The Library is now open the following hours Monday-Friday 10:00 am - 7:00 pm and Saturday 10:00 am - 6:00 pm. Tuesday and Thursday 9:00 am - 10:00 am for at-risk/seniors. Curbside is still available.
The Library is now open the following hours Monday-Friday 10:00 am - 7:00 pm and Saturday 10:00 am - 6:00 pm. Tuesday and Thursday 9:00 am - 10:00 am for at-risk/seniors. Curbside is still available.
 

 

Book Blind Date

It’s been a while since my last segment as I was hoping to leave you with some nice alone time with your book. But love is, after all, a fickle thing and perhaps you are again on the search for a great night out (or in).

Below are four eligible and mysterious book-bachelors.  If one interests you, just scroll down and go ahead and check it out (in more ways than one perhaps).

Please check out Blind Date with a Book round one and two for more enjoyable reads.

BLIND DATE #1

  • Science Fiction
  • YA novel
  • Teenagers in space.
  • Dystopian premise, often compared to The Hunger Games.
  • Complex female protagonist.
  • Romance, betrayal, intrigue.
 

BLIND DATE #2

  • Internationally acclaimed realistic fiction.
  • Historical fiction spanning from World War I to the present.
  • Contemporary take on PTSD.
  • Moving and memorable characters 
 

BLIND DATE #3

  • Historical fantasy
  • Brings two distinctly different cultures together
  • Magical, a bit scary, unforgettable
  • A woman attempting to find her destiny in a man’s world.
 

BLIND DATE #4

  • A book about books.
  • Focused on an important British figure.
  • Utterly charming and humorous.
  • Written by a Tony award winning playwright.
 
 
 

01.10 Glow#1: GLOW
By Amy Kathleen Ryan
(2011)

 

01.10 Birdsong#2: BIRDSONG
By Sebastion Faulks
(1993) 

 

01.10 The Enchantress of Florence#3: THE ENCHANTRESS OF FLORENCE
By Salman Rushdie
(2008) 

 

01.10 The Uncommon Reader#4: THE UNCOMMON READER
By Alan Bennett
(2007) 

 

Grpahic Novels

Just like there are great graphic novel adaptations of classic literature, the library also has a host of modern classics that combine word and image. These adaptations can make a moving story even more powerful with the addition of illustrations. Here are just a few examples from our adult and teen collections.  

01.08 Wheel of TimeEYE OF THE WORLD
By Robert Jordan and Chuck Dixon
Artwork by Chase Conley
(2011) 

In this first volume of the WHEEL OF TIME SERIES, Ran al’Thor and his friends flee their home village, and are barely ahead of the pursuing Trollocs and Draghkar. Will the young people learn what they need to know in order to survive this dangerous world? 

 

01.08 Enders Game Battle SchoolENDER’S GAME : BATTLE SCHOOL
By Orson Scott Card and Christopher Yost
Artwork by Pasqual Ferry and Frank D'Armata
(2009) 

The Earth is in a desperate fight against a deadly alien race, and one child, Ender Wiggin, may be the key to saving mankind. 

 

01.08 SpeakSPEAK
By Laurie Halse Anderson
Artwork by Emily Carroll
(2018) 

Melinda starts her freshman year at Merryweather High School friendless and an outcast, all because she busted an end-of-summer party by calling the cops. Now, no one will listen to her, but what secrets could Melinda be keeping inside?  

 

01.08 Pride and Prejudice and ZombiesPRIDE AND PREJUDICE AND ZOMBIES
By Seth Grahame-Smith, Jane Austen, and Tony Lee
Artwork by Cliff Richards
(2010) 

A plague has fallen upon the quiet English village of Meryton that causes the dead to return to life. Heroine Elizabeth Bennett is determined to wipe out the zombies, but will a haughty and arrogant Mr. Darcy distract her from her mission?  

 

01.08 The AlchemistTHE ALCHEMIST
By Paulo Coelho and Derek Ruiz
Artwork by Daniel Sampere
(2010) 

Shepherd boy Santiago travels from his homeland of Spain to Egypt in search of a treasure in the Pyramids. Along the way he meets several interesting individuals who help Santiago in his quest. Soon his quest becomes more than a search to find worldly goods and turns into a discovery of self-discovery and worth.  

 

01.08 KindredKINDRED
By Octavia Butler and Damian Duffy
Artwork by Nnedi Okorafor
(2017) 

A young black writer from 1970s California finds herself transported through space and time to antebellum Maryland. She soon discovers that her very existence depends on protecting Rufus, a conflicted white child, slaveholder, and progenitor. This is a powerful look at the disturbing effects of slavery on all who it chained together. 

