The Library is now open Monday - Friday 9:00 am - 7:00 pm and Saturday 9:00 am - 6:00 pm. Curbside is still available.
The Library is now open the following hours Monday-Friday 9:00 am - 7:00 pm and Saturday 9:00 am - 6:00 pm. Curbside is still available.
 

 

Teen Horror Skull 

If you love the suspense and spine-tingling, slow-burn of horror books, you need to know about the treasure trove of horror in Young Adult (YA). These books are just as convoluted, smart, and terrifying, but they just happen to be on the YA shelves. If you are looking for something horrifyingly new to read, why not check out these YA Horror books.

10.23 Blood CountessBLOOD COUNTESS
By Lana Popović
(2020)

The is a classic example Gothic Horror novel with some modern sensibilities. You follow sixteen-year old Anna into the alluring world of the Countess Elizabeth. Anna starts out as a lowly scullery maid, but then she is noticed and elevated to the rank of chambermaid. But as Anna is drawn closer and closer to the stunning and clever Countess, she finds that the Countess can be as cruel as she has been kind. The atmosphere of the book is very romantic; the reader is drawn slowly into a web of darkly forbidden love. It also has some serious REBECCA by Daphne Du Maurier vibes.   

 

10.23 Wilder GirlsWILDER GIRLS
By Rory Power
(2019)

One of the great things about the Horror genre is that is mixes well will other genres. For example, this novel is a mixture of horror and quarantine survival story. Something is not right at the Raxter School for Girls. A mysterious illness threatens them from the outside. Since the Tox hit the mainland, the tiny island that the school is on is quarantined. Now the teachers are dying one by one and something is wrong with some of the students. When her best friend Byatt goes missing, Hetty is determined to find her, even if it means breaking quarantine.The writing style of this author is gritty and lush. The characterizations are compelling and drive the plot. It also has some bite-your-hand scary twists in it.

 

10.23 Dreaming DarklyDREAMING DARKLY
By Caitlin Kittridge
(2019)

This is another Gothic Horror novel with an unreliable narrator and a mysterious uncle who lives on a small island in New England. Ivy has never known a home. She has never been able to trust her mother. She doesn’t even know who her father was. When Ivy’s mother dies, Ivy is sent to live with a rich uncle she has never known or met. Ivy soon discovers many family secrets including a string of mysterious murders. But then one night she awakens from a nightmare covered in someone else’s blood. This intricately plotted story has a super creepy and menacing atmosphere.

 

10.23 Here There Are MonstersHERE THERE ARE MONSTERS
By Amelinda Bérubé
(2019)

Sometimes Horror spills over into fantasy, the kind that includes monsters, dark forests, and mind games. This book is super atmospheric, meaning that the language is very descriptive with lavish depictions of the world the author is building. This is particularly important in this novel because Skye and her sister Diedre have moved across the country and now live next to a deep, dark woods. Skye is able to acclimate to the new town and school, but Diedre withdraws from everyone and starts spending a lot of time exploring the woods and building stone and stick faces on the ground. When Diedre disappears, Skye must confront her deepest secrets and make a deal with a horrifying creature who promises the help her find her sister.This has a very PAN'S LABYRINTH feeling to it. Think dark creatures, a desperate attempt to save a sister, and having to face the monsters that reside inside of us all. 

 

Autumn Forest

Salem is an extremely popular destination during the month of October. There are more than 500 different events during the month to celebrate Halloween. The city aims to educate visitors about its mysterious past, especially the famous Salem Witch Trials. I traveled to Salem in May of 2016 but I would love to go back and visit during the month of October. Here are some interesting books about Salem that you can start reading in anticipation of your next trip.

10.19 A Season with the WitchA SEASON WITH THE WITCH: THE MAGIC AND MAYHEM OF HALLOWEEN IN SALEM, MASSACHUSETTS
By J.W. Ocker
(2016)

Welcome to Witch city! Learn about the historical sites and attractions in Salem as well as experience the thrills of Halloween as seen through the eyes of a curious and adventurous outsider. Author J.W. Ocker spends a month with his family in the city of Salem in order to experience firsthand the season with the witch. 

 

10.19 The WitchesTHE WITCHES: SALEM, 1692
By Stacy Schiff
(2015)

Along with suffrage and prohibition, the Salem Witch Trials represent one of the few moments when women played a central role in American history. An introduction to the strains on a puritan adolescent’s life, the demands of a rigorous faith, and the vulnerability of settlements adrift from the mother country. A look into the world of 17th century America. 

 

10.19 WitchesWITCHES! : THE ABSOLUTELY TRUE TALE OF DISASTER IN SALEM  
By Rosalyn Schanzer
(2011)

The riveting story of the victims, accused witches, crooked officials, and mass hysteria that turned a mysterious illness affecting two children, into a witch hunt that took over a dozen people’s lives and ruined hundreds more.

 

10.19 What Were the Salem Witch TrialsWHAT WERE THE SALEM WITCH TRIALS? 
By Joan Holub
(2015)

Something wicked was brewing in the small town of Salem in 1692.  Over the next year and a half, nineteen people were convicted of witchcraft and hanged while more languished in prison as hysteria swept the colony. An inside look at this sinister chapter in history. 

