Claire

  • books of christmas

     

    Yes, any countdown in December must start at 12. Here’s our own 12 Days of Christmas picture book countdown:

    12 BOATS A BLINKING

    12 Washington

     

    THE TWELVE DAYS OF CHRISTMAS IN WASHINGTON 
    by John A. Nez  

     

     

    11 WRAPPINGS RUMPLED

    my puppy gave to me

     

    MY PUPPY GAVE TO ME
    by Cheryl Dannenbring   

     

     

     

    10 LABS A LEAPING

    12 days christmas dogs

     

    12 DAYS OF CHRISTMAS DOGS
    by Carolyn Conahan 

     

    9 MERMAIDS SINGING

    12 pirates christmas

     

    A PIRATES 12 DAYS OF CHRISTMAS
    by Philip Yates 

     

    8 MAIDS A MILKING

    12 Days of Christmas African

     

    12 DAYS OF CHRISTMAS
    by Rachel Isadora (African Illustrations) 

     

    7 SQUIRRELS SKIING

    12 Days Cabrera

     

    THE 12 DAYS OF CHRISTMAS
    by Jane Cabrera 

     

     

     

    6 TROMPOS GIRANDO

    pinata pine tree

     

    A PIÑATA IN A PINE TREE
    by Pat Mora 

     

     

    5 GOLDEN RINGS

    12 Days Pham

     

    THE TWELVE DAYS OF CHRISTMAS
    by LeUyen Pham (around the world)   

     

     

     

    4 CALLING BORGS

    12 bots christmas

     

    THE TWELVE BOTS OF CHRISTMAS
    by Nathan Hale 

     

     

    3 THISTLE DUSTERS

    firefly fir tree

     

    A FIREFLY IN A FIR TREE
    by Hilary Knight 

     

     

     

    2 TAWNY TABBIES

    12 cats christmas

     

    THE TWELVE DAYS OF CHRISTMAS CATS
    by Don Daily 

     

     

    AND A STINKY BABY MESSING WITH THE TREE

    12 worst days

     

    THE WORST TWELVE DAYS OF CHRISTMAS
    by Sudipta Bardhan-Quallen 

     

     

     

  • Jen Bryant

    According to Jen Bryant, the most important skills an author can have are patience, perseverance, a love of language, good observational skills, and self-discipline. This is reflected in what and how she writes. Jen Bryant’s many published books cover a wide variety of topics, both fiction and nonfiction, including poetry books and over a dozen biographies. She likes to find a subject that has been written about for adults and try to make that subject into something younger audiences would enjoy. In interviews Jen has said that she loves the researching process. It’s like a scavenger hunt to find the most interesting details about something true. When she researches a topic for one of her books, it is an extensive and exciting process that involves reading books and articles, watching movies, videos, and plays, giving interviews, and visiting museums, archives, special collections, and small towns where historic events occurred. Jen then takes all of this information and crafts beautiful, detailed, and personal picture books, biographies, and poems.  

    We are thrilled to host Jen Bryant at BYU’s Symposium on Books for Young Readers. Before she comes, check out some of her books.

    7.14 Six DotsSIX DOTS: A STORY OF YOUNG LOUIS BRAILLE
    Written by Jen Bryant
    Illustrated by Boris Kulikov
    (2016)

    An inspiring picture-book biography of Louis Braille--a blind boy so determined to read that he invented his own alphabet.

     

     

    7.11.17 A River of WordsA RIVER OF WORDS: THE STORY OF WILLIAM CARLOS WILLIAMS
    Written by Jen Bryant
    Illustrated by Melissa Sweet
    (2016)

    This picture book biography of William Carlos Williams traces childhood events that lead him to become a doctor and a poet.

     

    7.13 Pieces of GeorgiaPIECES OF GEORGIA
    By Jen Bryant
    (2007) 

    An accessible novel in poems, Pieces of Georgia offers an endearing protagonist-an aspiring artist, a grieving daughter, a struggling student, a genuine friend-and the poignant story of a broken family coming together.

