The Provo City Library will reopen June 1 with limited hours. You can return items to our outside book drops during curbside hours.
The Provo City Library will reopen June 1 with limited hours. You can return items to our outside book drops during curbside hours.
 

 

Cover Art

  •  rainbow books

    You may have been told not to judge a book by its cover, but for today we’re encouraging it.  Book lovers know that there is nothing quite like an aesthetically-pleasing, well-organized book shelf. One of the most abiding trends in book organization is sorting your books to look like a rainbow and we’re here for it. While we won’t be reorganizing the library shelves into a rainbow anytime soon, here are some great and colorful reads if you want to make your own shelves a little more ROY G BIV 

    3.2 The Wedding DateTHE WEDDING DATE
    By Jasmine Guillory
    (2018)

     

    3.2 Me Before YouME BEFORE YOU
    By Jojo Moyes
    (2012)

     

    3.2 Green Eggs and HamGREEN EGGS AND HAM
    By Dr. Seuss
    (1960)

     

    3.2 The Poisonwood BibleTHE POISONWOOD BIBLE: A NOVEL 
    By Barbara Kingsolver
    (1998)

     

    3.2 GhostGHOST
    By Jason Reynolds
    (2016)

     

    3.2 WatchmenWATCHMEN
    By Alan Moore
    (2014)

     

    3.2 The Radium GirlsTHE RADIUM GIRLS: THE DARK STORY OF AMERICA'S SHINING WOMEN
    By Kate Moore
    (2017)

     

    3.2 Evvie Drake Starts OverEVIE DRAKE STARTS OVER: A NOVEL
    By Linda Holmes
    (2019)

     

    3.2 Why Not MeWHY NOT ME?
    By Mindy Kaling
    (2015)

     

    3.2 All The Light We Cannot SeeALL THE LIGHT WE CANNOT SEE: A NOVEL
    By Anthony Doerr
    (2014)

     

    3.2 An Absolutely Remarkable ThingAN ABSOLUTELY REMARKABLE THING: A NOVEL
    By Hank Green
    (2018)

     

    3.2 EchoECHO
    By Pam Munoz Ryan
    (2015)

     

    3.2 That Inevitable Victorian ThingTHAT INEVITABLE VICTORIAN THING
    By E.K. Johnston
    (2017)

     

    3.2 Toil and TroubleTOIL & TROUBLE: 15 TALES OF WOMEN & WITCHCRAFT
    By Tess Sharpe
    (2018)  

     
  • Covering the Artists 

    Book illustration has always been a great love of mine. As I child, I was always taken in by these drawings, especially in the fairy tales I read. As I got older, and the books I read had less and less pictures, but I was still fascinated by the pictures found on the covers of the books I read. To this day, I definitely have a weakness for “judging a book by its cover.” Part of that weakness is because some of my favorite books had covers illustrated by the same artists who created the picture books I read as a child. In celebration of these books, I have compiled a list of the best illustrators whose work is enjoyed by readers of all ages.  

    Kinuko Y. Craft

    8.2 Baba Yaga and Vasilisa the BraveBABA YAGA AND VASILISA THE BRAVE
    By Marianna Mayer
    (1994) 

     

    8.2 Winter RoseWINTER ROSE
    By Patricia A. McKillip
    (1996)

    Also known professionally as K.Y. Craft, Kinuko studied fine arts in Ishikawa, Japan. After graduating in 1962, she moved to Chicago, studying and working at local design studios. Her work is heavily influenced by traditional European masters, as well as 19th century Romanticism and Symbolism. In addition to being published in magazines like Time, her work has also been displayed at the The National Portrait Gallery in Washington, D.C.  

     

    Trina Schart Hyman

    8.2 Hershel and the Hannukah GoblinsHERSHEL AND THE HANUKKAH GOBLINS
    By Eric A. Kimmel
    (1989) 

     

    8.2 A Hidden MagicA HIDDEN MAGIC
    By Vivian Vande Velde
    (1985)

    One of the most applauded illustrators of her generation, Trina was awarded the Caldecott medal in 1984, the highest achievement for illustration in the U.S. She would go on to win three additional Caldecott awards for her work. Though she would also study at institutes in Boston and Stockholm, she was originally born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Sadly, she passed away in 2004, but not without leaving a legacy of revered work.  

     

    Leo and Diane Dillon

    8.2 The People Could FlyTHE PEOPLE COULD FLY
    By Virginia Hamilton
    (2004) 

     

    8.2 AbhorsenABHORSEN
    By Garth Nix
    (2003)

    This husband and wife have worked together to create award-winning illustrations. Also awarded the Caldecott, they have the distinction of being the only consecutive winners — in 1976 and 1977. Each of their works is a collaboration between their styles. Occasionally, Lee Dillon, their son, a gifted sculptor, painter and craftsman, is also featured in their works.

