The Library is now open Monday - Friday 9:00 am - 7:00 pm and Saturday 9:00 am - 6:00 pm. Curbside is still available.
The Library is now open the following hours Monday-Friday 9:00 am - 7:00 pm and Saturday 9:00 am - 6:00 pm. Curbside is still available.
 

 

eBooks

  • Springtime Tree Blossoms

    I don’t know about you, but for the six weeks or so, I’ve been craving comfort foods and comfort reads. Instead of trying new, adventurous, nutritious recipes, I’ve been digging out old recipe cards and calling family members to see if they remember that one thing Grandma made when we were kids. Similarly, I haven’t had the mental space to crack open dark, angsty, or overly technical reads that I might normally be up for. There’s enough to worry about in the real world, so instead my reading time, especially at the end of the day, is focused on charming classics that I’ve loved for years.  

    As I’m guessing is the case for many of you, ANNE OF GREEN GABLES is the first book of that sort that comes to mind for me. So if you love Anne and you’d like something similar, this post and the follow-up next Friday are for you! Next week I’ll share well-known books you really ought to read if you haven’t already, but this week is a deeper dive into lesser-known Anne Shirley-esque reads. Some of the author names will likely be familiar, but these particular books fly under the radar when compared with the popularity of the Green Gables series. Nevertheless, they all feature smart, lovable heroines finding their way through girlhood and teenage life in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

    Just like the treats I’ve been making from old family recipes, these books are sweet, familiar, and mood-lifting, just what we need in the middle of a global pandemic.

    5.1 An Old Fashioned GirlAN OLD-FASHIONED GIRL
    By Louisa May Alcott
    (1869)

    This is my go-to read when I need a pick-me-up. LITTLE WOMEN might officially be my favorite book, but I think I read An Old-Fashioned Girl more often, especially since it’s short enough to finish in an evening or two. This sweet story of a country girl visiting her glamorous city friends might be a little heavy-handed in its moralizing, but isn’t that part of its charm? Best of all, its main character, Polly, combines some of the best characteristics of the four March sisters. She’s kind and hardworking and tries hard to be good, but she has enough weaknesses and quirks to make her lovable. And then there’s Tom, a mischievous, good-hearted, boyish boy who’s sure to win your heart.

     

    5.1 Daddy Long LegsDADDY LONG LEGS
    By Jean Webster
    (1912)

    Though I didn’t grow up reading this book, the Hale Center Theater’s delightful two-person musical production last year left me charmed and deeply contented in a way only my favorite childhood reads can. I read the book a short while later and discovered that my favorite aspects of the play – Jerusha’s personality and the clever dialogue – came directly from the book. But just ignore the existence of the Fred Astaire/Leslie Caron movie musical from the fifties – there’s no horrifyingly large age gap to worry about here.At the beginning of the story, Jerusha Abbot, the oldest orphan in the John Greer Home, has few prospects in life. Fortunately, an anonymous benefactor, whom Jerusha dubs “Daddy Long Legs,” decides to fund her further education. Jerusha heads off to a women’s college, where she writes Daddy Long Legs regular letters about her experiences. Witty, observant, and romantic, Jerusha’s a character loveable enough to rival Anne Shirley. And if you like Daddy Long Legs, be sure to read DEAR ENEMY too, just be prepared for a few casually positive references to eugenics that are jarring to read today.

     

    5.1 The Blue CastleTHE BLUE CASTLE
    By L.M. Montgomery
    (1926)

    Lucy Maud Montgomery wrote several other books and series beyond Anne of Green Gables, and this is my favorite of them. In The Blue Castle, Valancy Stirling has grown up in a rigidly strict home with domineering and often cruel family members. She’s always been quiet and submissive, willing to go along with her family’s claim that she’s unattractive and destined for mediocrity. When she receives a letter making her feel like time’s running out, Valancy throws caution to the wind and goes after exactly what – and who – she wants in her life. 

     

    5.1 Heaven to BetsyHEAVEN TO BETSY
    By Maud Hart Lovelace
    (1945)

    Even if you don’t recognize the title of the Betsy-Tacy series, you’ve heard of it before if you’ve ever watched you’ve got mail. Based on the author’s girlhood, this series follows Betsy Ray and her best friend Tacy from the age of five all the way through early adulthood. Feel free to read them all in order, but know that the early books are aimed at younger readers. If you’re wanting the Anne of Green Gables vibe, I’d recommend starting with Heaven to Betsy, which takes place during Betsy’s freshman year of high school in the early 1900s. Betsy and her friends feel so much like a person you could actually know, and it’s especially fun to see how much of what we still associate with middle class American teenage life started more than a century ago.