 

What are some of your favorite books that have graphic novel adaptations? Share them in the comments and be sure to look for our favorite nonfiction and classic fiction posts.

clements

I was really saddened to hear of the passing of Andrew Clements on November 29, 2019. In his career as an author, Andrew Clements wrote more than 80 books for young people including picture books, young adult novels, and, of course, his school stories. 

When I was in elementary school, I started reading school stories. I loved reading books about real kids in real situations having believable adventures. As a child, I was a reader who disliked book series, didn’t enjoy fantasy novels, and longed for a little more reality in my books. I still read a lot of realistic fiction, but for me there will always be one author who wrote these stories better than anyone else, and that is Andrew Clements.

frindle The first time I read FRINDLE I was instantly hooked. Here was a book about real kids who were funny, smart, and clever and made the smallest silliest change in the world just by changing the word pen to frindle. As a kid, I was too much of a teacher’s pet to even think about pulling pranks like Nicholas Allen – but I knew if he was in my class I would have started calling all of my pens frindles.

Though I’m sad to hear of the passing of one of my favorite authors, I’m so glad for a chance to look back on his career with gratitude for the role he played in building my love of learning. One of my favorite quotes from Andrew Clements is about why he likes to write stories even though he admits it’s difficult for him to do:

“Three days ago on a windy, drizzly day in New England, I stacked firewood for five hours straight, three cords of wood — had to be a couple tons of the stuff. It was difficult, but all winter now, there will be a cheery fire in the fireplace, and toasty warmth from the stove in my writing shed in the back yard. I like cheery fires and toasty stoves enough to want to do the hard work of stacking wood.

"I know from my own experience that reading a good book can be a life-changing event. So I'm willing, actually happy, to do the work of stacking all those words so they'll give off some heat and light in another's life on a winter afternoon or a summer night. And if I have the ability to perhaps make that happen, then the work becomes fun.”

Winter Hobbies

Are you looking for a productive way to spend your time indoors while winter rages outside? Are you all worn out from finishing yet ANOTHER Netflix marathon? Consider learning a new hobby! Not sure where to start? Take a look at some of these books found at The Provo City Library

01.03 20 Minute Whittling Projects20-MINUTE WHITTLING PROJECTS: FUN THINGS TO CARVE FROM WOOD
By Tom Hindes
(2016)

Why not whittle away those long, dark winter days by whittling away at a small piece of wood? This is a hobby you can take anywhere with you.Bonus: If you feel confident enough you can use your creations as gifts for the holiday season! 

 

01.03 Get CodingGET CODING!: LEARN HTML, CSS, AND JAVASCRIPT AND BUILD A WEBSITE, APP, AND GAME
By Duncan Beedie
(2017)

If you find yourself getting bored with the same old computer games over and over again, you might want to consider creating your own. Make your dreams become (virtual) reality by learning how to code! 

 

01.03 Beeswax AlchemyBEESWAX ALCHEMY: HOW TO MAKE YOUR OWN CANDLES, SOAP, BALMS, SALVS AND HOME DECOR FROM THE HIVE
By Petra Ahnert
(2015)

Spending a lot of time indoors during the winter might also mean spending a lot more money on your electricity bill. Help yourself out by learning how to make candles. You’ll save yourself some green and at the same time create a warm, cozy atmosphere to be enjoyed. 

 

01.03 Why KnotWHY KNOT?: HOW TO TIE MORE THAN SIXTY INGENIOUS, USEFUL, BEAUTIFUL, LIFESAVING, MAGICAL, INTRIGUING, AND SECURE KNOTS!
By Philippe Petit
(2013)

If you really want to make the most of your time indoors “why knot” learn how to tie different types of knots?Okay, okay. Moving on past my failed humor, this is a hobby that can save your sanity and your life. Talk about productivity! 

 

01.03 37 Houseplants Even You Cant Kill37 HOUSEPLANTS EVEN YOU CAN'T KILL
By Mary Kate Hogan
(2006)

If you find that your surrounding landscape is bleak, and bare, and dead, why not bring some colors and life into your living space by caring for a houseplant? Mary Kate Hogan guarantees that even YOU can’t kill the plants she mentions in this book, and besides, plants are pets that you don’t have to take outside in the snow at 5 am to “do their business” (looking at YOU, household dog of 17 years!).

 

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