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Post-Christmas blues? After the 25th, it can be hard to let go of the holidays. Here are a few not quite Christmas movies that still keep that December spirit alive.  

1.7 The Lion the Witch and the WardrobeTHE CHRONICLES OF NARNIA: THE LION, THE WITCH, AND THE WARDROBE
Directed by Andrew Adamson
(2005)

A great take on the C.S. Lewis book, the wintery setting (and the fact that Santa Claus actually shows up in this film) make it a great pick for Christmas. Though for most of the movie it’s “always winter, but never Christmas” there are plenty of festive characters to enjoy. So sit down with some turkish delight and enjoy this reimagining of an old classic. 

 

1.7 While You Were SleepingWHILE YOU WERE SLEEPING
Directed by Jon Turteltaub
(1995)

A romantic comedy, this film takes place actually takes place over several holidays. Sandra Bullock pretends to be the fiancee of the comatose man she saved, all while slowing falling for his brother. The fun family dynamics make this a great film to watch any time of the year. 

 

1.7 Harry PotterHARRY POTTER AND THE SORCERER'S STONE
Directed by Chris Columbus
(2001)

This movie takes place, of course, throughout an entire school year. But some of its most memorable scenes take place over the holiday break: from the delicious Christmas feasts, to Harry discovering his invisibility cloak and the Mirror of Erised. It also helps that television networks have made the movie a Christmas staple over the past few years. 

 

1.7 Little WomenLITTLE WOMEN
Directed by Gillian Armstrong
(1994)

Though this takes place over several years, its most enduring moments happen during Christmas. Enjoy this heartwarming, and sometimes heartbreaking, story of an American family as they experience life during and after the Civil War.

 

 Sparklers

If you’re anything like me, you have a million books that you’ve been meaning to read but haven’t gotten to yet. The New Year is the perfect time to recommit to reading those books that you’ve always meant to get to, and the library is here to help! We’ll have a display all month stocked with various classics, best sellers, and other books that might be outstaying their welcome on your “to read” list. Listed below is just a small sample of our offerings:

Classics

1.4 Wuthering HeightsWUTHERING HEIGHTS
By Emily Brontë
(1847) 

Cathy is fascinated with the orphan that her father has taken in. While her brother Hindley despises him, Cathy becomes Heathcliff’s constant companion, and he falls wildly in love with her. Despite their feelings for each other, Cathy will not marry Heathcliff and this proves to be their downfall. 

 

1.4 The Great GatsbyTHE GREAT GATSBY
By F Scott Fitzgerald
(1925) 

Jay Gatsby is as mysterious as his parties are wild. His Long Island mansion is filled day and night with young people drinking and dancing and discussing their host. Gatsby always seems to be alone, waiting for something—or someone. 

 

Best Sellers

1.4 All the Light We Cannot SeeALL THE LIGHT WE CANNOT SEE
By Anthony Doerr
(2014) 

Marie-Laure is a blind girl who lives in Paris with her father. Werner Pfennig is an orphan in Germany who is fascinated by the radio. As World War II strikes, both children will have to figure out how best to survive. 

 

1.4 Go Set a WatchmanGO SET A WATCHMAN
By Harper Lee
(2015) 

Twenty years after the events in TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD, Jean Louise “Scout” Finch returns to her hometown to visit her father. While her town struggles to adjust to the civil rights movement, Scout struggles with her own personal issues as she learns things about her family that she never knew. 

 

Books-to-Movies

1.4 Ready Player 1READY PLAYER ONE
By Ernest Cline
(2011) 

The year is 2044 and the entire world pretty much lives in the OASIS, which is a massive online game. When the creator of the OASIS dies, he releases an OASIS-wide scavenger hunt. Whoever can find his easter eggs will inherit the OASIS and all the money that comes with it. When teenager Wade Watts solves the first riddle, he’s thrown into the spotlight—and not necessarily in a good way. 

 

1.4 Crazy Rich AsiansCRAZY RICH ASIANS
By Kevin Kwan
(2013) 

Meeting your boyfriend’s family is hard enough, but when he didn’t tell you that his family is worth millions if not billions of dollars, it can quickly turn into a disaster. Rachel Chu is about to find out how hard it really is to fit in with people who regularly spend millions of dollars on jewelry. And that’s nothing compared to winning over her boyfriend’s mother.

 

Julia Child

I have a confession. Sometimes I get really fangirly about something or someone and I read everything that I can find on that thing or person. I watch every movie; I read every book or magazine. I watch every YouTube video. Being a fan is a way of life for me. And this year I got all fangirly about Julia Child. She has become a hero of mine. She is now someone I look up to, someone I understand, someone with whom I relate. If you are curious about Julia Child, here are some of the best offerings Provo Library has on this big, loud, lovely woman. 

12.28 My Life in FranceMY LIFE IN FRANCE
By Julia Child
(2006) 

This memoir was begun just months before Julia’s death and describes her and Paul’s years in Paris, Marseille, and Provence. But it is also about her journey from a young woman from Pasadena who cannot cook or speak any French to the publication of her legendary Mastering cookbooks and her winning the hearts of America as "The French Chef."  

This is an upbeat, funny, and richly detailed memoir about Julia’s blossoming at age 40. Working for the government and meeting Paul Child changed her life forever. Their love story and their love affair with France is heartwarming and swoonworthy, as is all the food.  