     

    5.1 A Girl of the LimberlostA GIRL OF THE LIMBERLOST
    By Gene Stratton-Porter
    (1909)

    Part of the joy of L.M. Montgomery’s books is her vivid descriptions of the beautiful, natural world, and that’s one of the most appealing aspects of The Girl of the Limberlost too. Gene Stratton-Porter was a naturalist as well as a novelist, which becomes abundantly clear in this book and its companion novels, FRECKLES and LADDIE. Protagonist Elnora Comstock has grown up poor and neglected by her widowed mother, who was emotionally destroyed when her husband died the day Elnora was born. Elnora begins high school uncomfortable and awkward, but through her own good nature, friendliness, and hard work selling the insect and plant specimens she collects from the Limberlost Swamp, she finds a place for herself in her community and in her family.

     

    5.1 MandyMANDY
    By Julie Andrews Edwards
    (1971)

    Yes, this is by THAT Julie Andrews. In addition to two memoirs, Andrews has written several books for children, and Mandy is a particular delight. Mandy is a ten-year-old girl who feels lost in the world until she discovers a deserted cottage in the woods near the English orphanage where she lives. Throughout most of the year, she sneaks away to the cottage, gradually beautifying it and making it her own. Though this book is more recently written than the others on the list and isn’t set in a specified time period, it’s lush descriptions of nature, sweet storyline, and winning heroine make it a natural fit for any Anne Shirley fan.

     
  • borrow ebooks

    I recently learned that Google has made finding free legal eBooks that can be borrowed from the library easier than ever. I was curious how well it worked, so I experimented with the feature. Here is what I discovered for both desktop and mobile versions.

    Desktop Computer3.12 Desktop Version

    After entering a book title on Google, the feature appears on the right side within what is known as the Google Knowledge Graph display. Basically, there is a box on the right side of the screen next to the search results. The box contains information about the book including ratings and reviews from various websites, book summary, publication date, author, genre, awards (if any), online bookstores where it is available to be purchased and FINALLY the Borrow ebook section.

    Be aware that if the book title is not available from the library, you will not see the Borrow ebook section. However, keep reading for additional search quirks.

    If the eBook is available, you will see a list of libraries within your geolocated range or, in other words, libraries nearby. If the wrong libraries are displayed, you can change your location by clicking on the Edit Location link and entering your zip code or city name. The library list will then reload.

    Don’t see Provo City Library listed? No problem.

    Provo City Library’s eBook holdings are found within the Utah’s Online Library collection. Utah’s Online Library gives Provo City Library card holders access to both the Provo City Library eBook collection and the Utah State Library collection.

    After searching, click on Utah’s Online Library to either borrow the item immediately or place a hold which will then notify you via email when the eBook is available.

    Please note, to borrow free legal eBooks from the online library, you will need a Provo City Library card. Library cards from other Utah libraries can also be used to check out eBooks from Utah’s Online Library, but will not give you access to Provo City Library’s collection.

     

    Mobile Device3.12 Mobile Version

    After searching Google on a mobile device, look for the block of color in the search results that shows the title and author of the book. Just below the title and author is a mini menu.

    Tap on Get Book in the mini menu. Then look for Borrow ebook. This section can be found just below the list of online bookstores.Tap on Utah’s Online Library. You will then be redirected to the eBook entry for the title you entered. Here you can either borrow the item immediately or place a hold which will then notify you via email when the eBook is available.

    Please note, to check out free legal eBooks from the online library, you will need a Provo City Library card. Library cards from other Utah libraries can also be used to check out eBooks from Utah’s Online Library, but will not give you access to Provo City Library’s collection.

    My Discoveries

    Through trial and error, I have discovered some quirks to be aware of with this search feature.

    Only OverDrive: There are other eBook collections out there including RBdigital which you also have access to with your Provo City Library card. However, Google search currently only works with OverDrive, so you will not see any results for other eBook collections.

    No audiobooks: Even though Utah’s Online Library also offers free legal audiobooks to borrow and listen to, Google’s search feature only works for eBooks. No results will come up if there is an audiobook but no eBook.

    Books made for the silver screen: Books made into movies or TV series don’t always return results. For example, I tried searching for Escape from Mr. Lemoncello’s Library which is a movie and a book. The title does not return any free eBooks even though the book is available in Utah’s Online Library collection. However, a search for the second book in the series, Mr. Lemoncello’s Great Race, which does not have a movie version, does come up.

    I have discovered that sometimes, adding “book” to the end of the title will help return the correct results, but not always.

    Correct titles: You know how Google is great for finding something even if you can’t quite remember what it’s called? Well that doesn’t work so well when finding eBooks. I tried experimenting with variations on book titles with poor results. For example, I search for Mistborn but no eBooks came up. However, when I changed my search to Mistborn: The Final Empire, then it came up.Tip: if you can’t remember the title, search for it on Google. After finding the correct title, perform a new search.

    Vague titles: Titles that are not specific enough to return good results can also be problematic. For example, Hunted. Just entering “hunted” in the search box will not return any eBook results. However, try adding “book” to the end of the title or the author’s name and you will have far better luck.

