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01 Jan Book Sale FB

It’s book sale time! That time when you can buy 15 books for the price of one! 

We will be open from 10:00 am to 6:00 pm. That gives you eight hours of treasure hunting, so here are five tips to help you get the most out of this one-day event:

1. Know the lay of the land

There are four general areas of the book sale. As you come into the ballroom, through the south entrance...

  • The first couple rows will be children’s materials.

  • The middle few rows will have adult and teen fiction titles.

  • The last couple of rows will have adult and teen nonfiction titles.

  • The south end of the ballroom will hold special items including magazines, movies, music, and more.

Beyond these very general categories, we do not sort our books. This means you should give yourself plenty of time to search for things you may want.

2. Arrive early...but maybe drop in a few times throughout the day

There are some truly amazing finds among the hundreds of boxes of books available at our sales.  Sometimes the best stuff goes fast, so arriving early can be a very good idea. However, as books fly off the tables, we replace them with more boxes so that what is available for purchase changes throughout the day. You can find great stuff all day long!

3. Know what's available and why

Many people wonder where all these books come from. Well, they come from a couple of places: 

  • Discards – these are books that were part of our collection but have been discarded.  We discard books if they are falling apart, if they are not popular, or if we have too many copies. We replace these books with newer copies or titles so that our collection stays in good condition.

  • Donations – we receive many generous donations of books throughout the year. Sometimes we add these donations to our collection which helps us buy even more books for our patrons. But sometimes, we already have copies or the books don’t fit with our collection, so we sell them at the book sale and use the proceeds to provide programs for our patrons.

You can tell the difference between these two categories by looking at the spine to see if it has a spine label or any other stickers or markings showing the library owned the book previously. Donations will usually be free of these labels and they often look newer and have seen less use. So, if you're looking for "like new" kinds of books, skip the ones with spine labels; if you're looking for well-loved but popular books, searching through library discards might be the way to go (you'll often find a Harry Potter or Diary of a Wimpy Kid book hanging out in a box of discards just because it's circulated so many times!). 

4. Be prepared with help and bags

With over 23,000 items on display for sale, you may need to bring a little help to sort and search. Gather your posse and attack the job together. If you know what you're looking for, divide and conquer! Also, bring bags and boxes to haul away your booty. We supply some shopping bags and boxes, but eliminate any uncertainty and bring your own reinforced modes of transportation. Books are awesome…but they are also heavy!

5. Occasional end of the day deals

Toward the last hour or so of each sale we often start thinking about the big job of hauling all the leftover books back down to the basement for storage until the next sale. That’s a big job, and sometimes we like to make it smaller by lowering the prices of the books. So, consider coming back at the end to see what additional discoveries you can make! There's a possibility they'll be even cheaper then.

Percy

What teen or pre-teen hasn’t read the PERCY JACKSON novels? They're fast paced and full of fun characters bursting with attitude and heart. Luckily, there is a lot to read about in the Percy Jackson world; 5 books in the first series, 5 in the second, and three so far in the TRIALS OF APOLLO spin off, not to mention THE KANE CHRONICLES and the adventures of MAGNUS CHASE.

But like all good things, there is an end to the wonderful books of Rick Riordan. So if you or your child have read all of them, what do you read next? Here are my top five Rick Riordan read-alikes. 

1.21 Lokis WolvesLOKI’S WOLVES
By Kelley Armstrong
(2013)

Matt Thorsen is a direct descendant of the order-keeping god Thor, and his classmates Fen and Laurie Brekke are descendants of the trickster god Loki. When Ragnarok--the apocalypse--threatens, the human descendants of the gods must reconcile their differences and fight monsters to stop the end of the world. 

 

1.21 Aru ShahARU SHAH AND THE END OF TIME
By Roshani Chokshi
(2018)

Aru Shah's mother is the curator of a museum of Indian antiquities. She has always told Aru that the old lamp in one of the exhibit rooms is cursed, and if someone lit it a demon would appear. Aru doesn't believe her, of course, until one day when "friends" dare her to light the lamp. With her one bad choice, Aru is swept into a world of the Hindu gods, and discovers more about her family than she had ever imagined. 

 

1.18 The Serpents SecretTHE SERPENT’S SECRET
By Sayantani Dasgupta
(2018)

Up until her twelfth birthday, Kiranmala considered herself an ordinary sixth-grader in Parsippany, New Jersey, but then her parents disappear and a drooling rakkhosh demon shows up in her kitchen. Soon she is swept into another dimension full of magic, winged horses, talking birds (very annoying), and cute princes--and somehow Kiranmala needs to sort it all out, find her parents, and basically save the world. 

 

1.21 Where the Mountain Meets the MoonWHERE THE MOUNTAIN MEETS THE MOON
By Grace Lin
(2009)

Minli lives in a poor village suffering from a long standing drought. When she buys a magical goldfish, she is swept away on a quest with a dragon who cannot fly to find the Old Man of the Moon. Only he can tell her how to bring life to Fruitless Mountain and freshness to Jade River. 

 

1.21 Mark of the ThiefMARK OF THE THIEF
By Jennifer Nielson
(2015)

When Nic, a slave in the mines outside of Rome, is forced to enter a sealed cavern containing the lost treasures of Julius Caesar, he finds much more than gold and gemstones. He discovers an ancient bulla, an amulet that belonged to the great caesar, filled with a magic once reserved for the gods--magic some Romans would kill for. 

