Marie Kondo

Chances are, you’ve heard of Marie Kondo and the KonMari method by now. If not, you’re probably still buried under a mountain of possessions like most of America. With her 2014 bestseller, THE LIFE-CHANGING MAGIC OF TIDYING UP, Marie Kondo single-handedly started a revolution of decluttering and organizing. More recently, she has come out with a Netflix series called TIDYING UP WITH MARIE KONDO that has reached a whole new audience and flooded the world with decluttering fever once again. Now that you’ve read the book (and the sequel, SPARK JOY), and watched the Netflix series, you may be wondering where else you can get inspiration for your spring cleaning. The following are some great books on organization and living with less that you may find interesting. 

11.01 Digital MinimalismDIGITAL MINIMALISM
By Cal Newport
(2019)

Perhaps you have KonMari-ed down to just the items that “spark joy” and are looking for a new frontier to battle. Cal Newport suggests diving into your digital clutter. The same way that an overabundance of physical clutter can overwhelm you at home, an overabundance of digital clutter can overwhelm you everywhere you go. If non-essential notifications and the pressure to capture the perfect picture for social media can distract you from real-life moments, perhaps this book is for you. 

 

11.01 The Gentle Art of Swedish Death CleaningTHE GENTLE ART OF SWEDISH DEATH CLEANING: HOW TO FREE YOURSELF AND YOUR FAMILY FROM A LIFETIME OF CLUTTER
By Margareta Magnusson
(2018)

While similar in the aim to declutter, Swedish Death Cleaning and the KonMari method are a bit different. Have you ever had a relative die and, during the grieving process, had to sort through their collection of stuff only to find junk and items you felt guilt-tripped into keeping? Swedish Death Cleaning aims to remove this burden from your relatives by taking care of it throughout your life. Rather than just asking if items "spark joy” for you, you also ask if they will be useful to your posterity. Margareta Magnusson does a beautiful job of outlining this process as she goes through her own things, with some humor thrown in along the way. 

 

11.01 The Minimalist HomeTHE MINIMALIST HOME: A ROOM-BY-ROOM GUIDE TO A DECLUTTERED, REFOCUSED LIFE
By Joshua Becker
(2018)

Written by Joshua Becker, popular editor of the Becoming Minimalist website (https://www.becomingminimalist.com/), The Minimalist Home guides readers through the process of decluttering their home by room rather than by type. If Marie Kondo inspired you but her style of decluttering didn’t work for you, Becker’s might. Also, note that minimalism to Becker doesn’t mean getting down to the bare bones – it means to get rid of the excess, whatever that means for your life. 

 

11.01 Organized EnoughORGANIZED ENOUGH: THE ANTI-PERFECTIONIST’S GUIDE TO GETTING – AND STAYING – ORGANIZED
By Amanda Sullivan
(2017)

If minimalism isn’t for you, and you’re looking for another gentle organizing technique that doesn’t suggest getting rid of everything you own, Amanda Sullivan may be the next author you need to read. Her tips on organization are a bit more realistic for the everyday person. Read this book if Marie Kondo’s technique was a little too much for you and you want to try another method of organization – one that doesn’t involve an intense folding process. 

 

11.01 Soulful SimplicitySOULFUL SIMPLICITY
By Courtney Carver
(2017)

After being diagnosed with MS, Courtney Carver took on the excess in her life so that she could focus on what mattered most: her daughter. She describes her diagnosis as a “wake-up call,” but hopefully the rest of us don’t need an incurable disease to get us on the path we want in life. Jonathan Fields said it best, “Marie Kondo taught us how to declutter our homes; now it’s time to let Courtney Carver take us to a deeper place.” If tidying up with Marie Kondo brought you joy, but you still feel that there is something missing (or rather, excessive) in your life, this might be the next book for you.

 

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