    My Conclusions

    While this is a handy new, automatic feature built into Google, the results are still a little sporadic. Readers that frequently look for books by searching Google will find this a useful tool. However, if you really want to know if an eBook is available, I would recommend directly searching Utah’s Online Library (https://utahsonlinelibrary.overdrive.com/). For me, I think this is a great new feature for browsing and chancing across interesting books, but it is less useful when I am looking for something specific.

  • Social Distancing

    If you are an extrovert, being quarantined is a tragic turn of events. You need people to thrive! How can introverts be with themselves all day without going crazy? As an ambivert, I can relate to the need to interact with people, but I can also handle being alone for long stretches of time. So, I’ve compiled a list of resources for those extroverts out there who are going crazy. 

    Find a new hobby

    There are many online resources that can help you learn something new. A good place to go is our LET’S LEARN GUIDES. There are several different guides that you can explore. Including: Coding, painting, birding, and playing guitar. These guides can direct you to other resources to expand your skills and they have different activity ideas to keep you occupied for hours. Additional resources include: LYNDA.COM, CREATIVEBUG, and HOBBIES AND CRAFTS REFERENCE CENTER.

    Stream a movie

    If you’re tired of your regular streaming service, then try KANOPY. This free service allows you a limited number of credits each month and widens your watching possibilities. Not only does it have modern movies and shows, but it also has some exercise videos, documentaries, and even programs for kids. WARNING: Our KANOPY subscription will expire in the summer, so get watching now!

    Try a Boredom Buster

    While everyone is stuck at home, our children’s librarians have been putting together boredom busters! These are 5-10 minute videos on FACEBOOK and YOUTUBE that teach a craft or skill. These are great for learning something new with limited screen time and resources.

    Start an online book club

    If you are missing your friends and want to start filling up your social calendar again, try an online book club. You can see previous posts here about good book club practices. Additionally, we added this post on digital book clubs just a little while ago. The benefit of an online book club is that you can do activities and discussions with your friends, create new friends in the book characters, and satisfy your need for socializing without breaking any social distancing rules.

    Read a book!

    (Of course this is on the list. Did you think I’d forget?)

    There are plenty of great books to read, characters to meet, and adventures to go on. Even if you can’t come physically to the library, you can get access our digital ebooks and audiobooks through OVERDRIVERB DIGITAL, and TUMBLEBOOKS. It’s important to note that we only have access to TUMBLEBOOKS until August, 2020. So get reading!

    Here are more resources if you need help choosing a book: NOVELIST, the LIBRARY’S BOOKISTS, Or you can request a PERSONALIZED READING RECCOMENDATION.Good luck!

  •  scottish mysteries

    It could be because I miss living in Scotland, but I've been drawn to books with Scottish narrators lately, and since I'm a mystery fan, I've found myself listening to Scottish mysteries. Whether you like the cozy stories or tough detectives, there's a series here for every mystery reader.

     

    5.25 Death of a GossipDEATH OF A GOSSIP
    by M.C. Beaton
    1985

    Constable Hamish MacBeth investigates the murder of Lady Jane Hamilton who has a nasty habit of digging up dirt on the residents and guests of Lochdubh. 

     

    5.25 Raven BlackRAVEN BLACK
    by Ann Cleeves
    2006

    When the body of a teenage girl turns up on the Shetland Islands, Inspector Jimmy Perez launches an investigation into the killing, taking him into the heart of sinister secrets from the past. 

     

    5.25 The Sunday Philosphy ClubTHE SUNDAY PHILOSOPHY CLUB
    by Alexander McCall Smith
    2004

    When Isabel Dalhousie witnesses the death of a young man falling from the balcony of the Edinburgh concert hall, she decides to take it upon herself to solve the murder. 

     

    5.25 Resurrection MenRESURRECTION MEN
    by Ian Rankin
    (2001)

    Sent to a rehabilitation school after a serious mistake, Inspector John Rebus discovers that his classmates are plotting a drug heist and might be connected to Detective Sergeant Siobhan Clarke's investigation to an art dealer's murder. 

     

    5.25 A Wee Murder in My ShopWEE MURDER IN MY SHOP
    by Fran Stewart
    (2015)

    While searching for hidden treasures in the Scottish Highlands, shop owner Peggy Winn purchases an old tartan shawl that unexpectedly comes with the ghost of a 14th-century Scotsman, who, once she returns to Vermont, helps her discover who murdered her ex-boyfriend.

     
  •  4.15 Apocalyptic

    Given the sudden popularity of pandemic-themed movies on Netflix, the abundance of pandemic-themed news in real life, and the general post-apocalyptic feeling a lot of us are experiencing by practicing social distancing, I thought I’d compile my own list of books I’ve read and enjoyed that are close to this topic. While some may find this list of fiction hits a little too close to home right now, I thought all of these books carried an overall message of hope and endurance.