 

12.28 The French Chef in AmericaTHE FRENCH CHEF IN AMERICA: JULIA CHILD’S SECOND ACT
By Alex Prud’homme
(2016) 

This is basically part two of My Life in France. Nephew Alex Prud'homme recounts Julia Child's life during the late sixties to the early eighties when, after the success of her book MASTERING THE ART OF FRENCH COOKING brought her fame, she struggled to re-find herself and create her legacy in America. This book focuses specifically on Julia’s work in America. It discusses her groundbreaking television program, the many cookbooks she wrote, and her documentaries.  

By this point in Julia's life, Paul had become confused and surly. He never really recovered from a surgery he had. Though Paul was prickly with other people, he was Julia’s partner in everything. It’s amazing to see how Julia juggled her career and her marriage. The biography reads like a narrative and was so hard to put down. 

 

12.28 DearieDEARIE: THE REMARKABLE LIFE OF JULIA CHILD
By Bob Spitz
(2012) 

This is a delightful biography of a delightful woman. It gives comprehensive coverage of Julia’s entire life, not just her time in France. It particularly focuses the complex and passionate relationship between Julia and Paul. This relationship was the catalyst for Julia’s blossoming into a confident, competent, and creative chef and TV personality. It also discusses how Julia found her own voice and beliefs after being sequestered in the heart of California amongst her family and friends. The book was such a great read. The new information and excerpts from letters really made Julia and Paul real.  

 

12.28 As Always JuliaAS ALWAYS JULIA: THE LETTERS OF JULIA CHILD AND AVIS DEVOTO
Edited by Joan Reardon
(2010)

Julia Child is famous for her cooking, her size, and her voice. But one lesser known thing about Julia Child is that she was a prolific letter writer. One of her favorite correspondents was her dear friend Avis DeVoto. Some may have heard about Avis from her brief mention in the movie JULIE AND JULIA, but as is often the case, the movie doesn't do her justice at all. Avis DeVoto was a writer and a chef in her own right. She was an inspirational and a driving force behind both volumes of Julia's MASTERING THE ART OF FRENCH COOKING. The letters between these two friends over the space of a lifetime are revealing of their humor, their intelligence, and their spunk. 

 

I loved reading about Julia this year. She has always been like a giant good fairy in my life. She blossomed at age 40, finding the love of her life and her true calling. She learned what she really believed, even though it wasn't what her family raised her to believe. She loved her country passionately, but also loved the world outside of it. These books are full of life, and love, and FOOD.

 

 anne fashion

One of literature’s most beloved heroines, Anne Shirley, can be an inspiration to all of us. Although she’s far from perfect, she can teach us a lot about wanting adventure, having a huge imagination, and loving with your whole heart.

But wanting to emulate a character sometimes means we want to do more than act like her—we also want to dress like her. Or at the very least, dress in an aesthetic inspired by her stories. Since L.M. Montgomery’s classic tale is set in the late 1800s in Canada, it might be a bit difficult to cull inspiration directly from the books. Instead of wearing the classic 1880s fashion statement—the bustle—you can take inspiration from the style of ANNE OF GREEN GABLES that fits better with modern styles.

Anne is both strong and romantic. While she loves to be in charge, and see the world, she is prone to loving the girlish and fanciful. Below are three outfits that I think encompass the romantic but adventurous spirit of Anne.

Some starting points: Anne loves to go out and adventure, so she probably wouldn’t wear heels unless it was a special occasion, since we have so many other options that are better for having fun, but are just as cute. She loves to be girly, and she isn’t afraid to be a little (a lot) dramatic. She loves romance, especially flowers, so she’d probably wear florals even when it isn’t springtime. And never forget Anne’s classic wide-brimmed hat and braids—the girl loves accessories.

Outfit 1Outfit #1:

“I’m so glad I live in a world where there are Octobers”

Anne’s world always makes me excited for fall—the crunchy leaves, the cups of tea, the curling up with a good book—so I thought Anne herself might wear an outfit that lets her enjoy the crisp air and the promise of a little autumn magic. While the outfit is practical enough to wear out and about, Anne’s romantic side is preserved through the addition of a scarf and a brooch. The field notes are so that Anne can write down all of her wild imaginings.

 
 

Outfit 2Outfit #2:

“Because when you are imagining, you might as well imagine something worthwhile.”

Anne is a classic daydreamer—she sometimes lets her imagination run away with her a little bit too much. She sees the romantic everywhere, and conjures up names to match the passion in her heart for all the things around her. An outfit like this will let you curl up with a good book—or a blank notebook—and imagine all the worlds you want to. The comfy sweater and socks allow you to relax, while the locket and embroidered collar infuse it with a little of Anne’s classic romanticism.

 
 

outfit 3Outfit #3:

“It is ever so much easier to be good if your clothes are fashionable.”

The reason Anne wants her name to be spelled with an E and not just plain ANN is that she longs for the fancy and fashionable. Plain Ann isn’t romantic enough—Anne dreams of a world where she has the most beautiful clothes and wishes to surround herself with lovely things. This outfit will let you traipse off to a museum, school, or a bookstore, so you can meet minds with all the best people—while looking your very best. Although this outfit doesn’t have puffed sleeves, a pinafore dress paired with a quirky printed button-down is sort of the modern equivalent.

 

When trying to dress like Anne, the most important thing to remember is that you can make your life as romantic as you choose—so throw on your fancy hat, wear your grandma’s brooch, and carry a book with you everywhere you go.  

 

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