     
  • I Judged that Cover 

    I’m sure we’ve all heard the saying, “Don’t judge a book by its cover.” Well, I’m here to tell you that it’s great advice! I can’t count how many books I almost didn’t read because my inner snark judged the cover. Fortunately for me, my inner snark doesn’t win every battle and I’ve found some really good stories by relying on friends’ recommendations rather than the cover.   Here are some fabulous books that I prejudged: 

    11.13 Along for the RideALONG FOR THE RIDE
    By Sarah Dessen
    (2009)

    I judged this cover because it posed three questions in my mind:

    1. How long did it take the two models to get in that precarious and unnatural position?

    2. Why is she wearing a dress while riding a bike?

    3. Where are her shoes?

    None of these questions were answered in the book, but it was still a fun read. 

    The story follows an insomniac named Auden. Tired of her mother’s antics, she decides to spend her summer vacation with her dad and his new wife. Her time is filled with working, making new friends, and catching the eye of Eli, a fellow insomniac with a tortured past. Can Auden and Eli help each other find hope and healing?

     

    11.13 Royal TargetROYAL TARGET
    By Tracie Hunter Abramson
    (2008)

    This cover gave off a James Bond meets The Princess Diaries vibe. An unlikely match that earned it a space on my “mustard and cheese” shelf (meaning this book puts together two elements that I like and has the potential to be really good or really bad). Fortunately, I found this book very enjoyable. 

    Janessa Rogers is a CIA agent that specializes in linguistics and security detail. When she’s assigned to protect the royal family of Meridia, she knows her skills will be put to the test. However, she never suspected her assignment would require her to go undercover as Prince Garrett’s fiancée.

     

    ALANNA: THE FIRST ADVENTURE11.13 Alanna
    By Tamora Pierce
    (1983)

    First of all, I would like the world to know that Tamora Pierce is one of my favorite authors. She’s amazing and the worlds she creates are beautiful and mesmerizing. That being said, this particular cover gave me pause. I mean, there’s A LOT I could say about this cover. But I’ll settle with: when your horse has better hair than you do, you know there’s a problem. 

    Alanna wants nothing more than to be a knight. When her father plans to send her off to a convent to learn magic, she decides it’s time to take action. She convinces her twin brother, Thom, to switch places with her. Alanna, now disguised, becomes a royal page and learns how hard she must work to achieve her dream.

     

    11.13 The Blue SwordTHE BLUE SWORD
    By Robin McKinley
    (1982)

    Why did I judge this cover? For two reasons:

    1. That horse (you know which one).

    2. The sword pictured is not, in fact, blue.You had one job, cover artist.

    Anyway, this is a Robin McKinley book and her work is always solid. I felt connected to her characters and thoroughly enjoyed the story. It’s a nice balance of action, plot, and character development. 

    Harry Crewe is a recently orphaned girl. She travels across the ocean to live with her brother in the Royal Province of Daria. After arriving, she is kidnapped by the king of the native Hill-folk and finds herself on an adventure that changes her life forever.

     

    11.13 Seeking PersephoneSEEKING PERSEPHONE
    By Sarah M. Eden
    (2011)

    I have a theory when it comes to this style of book covers: the number of Photoshop layers used directly correlates with the cheesiness level of writing (e.g., If you can easily see 7 layers, then the book will have a 7/10 cheese rating).  Eden proved my theory wrong. She proved it very wrong. This book is wonderful. It is well researched, gloriously written, and the sweet moments did not involve cheese. 

    The Duke of Kielder needs an heir but he is the most feared man in England. Persephone needs financial stability but that seems nigh impossible. To solve their problems, they settle upon a marriage of convenience. But will they get more than they bargained for?

     

    11.13 The Grand SophyTHE GRAND SOPHY
    By Georgette Heyer
    (1950)

    One of my best friends recommended this book to me. I borrowed her copy with this cover. Let me just say, I wondered what Belle from Beauty and the Beast was doing with a monkey and a guy that thought a green tailcoat was a good idea. I dragged my feet with starting this book, but once I did I couldn’t put it down.   

    Sophy Stanton-Lacy finds herself in her aunt’s household while her father goes away on business. Upon her arrival, she realizes how desperately the family needs her help. One cousin is engaged to a bore, another is in love with a poet, the young children need some fun, and her uncle is useless. Sophy wastes no time in meddling in their affairs to ensure a happy ending for all.

     

    There you have it! Six great books I never would have read had I allowed my inner snark to win. What are your favorite books with interesting cover art?