    4.15 Station ElevenSTATION ELEVEN
    By Emily St. John Mandel
    (2014)

    You know that warm and fuzzy feeling you get when you snuggle up in a blanket, a hot drink in one hand, your loved ones close, and everything is right with the world? That is the feeling I get when I think about this book. Yes, it is about a flu pandemic that wipes out a significant percentage of people on Earth, but this book is beautiful. This excellently-written novel starts off with a pandemic that spreads practically overnight and effects most of the world’s population in about a two-week time period. The story follows five people who are connected by a simple twist of fate, jumping back and forth between their pre and post pandemic lives. But this book is less about the storyline and more about how it makes you feel—melancholic and hopeful at the same time. You’ll come away from this one with a deeper appreciate for the normal, everyday life we often take for granted. The result is a view of a post-apocalyptic world that is hopeful, at times scary, and very riveting.

     

    4.15 The Dog StarsTHE DOG STARS
    By Peter Heller
    (2012)

    Hig lives a fairly solitary life holed up in an abandoned airport after a pandemic killed most of the population.  When he’s out on a flight one day, searching for provisions, Hig gets a radio signal; something he hasn’t heard in a very long time.  His decision to follow the radio signal in search of life leads him to danger and hope, and he discovers inner strengths that he never knew he possessed.  If you like this book, I highly recommend Heller’s latest novel, THE RIVER, which tells the story of two men caught in the path of an oncoming wildfire. 

     

    4.15 The FiremanTHE FIREMAN
    By Joe Hill
    (2016)

    Of all the books on this list, this is the one that focuses most on the actions of people who are trying to survive a pandemic instead of on the people the pandemic leaves behind.  When Harper Grayson, a pregnant nurse, discovers she’s caught a horrible new disease that generally leads its victims to death by spontaneous combustion, she’s determined to live long enough to deliver her baby.  She turns to a mysterious man known as The Fireman for help and protection.   This book is technically a horror novel, but it has a great sense of humor and light-heartedness to it as well.

     

    4.15 A Beginning at the EndA BEGINNING AT THE END
    By Mike Chen
    (2020)

    Six years after a global pandemic wiped out most of the planet’s population, the survivors are tentatively trying to rebuild their lives.  Krista, Moira, Rob, and Sunny are all brought together by circumstance, but as they get to know each other, they all discover they’ve been running from their pasts.  When a new pandemic looms, the group learns that it’s easier to survive when you have others you can turn to.

     

    4.15 World War ZWORLD WAR Z
    By Max Brooks
    (2006)

    Not only is this my favorite book about a killer pandemic, this is probably my favorite book period. And I don’t even like zombie fiction! Years after a zombie virus terrorized the globe, a lone reporter travels the world to interview presidents, generals, CEOs, and housewives alike about their experiences during World War Z. This book is less about zombie gore, and more about how the world would react to a deadly pandemic. Brooks definitely did his homework for this one, and the book feels so real that you may often forget that it’s about zombies, and not about our current social affairs. But never fear! This book takes place after all the bad stuff, so it’s actually a beacon of hope for dark times. (P.S. Since this is a collection of oral interviews, I highly recommend listening to the audiobook!) 

     

    4.15 Life as We Knew ItLIFE AS WE KNEW IT
    By Susan Pfeffer
    (2006)

    This YA book is not about a pandemic, but a world in which the moon has been hit by an meteor, knocking it closer in its orbit to Earth. Gravitation forces cause tidal waves of destruction, unprecedented volcanic activity, and earthquakes that ravage the world-over. Teenage Miranda and her family retreat into their home to survive in the cold and ash-covered world they now live in. Readers familiar with social distancing and quarantine will identify with the mental and emotional strain the characters endure as they hunker down in their home, worrying about food, supplies, and the effects of social isolation. The emotional reactions of the characters feel very real, and the story can often take bleak and distressing turns. Nevertheless, this is another hopeful read about how, even in a dark and apocalyptic world, we can still find love and hope to cling to.  

     
  • suspend holds

    If you’re a frequent library user, you might be familiar with this dilemma: there are tons of books you want to read, but other people want to read them too. So, like the industrious library user you are, you put them all on hold. 

    And then, because the universe doesn’t care about things like how long it takes to read a book, ALL YOUR HOLDS COME IN AT ONCE. And maybe you have more time to read than I do, but between my family, my work, and my need for some semblance of sleep, I haven’t yet been able to get through nine books in three weeks. But it’s painful to return something, knowing that you’ll go to the back of the line and you’ll wait another six weeks (or months!) to get that book again. 

    So what’s an intrepid reader to do? The answer is easy. Suspend your holds! 