 

10.19 The Salem Witch TrialsTHE SALEM WITCH TRIALS
By Robin Johnson
(2015)

Discusses the 1692 Salem, Massachusetts, witch trials. Emphasizing how innocent people were jailed on the evidence of dreams and visions and how the legal system allowed nineteen people to be hanged before the governor of the state brought the people of Salem to their senses.

 

Fireside Storytelling

“Narrative is the binding thread of human experience, and stories are a medium that we use to know one another and ourselves.” –Leanne Prain, Strange Material: Storytelling Through Textiles

Storytelling is everywhere! We constantly speak in stories—from telling a potential employer about why we’re perfect for the job to a photo snapshot of a loved-one’s milestone. We talk about ourselves, about others, and about our experiences.

And we have stories we tell ourselves, quietly, about the way we look at the world and how the world looks at us.

Yet while this skill is often considered essential for those writing a book, or for actors on a stage, do we consider how to develop our own skill in telling our own stories? Everyone is captivated by a good story and a good story can come from anywhere. Everyone has at least one story to tell.

Storytelling comes in a variety of forms, so let’s take a look at some different ways to express the stories we live. Do you have ideas about what stories you can tell? Are you a visual or a verbal storyteller? No matter how you express them, the stories you have can only be told by you!

10.16 Long Story ShortLONG STORY SHORT: THE ONLY STORYTELLING GUIDE YOU’LL EVER NEED
By Margot Leitman
(2015)

Long Story Short was my initial plunge into the art of storytelling, a book picked out due to boredom several years ago that turned out to have far more impact than I could imagine. Margot Leitman is a long-time storytelling teacher and award-winning storyteller champion (yes, that’s a thing) who paces the reader through examples and exercises with humor and spunk. Consider this a fantastic catch-all primer for the practical application of storytelling to your everyday life. 

 

10.16 Urban Watercolor SketchingURBAN WATERCOLOR SKETCHING: A GUIDE TO DRAWING, PAINTING, AND STORYTELLING IN COLOR
By Felix Scheinberger
(2014)

Perhaps watercolor is not the first thing to come to mind when thinking about storytelling, but Felix Scheinberger does a fantastic job with teaching technique with a purpose. Storytelling with watercolor, he argues, requires balance. “The secret to using watercolor to create pictures lies in striking a balance between control and letting go. Pictures are often only ‘really good’ when they surprise us.” 

 

10.16 Daemon VoicesDAEMON VOICES: ON STORIES AND STORYTELLING
By Phillip Pullman
Edited by Simon Mason
(2018)

Daemon Voices is a collection of 32 essays written by Philip Pullman over a variety of subjects, spanning a 17-year time period, and representing several perspectives and contexts considered by the acclaimed author. With a unique “topic finder” guide at the front of the book, the reader can turn directly to whatever interests them or read the whole collection front to back. And the one theme tying everything together? Storytelling. Daemon Voices is a fantastic glimpse at how any experience can become a story worth telling. 

 

10.16 Strange MaterialSTRANGE MATERIAL: STORYTELLING THROUGH TEXTILES
By Leanne Prain
(2014)

Author and artist Leanne Prain provides a compelling and thought-provoking argument for ways to weave (heh) life experiences into the physical and often underappreciated medium of textiles. Personal anecdotes and interviews with textile artists are punctuated with project ideas you can do at home. Strange Material looks at everything from story quilts to comedic embroidery and how to turn your own crafts into tangible stories.

 

Libby

With the library closed and more of us using electronic resources for reading, here’s some tips for limiting searches on Libby. These filters are especially helpful if you are browsing a subject or one of the many lists that Utah’s Online Library has available. The photos are from an Android device, but these options should be the same on an iOS device as well. 

Today I want to show you three of Libby’s search filter options.  Preferences, Refine, and more.

Libby Screenshot 1

 

Anything changed under Preferences will save and apply to all future searches as well, until changed again.  This is great if you only want Audiobooks, for example.

Libby Screenshot 2a

 

Something to keep in mind with Preferences however is that changes made here will apply to all future searches. So, if you change Availability to Available Now and get reading a series, if any of the books in that series has a waitlist then you won’t find that book in any of your searches until you change Availability back to Everything. I may or may not be speaking with the voice of experience there.

Filters added under Refine will only apply to the current search. This is great for narrowing down your search results, especially when those results include thousands of books, all without changing what shows in future searches.

Libby Screenshot 3

 

The Search Within Results is an especially great feature because you can do a search within a search! If you have already put a few filters on your search but still not finding what you want, you can add another search term here without losing your previous filters. 

Above Preferences and Refine, each search will have a list of genres that appear in the search result. It will list a handful, ending with “and more.” Selecting “and more” shows all of the genres that appear in the search results. This is great if you want a book that falls under two or more genres, such as Mystery and Historical Fiction.

Libby Screenshot 4

 

It also tells you how many books fall under both categories, listed from most to least. In this example of looking at Mystery as the main genre, you can see there are 1,458 books that are also tagged Historical Fiction. Further down the list than what is shown here, you’d see Western with 38 books that fall under both Mystery and Western. 

Browsing Libby is different than browsing a physical collection of books, but by using the above search filters makes browsing for a good read easier and quicker than trying to browse through all of Libby. Play around with it and see what you can find!

 

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