn and Jim sailed down on a raft. In fact, there are a lot of places in Hannibal where you can just sit and watch that river. And possibly contemplate all of those many big things that Mark Twain leads you to think about when reading Huckleberry Finn. 

    8.6 Mark Twain Cave with Joella

    But the highlight for this area is the Mark Twain Cave Complex. There you can explore where Becky and Tom got lost. And if you happen to have an older brother the way that I do—perhaps you might jump every now and again due to said older brother’s shenanigans. Seriously. There's nothing quite like going inside just after reading the scary chapters about Tom and Becky being lost in that same cave (the very one!) and then having your brother do his best to scare the heebeegeebees out of you. Literature definitely came alive for me in that moment!

    8.6 Mark Twain Cave

    And with festivals and theater performances giving nods to all things Mark Twain, this is a travel destination totally connected to all things literary. 

    Bonus: There is also a movie and a graphic novel adaptation of Tom Sawyer and not one but two different graphic novel adaptations for Huckleberry Finn. 

    8.6 Tom Sawyer TwainTHE ADVENTURES OF TOM SAWYER
    By Mark Twain
    (1876)

     

    Tom Sawyer FilmTOM SAWYER
    (1986) 

     

    8.6 Tom Sawyer HallTHE ADVENTURES OF TOM SAWYER: A GRAPHIC NOVEL
    By Margaret Hall
    (2014)

     

    Huckleberry Finn TwainADVENTURES OF HUCKLEBERRY FINN
    By Mark Twain
    (1884)

     

    8.6 Huckleberry Finn RatliffTHE ADVENTURES OF HUCKLEBERRY FINN
    By Tom Ratliff
    (2008 

     

    8.6 Huckleberry Finn SilvermoonADVENTURES OF HUCKLEBERRY FINN
    By Crystal Silvermoon
    (2017)

     
    Keep an eye out in the coming weeks for other literary vacation destinations that I have loved!   
  • Read to Travel

    Last timeI talked about the good ol’ literary home of Tom Sawyer on the Mississippi. My number five pick for literary vacations takes us abroad…to Italy! And really, I could have included the WHOLE COUNTRY on this literary smorgasbord. But I was good and I narrowed it down to one city—Rome!

    5. Rome, Italy

    This location is one hotbed of history—and thus literature! Think about it, how many times do people reference JULIUS CAESAR? Or Roman Mythology? Or parts of the Bible that took place in Rome? There was so much that happened here. “Et tu, Brute?” 

    colosseum1

    When I visited Rome, one of my favorite things was going to the Roman Forum. There I saw where Julius Caesar and Mark Antony delivered their famous speeches. I don’t think I would have appreciated this attraction as much if I hadn’t read the great Shakespeare classic Julius Caesar or studied various Roman Mythology in middle school. (Plus there are a plethora of other books like Rick Riordan’s THE MARK OF ATHENA or Jennifer Nielsen’s MARK OF THE THIEF—both of which I better understood because I had traveled to this ancient land and saw the Roman Forum.) 

    For those who are really into art, history, and mysteries, touring around the various churches in Italy brought to mind Dan Brown’s book ANGELS AND DEMONS. I mean, if you are enjoying art work by some of the world’s masters—you might as well think of a suspenseful mystery book… right? 

    For those moments when I wondered about the various people that lived in Roman history—including children—I thought of THE THIEVES OF OSTIA (a kid’s mystery book that takes place in ancient Rome)—because walking on all the cobblestone streets reminded me of passages in the book where kids have to go from place to place to figure out a mystery.   

    Basically, there are a bunch of books that have portions of history that take place in ancient Rome. And having traveled there I feel like I understand the literature just a little bit more. Not to mention there is the famous Colosseum across the street, the great Spanish Steps, and the Pantheon that all have a lot of history—and make their way into various books and movies that take place in Rome. I know it isn’t literature, but I couldn’t help myself—when visiting the Colosseum I pictured all that happened there in BEN HUR. And I smiled at the memories of watching ROMAN HOLIDAY when going to the Trevi Fountain, Spanish Steps, and Pantheon. 

    colosseum2

    Thankfully I also had my RICK STEVES’ ITALY tour book so not only could I think of great literary masterpieces as I toured around Rome, I could also find the best place to eat gelato and create my own Roman memories! 

    So there you have it, my #5 literary destination pick (a city with a zillion book and movie references). Keep an eye out for my next pick for a literary destination vacation.  

    Keep an eye out in the coming weeks for other literary vacation destinations that I have loved!   

  • third party

    We all know the two big names in comic books: Marvel and DC. We read their comics, watch their movies, and pick sides over which one is our favorite. However, there’s no monopoly on superheroes, and these two powerhouses aren’t the end of the story. Since the 80s, dozens of smaller publishers have cropped up, each with their own unique heroes, stories, and flavors. Our library collects highly reviewed comics regardless of publisher, so it can be a good place to get your toes wet and try a universe you haven’t read or watched before. Here are just a few of the third-party comics publishers that we house:

    Image Comics

    Founded in 1992, Image Comics provides a place where comics creators can publish their stories without giving up the rights to their characters. This is a huge departure from Marvel and DC’s way of doing things, and means that almost any comic you pick up from them will have an all-new cast. This has led to hundreds of separate storylines rather than a coherent universe. Because of their relative independence (and since you don’t need to know 60 years of history for each character), Image comic books are easy to jump into.

    8.22 DescenderDESCENDER
    By Jeff Lemire
    (2015)

     

     

     

     

     

    CHEW
    Bby John Layman
    (2012)

    REED GUNTHER
    By Shane & Chris Houghton
    (2011)

    INVINCIBLE
    By Robert Kirkman
    (2011)

    Dark Horse

    Founded in 1986, Dark Horse has its fingers in all the pies. It does licensed material like the BUFFY THE VAMPIRE SLAYER comics, creator-owned material like Mike Mignola’s HELLBOY, and even some manga.