 

Sullivan

My father and I have a special kind of two person book club. The two of us read the same books (usually ones that he’ll find for me) and then we nerd out about them together. One day when we were searching for a new fantasy novel, he came across an author who was advertising the fact that his books are all the fun of fantasy without any of the explicit stuff. We jumped on board, and thank goodness we did.

If you have heard of Michael J. Sullivan, I wouldn’t be surprised. His latest series THE LEGENDS OF THE FIRST EMPIRE has become a hit, especially in the fantasy community. If you haven’t heard of him, then stick around, because you are about to meet your new favorite author.

Sullivan has written a full series and is in the middle of two more, all of which are set in the same magical world called Elan. The feeling of the novels is very Tolkienesque, fit with elves, dwarves, and wizards, but also with his own great twists. He weaves his story with myths, legends, and religions that are unique to the world in which he’s built.

Best of all, he writes all of the books in a series before publishing them, a two-fold gift. For one, the intriguing threads he creates are perfectly weaved throughout, from beginning to end. And secondly, this way we don’t have to sit around, staring at his Goodreads profile and waiting for him to give us some kind of sign for when the next book is coming out (looking at you, Patrick Rothfuss).

One of my favorite things about Sullivan is how approachable he is. At the beginning of every book, he includes an author’s note, asking for you to shoot him an email with feedback. On top of this, his Goodreads profile is extremely active. At one time I emailed him a question for an assignment in my English class and he replied within the day. This is truly a career author who not only writes well, but looks out for his fans.

Below I’m going to highlight the first books in each of the Sullivan’s series. Although Sullivan promises that each series is spoiler-free for the others, I suggest reading each series in order of publication, as I’ve lain out.

1.18 Theft of SwordsTHEFT OF SWORDS: BOOK ONE OF THE RIYRIA REVELATIONS
By Michael J. Sullivan
(2011)

The first book in the RIYRIA REVELATIONS is actually made up of two books in one, which he published himself originally: The Crown Conspiracy and Avempartha. When Sullivan’s books were picked up by a publisher, they decided to publish them two at a time. The story follows the unlikely pair of Hadrian, a master swordsman with a huge conscience, and Royce, an amoral thief. While on a job, the rogues end up being framed for the murder of the king and get thrown into an ancient conspiracy. I highly suggest you read this series before the other two, as it is a brilliant introduction to the world of Elan.

 

1.18 The Crown TowerTHE CROWN TOWER: BOOK ONE OF THE RIYRIA CHRONICLES
By Michael J. Sullivan
(2013)

Since Theft of Swords takes place 12 years after their first encounter, Sullivan takes this series, THE RIYRIA CHRONICLES, as a chance to show us how the unlikely duo came to be. Although the two men hate each other when they first meet, a common ally hires them to steal from The Crown Tower, an impenetrable fortress. This feat cannot be done without the skills of both, so the hope is they don’t kill each other before the job’s done. This series can be read before The Riyria Revelations, but I wouldn’t recommend it. I’m not too prideful to admit that I nearly cried at the end because of how much I had already grown to love the two.

 

1.18 Age of MythAGE OF MYTH: BOOK ONE OF THE LEGENDS OF THE FIRST EMPIRE
By Michael J. Sullivan
(2017)

This most-recent series, The Legends of The First Empire, takes place about 3,000 years before the events of Royce and Hadrian. The basic premise of this story is that everything you learned about the religions and myths in his other series isn’t necessarily accurate. Sullivan takes the phrase “history is written by the winners” with the wonder of an epic fantasy writer. In an age where men worship the Fhrey as gods, a man named Raithe finds himself a God Killer, and sets into motion the beginning of either human annihilation or the dawn of a new age.

 

 Graphic Novels1 updated

It may surprise you to hear that despite my great interest and enthusiasm for graphic novels and comics, I actually haven’t read very many yet! But like many good things – ice cream, cozy blankets, mountains, label makers – you don’t need to have tried them all to know how wonderful a medium it is. But, because I’m so in love with graphic novels, I want to read more of them. Come New Year’s, as I pondered my 2019 reading goals (the only New Year’s resolution I bother to make), I had a thought. A bold, possibly (probably) crazy thought.

What if I read every graphic novel in the library?

So I did the math. And realized just how many graphic novels we have at the library.

math meme

I realized this really was a crazy idea. Unless…

Good Idea

Parameters! Yes! Setting some guidelines wouldn’t hurt; sure, it might change the idea a bit, but realistic goals are good goals.After a few minutes, my crazy idea evolved into a legend of a goal. Drumroll, please:

READ GOAL 2019

Yes, I cut back on my original idea by focusing on just the Graphic Novel section in the adult collection of the library. It may seem like a lot, excluding books found in the Juvenile Comics, Young Adult Comics, and Overdrive collections. But with approximately 805 titles (and counting) in the Graphic Novel section alone, I’d say I have my work cut out for me. And to ensure success, I decided to share my goal with you, dear readers! It begins! Stay tuned for updates on my progress or decent into madness, whatever the case may be.

Have you made any reading goals for 2019? Do you think I’m going to lose my mind attempting mine? Comment and let us know

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