    When you suspend a hold, you keep your place in line but allow others to bump in front of you until you’re ready for your hold. This works slightly differently in our catalog and with Libby (digital books), so I’ll walk you through both processes. 

    PHYSICAL MATERIALS 

    For materials managed exclusively through our catalog – print books, audiobooks on CD, etc. – the suspend holds feature keeps your place in line until a specific date. If you reach the top of the holds queue while your hold is suspended, other people will jump in front of you until the hold reactivates. 

    To suspend a hold through the library’s catalog, log in to your library account and click the “my holds” tab. Here you can see all of your digital holds. 

    Suspend Holds Pic 1

     

    Simply select the title you’d like to suspend, and choose a date when you’d like the hold to reactivate. This can be a little bit of a guessing game, but if you know that you’ve got a vacation or something concrete planned you can select a time when you know you’ll be available to give that book all the attention it deserves. If your reading schedule opens up unexpectedly, you can always cancel your hold suspension and you will immediately start working your way up the hold list again. 

    Suspend Holds Pic 2

     

    DIGITAL MATERIALS THROUGH LIBBY 

    If you do some of your reading through Libby by Overdrive (and if you don’t…why not? It’s amazing!), the Libby app has its own hold suspension system. It works similarly; you keep working your way up the hold queue while your hold is suspended, and if you reach the top slot Libby will allow one person at a time ahead of you until your hold is reactivated. To suspend a hold in Libby, go to your shelf and then your holds tab. Click on the red/blue “manage hold” square on the title you’d like to suspend. 

    suspend holds pic 3

     

    From here you can cancel or suspend your hold. I suggest you suspend.

    suspend holds pic 4

     

    This is now the step that doesn’t feel intuitive to me. You will be taken to a screen that gives you some information about your hold; click on the button in the lower right corner that says “active”, and then choose how long you’d like to suspend your hold. 

    suspend holds pic 5

     

    You will then be given a confirmation screen. If you immediately regret your decision, you can click “update hold suspension” and go back and rethink your life choices. 

    suspend holds pic 6

     

    Suspending holds is still a bit of a guessing game; unless you’re really diligent about knowing your place in every hold queue, there’s still a chance that your best-laid hold suspensions will all activate at the same time and you’ll still need to figure out how you can listen to a 48-hour audiobook in three days and still sleep and interact with other humans (I’m going to go ahead and tell you that you can’t. It’s just impossible. Forego human contact or resign yourself to jumping back into that hold queue.). 

    Still, it’s a tool in your belt. Place holds with abandon, and use the suspend feature wrangle them into a manageable state. Your personal reading queue will thank you. 

     
  • meet libby 01

     

    I have a new best friend, and her name is Libby. 

    For a long time, I have loved checking out eBooks and downloadable audiobooks from the library. I love that it's fast! I love that it's free! I don't always love that things automatically get returned at the end of three weeks whether I'm finished or not, but I do love that it's impossible to get late fees on electronic materials. I love our library's selection through OverDrive. 

    But I'm going to be honest for a second: I haven't always loved OverDrive's interface. It often feels like there are a few too many steps to get to a point where I can actually listen on my phone. How do I get to my bookshelf again? As a champion for utilizing these resources, I've always felt like the hurdles were worth it, but I completely understand how new users might get frustrated with the numerous steps it can take to get from finding an eBook to actually reading it. 

    But now Libby is here, and Libby is different.

    Libby by OverDrive is OverDrive's new, streamlined app that eliminates all the things I hated about checking out eBooks and Audiobooks. Libby remembers your library card so you don't have to sign in every time. Libby can remember that you want eBooks sent to your Kindle or iPad but audiobooks downloaded on your phone, and she does it right every time.

    With Libby, you're a search and a click away from reading or listening to the book you want. The steps go like this: 

    1. Install the Libby by OverDrive App on your device. 
    2. Search for your library and sign in with your current library card (Libby can even remember more than one card and toggle between them, if you'd like). You only have to do this step once. 
    3. Search for a title you're interested in. 
    4. If the title is available, tap "borrow." Libby will send the book to your bookshelf according to your preferences. 
    5. Once you've borrowed a title, you can go to your bookshelf to start reading or listening immediately, or you can keep browsing. 

    Libby is still part of the OverDrive family, which means that you'll see the same collection you've always seen in OverDrive, with new titles added all the time. There are few features that don't sync up with OverDrive's old app (like recommending purchases to the library), but if all you're doing in the OverDrive app is reading or listening to books, you're going to love Libby. 

    She's my best friend, but I'm happy to share. Happy reading!

  • Mindfulness for Teens

    High school can be a really stressful time for teens. Between hormones, friends, technology, and prepping for college, it can be a whirlwind fraught with obstacles. Add to that COVID-19 (CoronaVirus), school closure, missing friends and teachers, and you have a very difficult environment for teens to grow up in.