    8.22 BuffyBUFFY THE VAMPIRE SLAYER
    By Joss Whedon
    (2007)

     

     

     

     

     

    HELLBOY
    By Michael Mignola
    (2003)

    THE LEGEND OF ZELDA: HYRULE HISTORIA
    Edited by Patrick Thorpe
    (2013)

    TRIGUN MAXIMUM
    By Yasuhiro Nightow
    (2003)

    VIZ

    Founded the same year as Dark Horse, VIZ is a far more focused publisher. They do manga, manga, and more manga. Because they’re also heavily involved in anime licensing and the television side of things, their manga is frequently adapted into popular shows. Fans of the manga want to watch the shows, and new fans of the shows want to read the manga, so it’s a circular system where both the print and the screen versions of a story benefit.

    8.22 NarutoNARUTO
    By Masashi Kishimoto
    (2003)

     

     

     

     

     

    OURAN HIGH SCHOOL HOST CLUB
    By Bisco Hatori
    (2005)

    FULLMETAL ALCHEMIST
    By Hiromu Arakawa
    (2005)

    TOKYO GHOUL
    By Sui Ashida

    IDW

    Last but not least we have Idea and Design Works, or IDW for short. Recognized as the fifth largest comic publisher in the United States, IDW focuses largely on graphic novel adaptations of popular TV shows and films. Though it has adapted several series for adults, the bulk of the company’s titles are intended for children, including their line of Cartoon Network-based comics.

    8.22 Doctor WhoDOCTOR WHO: PRISONERS OF TIME
    By Scott & David Tipton
    (2013)

     

     

     

     

     

    THE POWERPUFF GIRLS
    By Troy Little
    (2014)

    TMNT ADVENTURES
    By Justin Eisinger
    (2012)

    MY LITTLE PONY: THE MAGIC BEGINS
    By Lauren Faust
    (2013)

     

  • Graphic Novels

    It’s okay to have a favorite genre. It’s okay to be afraid to branch out. Though a rare event, I know how bitterly disappointing it is to try a new book and hate it. Such travesty I would not wish upon my worst enemy! (Kidding, I would, #slytherin). That said, I wouldn’t be doing due diligence as a librarian if I didn’t give you a helpful nudge out of your reading rut.  

    May I suggest reading graphic novels?

    “Graphic novels aren’t real books.”

    “Those are just for kids, people should grow out of that.”

    “What’s to read? They’re just pictures with blurbs”

    “I’m not into superheroes or that Japanese stuff.”

    If you had any of these thoughts, please allow me to meme at you for a moment.

    2gzi50

    Don’t be afraid. I’m here to guide you.

    Graphic novels are certainly real books, with character development, rich plotlines, exploratory themes, symbols, morals – you name it, they’ve got it. They aren’t just for kids, though there are titles written for all audiences. And there’s plenty of graphic novels written in all styles and genres, not just superhero comics or “that Japanese stuff” - or as it’s actually called, manga. And sure, you’re allowed to read what you already know you love (that’s one of the joys of reading!), but you’re missing out if you wave off this versatile, engaging medium.

    That’s right, graphic novels are a medium of storytelling, not a genre. Understanding this concept breaks many of the misconceptions I mentioned above. The visual component of graphic novels is part of the storytelling. And I don’t mean just the illustrations, but all its facets:  style, color, division of space on the page, panel shapes, panel borders, speech bubbles, captions, and more! Like other novelists write books in verse, prose, letters, journal entries, and more, graphic novel artists use visual elements to best present the story. It’s fascinating to see how different artists employ visual techniques in their story telling!

    Just like traditional novels, graphic novels cross all genres. It’s one of the beauties of the medium! With that said, that can make it hard to know where to start. Here are some suggestions for you:

    Genre: Memoir

    I could really go on and on about graphic memoirs, but I’ll let you explore this past blog post. My first non-manga, non-superhero graphic novel was MAUS, a popular, compelling read that introduces many people to the world of graphic novels. If you want something with a lighter tone, anything by Lucy Knisley (author of RELISH: MY LIFE IN THE KITCHEN) is an excellent choice. Her friendly, relatable tone and use of light, pastel color palette make her books, especially this one, a great choice for the shy newcomer.

    11.2 MausMAUS I
    by Art Spiegelman
    (1980)

     

    11.2 RelishRELISH: MY LIFE IN THE KITCHEN
    by Lucy Knisley
    (2013)

     

    Genre: Classics

    11.2 MetamorphosisMETAMORPHOSIS
    by Kafka 
    (2003)

    Kafka’s tales lend themselves so very well to visual interpretation. Acclaimed graphic artist Peter Kuper presents a kinetic illustrated adaptation of Franz Kafka's The Metamorphosis. Kuper's electric drawings--where American cartooning meets German expressionism--bring Kafka's prose to vivid life, reviving the original story's humor and poignancy in a way that will surprise and delight readers of Kafka and graphic novels alike.

     

    Genre: Magical Realism

    11.2 I Kill GiantsI KILL GIANTS
    by Joe Kelly
    (2008)

     

    Genre: Mystery

    11.2 Girl Over ParisGIRL OVER PARIS
    by Kate Leth
    (2016)

     

    Hopefully I’ve shown you how graphic novels would be a great addition to your to-read list! If you’re interested in reading more, check out this blog post that provides some fun fact and additional reading about graphic novels. And if you want a personalized recommendation, please come see us at the Reference Desk!