     

     

     

    7.14 Ringside 1925RINGSIDE 1925: VIEWS FROM THE SCOPES TRIAL
    By Jen Bryant
    (2007) 

    The year is 1925, and the students of Dayton, Tennessee, are ready for a summer of fishing, swimming, and drinking root beer floats at Robinson's Drugstore. But when their science teacher, J. T. Scopes, is arrested for having taught Darwin's theory of evolution, it seems it won't be an ordinary summer in Dayton.

     

     

    7.14 A Splash of RedA SPLASH OF RED: THE LIFE AND ART OF HORACE PIPPIN
    By Jen Bryant
    Illustrated by Melissa Sweet
    (2009) 

    Presents an illustrated introduction to the life and work of artist Horace Pippin, describing his childhood love for drawing and the World War I injury that challenged his career.

     

     

    7.13 The Fortune of Carmen NavarroFORTUNE OF CARMEN NAVARRO
    By Jen Bryant
    (2011) 

    Inspired by the novella and opera Carmen, Jen Bryant creates a strong-minded and alluring heroine in this contemporary tale of tragic love

     

     

     

  • covers

     

    I absolutely, definitely judge books by their covers. I’m always scanning the shelves (and the floor, and patron’s hands) for covers that are unique in design and childlike in sensibility. When a book’s cover catches my eye, I pick it up. That is how I choose the books I want to read. It’s not a perfect approach. But I have found that form usually follows function and more often than not, an interesting book cover contains an interesting story inside.  

    Here are five books I simply happened across in the children’s section: books I'd never heard of before, but which had graphically bold or visually detailed covers that I was drawn to. Once I opened up these books, I found stories and illustrations inside that confirmed what the covers suggested. Not all books should be judged by their covers, but it’s working out pretty well for me so far.  

    (Interestingly, all five of these books are by Japanese authors and illustrators.)              

    issun boshiISSUN BOSHI
    By Icinori    
    (2014)

    Issun Boshi is the first book I checked out as a librarian. I was sucked in by the cover illustration boldly rendered in orange, teal, yellow, and black with stark negative space. I picked it up partially because I couldn’t tell how old it was from looking at the cover. Like a lot of less familiar folktales, ISSUN BOSHI feels at once fresh and ancient. It is the story of a one-inch tall boy who leaves home to find adventure, armed with a rice bowl and a needle. The words and images create a striking picture book of unusual peril but also unusual subtlety.

     

         

    you are my best friendYOU ARE MY BEST FRIEND
    By Tatsuya Miyanishi    
    (2004) 

    This cover is densely patterned, boldly colored, and full of glaring dinosaurs—which makes its sweet title intriguing. Inside, we get the story of a destructive and violent Tyrannosaurus who learns about gratitude and friendship when the Elasmosaurus saves his life. I like that YOU ARE MY BEST FRIEND is extremely aware of its audience, both in word and image. It feels like a story a child would tell accompanied by drawings a child would draw, but with the finesse and sophistication of a hugely talented adult author/illustrator.      

                         

    annos counting bookANNO’S COUNTING BOOK
    By Mitsumasa Anno
    (1975)  

    I liked the careful little scene on the cover of Anno’s Counting Book and was rewarded with an exceptional presentation of natural mathematics inside. The development of a village and its countryside is depicted only with pictures and numbers. The landscape and its inhabitants change and expand and multiply in patterns and sequences throughout seasons of the year. Anno’s delicate little drawings are full of life and detail. Every plant, animal, person, and building is worth discovering because each countable feature (windows, branches, petals) is significant in relation to everything else.        

     

    kuma kumaKUMA KUMA CHAN’S HOME
    By Kazue Takahashi  
    (2016) 

    Sometimes just the color of a book jacket or the typeface of the title or even the size of a book is enough to make me want to pick it up. This slim little pale pink book fit so nicely in my hands - how could I resist? KUMA KUMA CHAN’S HOME is a tiny book, sweetly and simply rendered, about an imperfect but ultimately nice visit between friends. The story, like the cover art, is understated, gentle, and minimal.    