    One practice that can help teens to deal with these stresses is being mindful. Research shows people who practice mindfulness and meditate every day are happier, more focused, and have better memory.[1] If you are trying to navigate in these crazy times and are a teen or know a teen who could use some resources for mindfulness, this blog is for you!

    Here are five eBook resources from Overdrive geared toward teens that can help you build resiliency and stay hopeful and happy.

    5.6 Mindfulness and MeditationMINDFULNESS AND MEDITATION: HANDLING LIFE WITH A CALM AND FOCUSED MIND
    By Whitney Stewart
    (2020)

    Author Whitney Stewart introduces readers to the practice of mindfulness. With its roots in ancient Buddhist teachings, mindfulness--the practice of purposefully focusing attention on the present moment--can change a person's approach to stress, develop skills to handle anxiety and depression, and provide a sense of awareness and belonging. This is a short book with really great research to back up the practices. It is written specifically for young adults with topics like mindfulness before bed, mindfulness with your phone, and mindfulness at social gatherings.   

     

    5.6 Letting GoLETTING GO: A GIRL’S GUIDE TO BREAKING FREE OF STRESS AND ANXIETY
    By Christine Fonseca
    (2017)

    This book has everything you need to help you understand and manage the very real pressures you're facing from life. Designed to provide strategies for managing stress and anxiety, this book is filled with practical evidence-based advice and stories from teen and young adult women like you who have found ways to manage their anxieties. What I love is that every chapter features a discussion of different types of stress and anxiety so you can understand better what you're experiencing, activities to help you remember all the things you love about yourself and to help you understand yourself better, strategies for combating both stress and anxiety, and a stories of other girls who've learned to move past their stress and love their lives— and themselves — to the fullest. 

     

    5.6 Mindfulness for Teen AnxietyMINDFULNESS FOR TEEN ANXIETY: A WORKBOOK FOR OVERCOMING ANXIETY AT HOME, AT SCHOOL, AND EVERYWHERE ELSE
    By Christopher Willard
    (2014) 

    Psychologist and learning specialist Christopher Willard offers teens like you proven-effective, mindfulness-based practices to help you cope with your anxiety, identify common triggers (such as dating or school performance), learn valuable time-management skills, and feel calmer at home, at school, and with friends. The workbook structure allows you to answer questions and really think through your experiences.  

     

    5.6 The Anxiety Survival Guide for TeensTHE ANXIETY SURVIVAL GUIDE FOR TEENS: CBT SKILLS TO OVERCOME FEAR, WORRY, AND PANIC
    By Jennifer Shannon
    (2015)

    Based in cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), this book helps you identify your "monkey mind"—the primitive part of the brain where anxious thoughts arise. There are lots of illustrations that help explain practical strategies for handling even the toughest situations that previously caused you to feel anxious or worried. If you're ready to feel more independent, more confident, and be your best, this unique book will show you how.

     

    5.6 Be Mindful and Stress LessBE MINDFUL & STRESS LESS
    By Gina Biegel, MA, LMFT
    (2018)

    Life cab really tough when you are pulled in all sorts of directions. From family, to school, to dating, you can feel pretty stressed out. This book provides simple accessible mindfulness-based practices will help bring you relief and ease right away. It also teaches you self-care that helps calm the anxiety and stress. It like a life-hack to get you through even the toughest days.   

     

    [1] Stewart, W. (2020). Mindfulness and meditation: Handling life with a calm and focused mind. Twenty First-Century Books: Minneapolis Minnesota.

  • overdrive

     Can we say it enough? Overdrive is awesome! So here’s another shameless plug.

    Even though I use Overdrive almost daily, I’ll be the first to admit that the process of signing into the app and actually downloading titles isn’t the most user-friendly. But don’t give up! Overdrive provides a platform for ebooks and audiobooks, complimenting and expanding the library’s physical collection.  

    Here’s a beginner’s guide to using this great library resource:

    Overdrive Logo1- Download the Overdrive app onto your favorite device.

    Overdrive can be accessed on a desktop computer, but the easiest way is to download the app onto a phone or tablet.

     

     

     

    Overdrive 22- Sign into the app using the “SIGN IN” option.

    Your account was created when you signed up for a library card since the state of Utah has paid for the use of Overdrive for all Utah library card holders. The Provo library uses some of its budget to make additional items available to Provo City Library patrons. 

    You will be asked to sign in with your library card number and PIN.

     

     

     

     

    Overdrive 3.33 - Sign into Utah's Online Library.

    Once you’ve selected your library and signed into the app, you will be asked to use the same information to sign into Utah’s Online Library. This is the database Overdrive draws from.  

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Overdrive 44 – Find your bookshelf.

    After all that signing in, you can tap on the 3-line menu icon in the upper left corner and go to your bookshelf. It will be empty and waiting.  

    If you choose “Add a title,” you will be taken back to Utah’s Online Library to search for materials.  

