Aladdin

aladdin 01 

Find them in the catalog:

FAR FROM AGRABAH

GENIE IN A BOTTLE

WISHING MOON

suspend holds

If you’re a frequent library user, you might be familiar with this dilemma: there are tons of books you want to read, but other people want to read them too. So, like the industrious library user you are, you put them all on hold. 

And then, because the universe doesn’t care about things like how long it takes to read a book, ALL YOUR HOLDS COME IN AT ONCE. And maybe you have more time to read than I do, but between my family, my work, and my need for some semblance of sleep, I haven’t yet been able to get through nine books in three weeks. But it’s painful to return something, knowing that you’ll go to the back of the line and you’ll wait another six weeks (or months!) to get that book again. 

So what’s an intrepid reader to do? The answer is easy. Suspend your holds! 

When you suspend a hold, you keep your place in line but allow others to bump in front of you until you’re ready for your hold. This works slightly differently in our catalog and with Libby (digital books), so I’ll walk you through both processes. 

PHYSICAL MATERIALS 

For materials managed exclusively through our catalog – print books, audiobooks on CD, etc. – the suspend holds feature keeps your place in line until a specific date. If you reach the top of the holds queue while your hold is suspended, other people will jump in front of you until the hold reactivates. 

To suspend a hold through the library’s catalog, log in to your library account and click the “my holds” tab. Here you can see all of your digital holds. 

Suspend Holds Pic 1

 

Simply select the title you’d like to suspend, and choose a date when you’d like the hold to reactivate. This can be a little bit of a guessing game, but if you know that you’ve got a vacation or something concrete planned you can select a time when you know you’ll be available to give that book all the attention it deserves. If your reading schedule opens up unexpectedly, you can always cancel your hold suspension and you will immediately start working your way up the hold list again. 

Suspend Holds Pic 2

 

DIGITAL MATERIALS THROUGH LIBBY 

If you do some of your reading through Libby by Overdrive (and if you don’t…why not? It’s amazing!), the Libby app has its own hold suspension system. It works similarly; you keep working your way up the hold queue while your hold is suspended, and if you reach the top slot Libby will allow one person at a time ahead of you until your hold is reactivated. To suspend a hold in Libby, go to your shelf and then your holds tab. Click on the red/blue “manage hold” square on the title you’d like to suspend. 

suspend holds pic 3

 

From here you can cancel or suspend your hold. I suggest you suspend.

suspend holds pic 4

 

This is now the step that doesn’t feel intuitive to me. You will be taken to a screen that gives you some information about your hold; click on the button in the lower right corner that says “active”, and then choose how long you’d like to suspend your hold. 

suspend holds pic 5

 

You will then be given a confirmation screen. If you immediately regret your decision, you can click “update hold suspension” and go back and rethink your life choices. 

suspend holds pic 6

 

Suspending holds is still a bit of a guessing game; unless you’re really diligent about knowing your place in every hold queue, there’s still a chance that your best-laid hold suspensions will all activate at the same time and you’ll still need to figure out how you can listen to a 48-hour audiobook in three days and still sleep and interact with other humans (I’m going to go ahead and tell you that you can’t. It’s just impossible. Forego human contact or resign yourself to jumping back into that hold queue.). 

Still, it’s a tool in your belt. Place holds with abandon, and use the suspend feature wrangle them into a manageable state. Your personal reading queue will thank you. 

 

reading lately

I’ve been luxuriating in memoir lately. It’s so powerful to read about people’s experiences in their own words. It’s like sitting down with them in a cozy corner and having a really good chat.

Memoir is deeply personal writing about a specific time in a person’s life and touches on the person’s memories, feelings, and emotions.

Memoir can be inspiring, horrifying, intoxicating, and hysterical. If you are interested in trying out memoir for the first time, or are looking for your next good read, check out this list of what I’ve been reading lately.

5.21 EducatedEDUCATED
By Tara Westover
(2018)

Tara Westover grew up living off the grid in Idaho. Her erratic father and her midwife mother were strict fundamentalist, so Tara and her siblings never went to school. Tara was 17 the first time she entered a classroom. This is an astounding memoir about how Westover taught herself so she could enter BYU as a college freshman.

This was a heart wrenching read. The ignorance, squalor, and violence that she experienced in her family of origin is hard to stomach. How could a story like this happen in a modern, civilized world? Yet, the way Westover describes her experience is unflinching and ultimately inspirational. This one will really make you think.       