           

    how to draw almost everythingHOW TO DRAW ALMOST EVERYTHING
    By Chika Miyata  
    (2016) 

    The childlike drawing style featured on the cover of HOW TO DRAW ALMOST EVERYTHING feels similar to Anno’s, which is probably why this book caught my attention. Invitingly simple but engagingly specific, this “Illustrated Sourcebook” teaches the reader how to doodle just about anything you might need to doodle. The step-by-step illustrations are encouraging and accessible and the book really does cover a huge breadth of subjects: animals, plants, faces, clothing, foods, vehicles, emotions, actions.  

     

  • KidsCameras FB

    We’re excited to tell you about the Provo Library’s newest children’s program -- Kids & Cameras! This is a class for 9-12 year olds who are interested in learning about movies and trying their hand at the many different elements of filmmaking.  

    Kids experience a lot of media but not very much education about media. In Kids & Cameras we learn the language with which to talk about movies, and we learn the skills to create our own videos. The basic format is as follows: we talk about a filmmaking concept/practice/skill, and then watch short films or film excerpts demonstrating the idea. After that, the kids divide into small groups and are given mini assignments to complete. Filmmaking involves a lot of problem solving, experimenting, and resourcefulness. This program is a great place to practice collaboration, exercise creativity, and learn technical skills. 

    Kids & Cameras takes place on Wednesdays from 7:00 PM - 8:00 PM in the Story Room. Registration for this program opens on Mondays at 10:00 AM. There is room for 16 students every week.   

    We teach Camera Basics and an Editing Basics every month, so that new kids can join in during any time of year. The Camera Basics and Editing Basics classes are prerequisites to the more advanced “outbreak” classes that will start in October. Some of these classes include composition, monster movies, and stop motion animation! Check the calendar to see which class is being offered that week.   

    We’re so excited for this new program and hope to see you there! In the meantime, here are some cool resources you can check out from the library or online: 

    9.27 The Kids Should See ThisTHE KIDS SHOULD SEE THIS

    This site is not specifically about filmmaking, but it’s a really great collection of 3,000 “not-made-for-kids, but perfect for them” videos, many of which are great examples of filmmaking principles. 

     

     

    9.27 Brick FlicksBRICK FLICKS 
    Sarah Herman
    2014

    A comprehensive guide to making your own stop-motion LEGO movies 

     

     

     

    9.27 Childrens Book of MoviesTHE CHILDREN'S BOOK OF MOVIES 
    Ann Baggaley
    2014

    Explore the magical, behind-the-scenes world of the movies.  

     

     

     

    9.27 Learn to Speak FilmLEARN TO SPEAK FILM 
    Michael Glassbourg
    2013

    A guide to creating, promoting & screening your movies.  

     

     

  • displays

    Lining the entrance of the Children’s Department are ten glass display cases. These display cases are one of the ways we keep things interesting over here—with a six week rotation schedule, they are changing all the time.  

    Some of the display cases show off what’s going on in our kids’ programs. One case shows the crafts for Library Kids Jr and Sr. as well as the Monday night crafts that are scheduled for the month; while another is used for our boy and girl book clubs. We have a LEGO club display case too—you can tell how popular it is by the amount of fingerprints on the glass! Sometimes we’ll even use a display case as an I Spy passive program where children can earn a prize by finding hidden items. 

    The other display cases are dedicated to books. Each librarian thinks of a theme or topic or genre to tie together their book selections. This can be anything from the Super Bowl to fairies to the works of a visiting author. Anything goes! We then find at least a dozen related books that we think are worth reading to fill up the shelves. Finally, we get snazzy. Using tape, fishing line, wrapping paper, hats, action figures, stuffed animals, die cut letters, tassels, bunting, and anything else we can get our hands on, we try to make our displays look fun and exciting.  

    When the display case is filled in and locked up, we write all about it in a post on the Provo Library Children’s Book Review Blog. If you click on the “display” tag on the right side of the site, you’ll see every display case we’ve created over the last few years. 

    Most importantly: Please, feel free to ask a librarian if you want to check out a book from a display! We are happy to help you. Tell us what caught your eye and we’ll unlock the case, hand over the book, and find a new one to fill in the empty space. Think of our display cases as a recommendation from us to you: just another way to show how much affection we feel for our patrons.