    When items have been downloaded, they will conveniently appear on this Bookshelf page. 

     

     

     

     

    Overdrive 55 – Search for something amazing.

    The easiest way to find something on Utah’s Online Library is to type the title directly into the search box.  

    If you are just browsing, you can search collections by tapping the menu icon in the upper right corner.  

    If your search brings up too many possibilities, you can filter results. My favorite way to narrow down results is to filter by type, ebook or audiobook, and then by availability.  

    Tap interesting titles to see a summary, or to read/hear a sample. 

     

     

    Overdrive 66- Check something out.

    Just like a physical book checked out from the library, materials available through Overdrive usually have a limited number of copies.  

    If a title is available, you can choose “borrow,” and the screen will send you to the Loans page where the item can be downloaded to the app for reading or listening.  

    If a title is unavailable, you can choose “place a hold,” and will be directed to the Holds page. When a book becomes available that you have put on hold, it will be automatically checked out to you.  

    One of the great things about overdrive is you never have to worry about late fees. When the lending period has expired, the ebook or audiobook is automatically returned.  

    *NOTE: you can have 10 items checked-out and 5 on hold at any one time

    Now you can use this amazing resource! Please come visit the library with further questions or to get great recommendations. Remember that the library’s online catalog will list if an item you're searching for is available on Overdrive. 

  • Ebook Reading

    Everything feels a bit dystopian right now with the closures and cancellations to stop the spread of the Coronavirus. Many are working from home and self-isolating, and with schools and businesses closed, there seems to be more time for what is most important. Like reading and listening to audiobooks. With a library card and a PIN you have access to several resources that can be really useful right about now. So, if the Corona virus has you down, here are some resources that you can still use even while the library is closed.

    OVERDRIVE

    Download best-selling audiobooks, eBooks, and magazines from Overdrive 24/7 to your computer or laptop at home. The database dashboard can be reached by going to provolibrary.com, and then going to the Learn tab. Then you can choose the option of Research Databases from the drop-down menu. This brings up all the library’s online databases and subscriptions. Choose the first option of eBooks and Audiobooks. This gives you access to Overdrive. 

    One of the great things about Overdrive is that they group eBooks and Audiobooks not only by genre but by what is available all of the time. That means no waiting to read or listen! That is going to be a go to list for you. You can browse for eBooks and Audiobooks on other lists too. For example, Overdrive has several lists that coincide with Women’s History month. 

    LIBBY

    Libby is Overdrive’s app for listening to audiobooks and reading eBooks on your phone. It is streamlined to be more intuitive and easier to use. Just go to the app store or Google Play and download the app. Once you have it downloaded, you will link your card to your account. It will ask for your library, your library card number, and your four digit PIN. Then you can start downloading. You can set your preferences for just eBooks or just Audiobooks. You can also set it so that you will only see what is available so you don’t have to place any holds for items. 

    Each family member’s card can be added to the app. Then each person can check out up to ten items and put up to seven items on hold on their devices. If you are sharing one device as a family, all of the items downloaded by each family member will be available.

    This is a time of uncertainty. But you can be certain about at least one thing. The Provo City Library is still committed to providing services that will help you and your family get through. 

  • Fantasy Bridge 

    I have to be honest, recently I found myself in a predicament. This last year, I decided to read the Wheel of Time series for the first time. I was just about to read book four of fourteen but I found that I needed a little break. Of course I still had every plan in finishing (I need to have it all done by the time the Amazon Prime series comes out after all) but don’t we all need a change of pace now and then?

    And I did take my break; I had a lot of fun doing it. But, to my horror, the book I used to take a breath from The Wheel of Time was also part of a different series.  Now I was indebted to two book series at once. And, if I’m being honest with myself, I probably now have three or four to juggle. I didn’t think it through. The change of pace I was searching for turned into further commitment.

    Lucky for all of you, I decided to spare you all this pain. When you need a change of pace, a momentary break in your great literary journey, do yourself a favor and read one of these excellent stand-alone books. You can thank me later.

    4.17 The Goblin EmperorTHE GOBLIN EMPEROR
    By Katherine Addison
    (2014)

    This novel won the Locus Award for Best Fantasy and was nominated for the Nebula, Hugo, and World Fantasy awards. The book follows Maia, youngest and least-favored son of the Emperor of the Elflands and of mixed Elven and Goblin heritage, unexpectedly ascends to the throne after his father and half-brothers are killed in an airship crash. He now has no choice but to take the throne. Surrounded by sycophants eager to curry favor with the naïve new emperor, and overwhelmed by the burdens of his new life, he can trust nobody.