 

5.21 BecomingBECOMING
By Michelle Obama
(2018)

This is an intimate portrait of a powerful woman who has experienced heartbreaks and successes that have shaped an amazing life. I really appreciated the section where she recounts her experience with fertility treatments and trying to get pregnant.

These tender details make this more than just a “famous person” memoir. It is articulate and impeccably written. Reading this book was like having Michelle Obama as a delightful house guest for a couple of days.

 

5.21 In PiecesIN PIECES
by Sally Field
(2018)

Field gives an unflinching and heartbreaking view of Old Hollywood and her experiences as she evolved from teen sweetheart to Oscar-winning leading lady.

Field’s authenticity and vulnerability is compelling and her life is inspiring. Though some of the subject matter is dark, her glowing hope shines through. This is a beautifully written, tender and raw memoir about an inner child who just wants to be enough.

 

5.21 Whiskey in a TeacupWHISKEY IN A TEACUP: WHAT GROWING UP IN THE SOUTH TAUGHT ME ABOUT LIFE, LOVE, AND BAKING BISCUITS
By Reese Witherspoon
(2018

)In this chatty memoir/recipe book, Reese Witherspoon shares what it was like growing up in The South, particularly the influence of her grandmother Dorothea. At the end of each chapter, she shares family recipes and lists of books and music that can bring the charm and tradition of Tennessee to your home.

I loved this book. I wasn’t sure what I was expecting, but Reese Witherspoon writes with charm and candor about her upbringing and the power of family. It was really interesting to see into her life outside of her movies.

 

5.21 Talking as Fast as I CanTALKING AS FAST AS I CAN: FROM GILMORE GIRLS TO GILMORE GIRLS, (AND EVERYTHING IN BETWEEN)
By Lauren Graham
(2016)

This memoir was like talking to my best friends about life, love, and our favorite episodes of GILMORE GIRLS. Graham explains her childhood, her life-changing role as Dolly Levi in HELLO, DOLLY!  and all the things that lead her to GILMORE GIRLS and PARENTHOOD. She also shares from her diary that she kept during the filming of GILMORE GIRLS: A YEAR IN THE LIFE and her reunion with Alexis Bledel and Kelly Bishop and what it was like to be without Edward Herriman’s quintessential Richard Gilmore. But mostly it is about how she always felt that she had something inside of her that she wanted to share, that she needed to impart, and she did, talking as fast as she could.

 

 Graphic Novel Classics

Classic literature – the bane of high school English students. Like many people, I struggled with the works of classical writers, like Shakespeare and Aristotle, during my education. Luckily, the library owns a variety of these works in graphic novel adaptation, combining word and illustration to tell the story. Here are some of my favorite classic literature adaptations. 

5.15 Fahrenheit 451FAHRENHEIT 451
By Ray Bradbury and Tim Hamilton
(2009)

Experience Montag’s awakening to the evil of government-controlled thought and the need for philosophy and literature in striking artwork in this authorized adaptation. 

 

5.15 The OdysseyTHE ODYSSEY
By Gareth Hinds 
(2010)

Based on Homer’s epic poem, follow the journey of Odysseus as he travels home from the Trojan War. Experience violent storms, sirens, monsters, and sorceresses through word and colorful illustrations in this unique adaptation.  

 

5.15 Crime and PunishmentCRIME AND PUNISHMENT
By Fyodor Dostoevsky and David Mairowitz
(2008)

Set in present-day Russia, the black and white illustrations create a haunting picture of Raskolnikov’s inner turmoil. After committing a horrible crime, he is driven toward confession as a reprieve from his agony. A basic understanding of the original novel would enhance this adaptation.  

 

5.15 Pride and PrejudicePRIDE AND PREJUIDUCE
By Jane Austen and Stacy King
(2014) 

Discover the classic love story of Elizabeth Bennett and Mr. Darcy in this Manga Classic adaptation. Sometimes pride and first impressions can get in the way of true love. And check out our other Manga Classic titles for lots more adaptations.

 

5.15 To Kill a MockingbirdTO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD
By Harper Lee and Fred Fordham
(2018)

Read the story of one little girl as she experiences the racial hate in an Alabama town as her father defends a black man accused of rape in this new adaptation of the classic novel.

 

Do you have any favorite graphic novel adaptations of classic literature? Share them in the comments and be sure to look for our favorite nonfiction and current fiction titles in the coming weeks.

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