     

    4.17 Dooms Day BookDOOMSDAY BOOK
    By Connie Willis
    (1992)

    This novel, considered a masterpiece in storytelling, won both the Hugo and Nebula award and presents a woman traveling through time. Willis sets her book in a near in which historians conduct field work by traveling into the past as observers. The research is conducted at the University of Oxford, in mid-21st century England. In this book, the narration revolves around an influenza epidemic in 2054 and the Black Plague in 1348. Historian Kivrin is one historian who gets stuck back int time trying to learn and help her people.

     
     

    4.17 Under HeavenUNDER HEAVEN
    By Guy Gavriel Kay
    (2010)

    Set in a fantasied Tang China and based on a fictionalized version of the An Shi Rebellion, Under Heaven follows Shen Tai, the second son of a renowned general of Kitai, as he is given, in recognition of his service to the Emperor of Kitai, a mysterious and dangerous gift: 250 Sardian horses. Wisely the gift comes with the stipulation that the horses must be claimed in person. Otherwise, he would probably be dead already.

     

    4.17 AnathemANATHEM
    By Neal Stephenson
    (2008)

    Anathem takes place on the fictional planet Arbre. It follows the account of Fraa Erasmas of the Concent of Saunt Edhar, who begins the tale as an unassuming avout trying to keep up with his studies, and by the end has traversed continents and seas, faced extraordinary dangers, met unexpected persons, and perhaps even saved the world as he knows it.

     

    4.17 The Library at Mount CharTHE LIBRARY AT MOUNT CHAR
    By Scott Hawkins
    (2015)

    An unexplained catastrophe destroys part of a town, but twelve children survive. The survivors are "adopted" and raised by a powerful, god-like figure called Father. Together they live in "the Library", an extensive pyramid structured building filled with books cataloging all knowledge of the universe - past, present and future. Now, Father is missing—perhaps even dead—and the Library that holds his secrets stands unguarded. And with it, control over all of creation.

     
  • When Book Groups Cant Meet 

    Being stuck at home can disrupt a lot of day-to-day life, and book clubs are no exception!  If you need to stay home, but are missing the ability to meet and connect with others (especially to discuss books!), there are a few tools that can help.

    Group Chat and Videoconference Software

    There are a few free products that allow groups to communicate together instantly without the need for long email threads.  Both Slack and Facebook, among others, have instant messaging service that can be used on devices or computers, and instant message groups can be created that can chat together.  There are also several videoconferencing software options, although many of them will only facilitate one-to-one video calls.  Skype can broadcast free video calls to groups of up to 25 individuals, and can also be used for group chats and photo and file sharing.  For multiple video streams, Zoom can pull in up to 50 streams at the same time.  It offers video, audio, and screensharing, as well as group messaging, although there is a time limit for the free version.  Freeconferencecall also provides teleconferencing for up to 24 people, and as an added bonus, calls can be recorded for viewing later on.

    What about reading a book together?

    Getting enough copies of a book can be difficult when supplies and mobility are limited, but thanks to Overdrive's Always Available Audiobooks, everyone in your book club can still access books!  "Always Available" means that there are no waiting lists and no check-out limits on individual titles.  Everyone in your group can check them out and start listening right now!  Overdrive maintains 75 Always Available Audiobooks (the list changes periodically to allow for fresh titles).  Currently, 10 of those titles are books included in the Provo City Library’s book club collection, and following is a list of those titles and links to our discussion guides with questions that can help facilitate your group’s discussion.

    3.18 The Goose GirlTHE GOOSE GIRL
    By Shannon Hale
    (2003)

    The Goose Girl Discussion Guide

     

    3.18 The Screwtape LettersTHE SCREWTAPE LETTERS
    By C.S. Lewis
    (1942)

    The Screwtape Letters Discussion Guide

     

    3.18 The Count of Monte CristoTHE COUNT OF MONTE CRISTO
    By Alexandre Dumas
    (1844)

    The Count of Monte Cristo Discussion Guide

     

    3.18 The Hiding PlaceTHE HIDING PLACE
    By Corrie Ten Boom
    (1971)

    The Hiding Place Discussion Guide

     

    3.18 Next Year in HavanaNEXT YEAR IN HAVANA
    By Chanel Cleeton
    (2018)

    Next Year in Havana Discussion Guide

     

    3.18 Nothing to EnvyNOTHING TO ENVY
    By Barbara Demick
    (2009)

    Nothing to Envy Discussion Guide

     

    3.18 Little WomenLITTLE WOMEN
    By Louisa May Alcott
    (1868)

    Little Women Discussion Guide

     

    3.18 The Life changing Magic of Tidying UpTHE LIFE-CHANGING MAGIC OF TIDYING UP
    By Marie Kondo
    (2014)

    The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up Discussion Guide

     

    3.18 The Year of LessTHE YEAR OF LESS
    By Cait Flanders
    (2018)

    The Year of Less Discussion Guide

     

    3.18 Pride and PrejudicePRIDE AND PREJUDICE
    By Jane Austen
    (1813)

    Pride and Prejudice Discussion Guide