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  • historical anniversaries 1

    Irish philosopher Edmund Burke famously said, “Those who don’t know history are doomed to repeat it.” Here at the Provo Library, we like to keep the doom at bay by keeping our readers informed. With the New Year comes new historical anniversaries, so here are some books to help you keep the past in mind as you progress through 2018.  

     

    The End of World War I

    Let’s start out with a happy anniversary for the end of the four year conflict in which ended in a win for the Allies. The end of the war became official on November 11, 1918 when the armistice was signed between the Allies of World War I and Germany. Did you know that this is why we celebrate Veterans Day on November 11? At the library, we have a ton of books on World War I, but here’s a great title to read in order to celebrate:  

    2.6 11th Month 11th Day 11th HourELEVENTH MONTH, ELEVENTH DAY, ELEVENTH HOUR: ARMISTICE DAY, 1918, WORLD WAR I AND IT’S VIOLENT CLIMAX
    Joseph E. Persico
    (2004) 

     

    The Spanish Influenza

    This year marks 100 years since the outbreak of one of the deadliest pandemics in human history. In just a few years, over 50 million people died of this disease, with some estimates of up to 100 million deaths. Though most people are aware of this terrible part of our history, few are aware of just how devastating the disease was to communities, politics, and the economy. To learn more about this deadly pandemic, check out: 

    2.6 The Great InfluenzaTHE GREAT INFLUENZA: THE EPIC STORY OF THE DEADLIEST PLAGUE IN HISTORY
    John M. Barry
    (2004)

     

    The Assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

    This April will mark 50 years since the shocking day that the world lost beloved leader Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Few men have made more of an impact on our nation than Martin Luther King, Jr. Renowned for his non-violent approach to civil rights activism, his moral character, and his moving oratory, King continues to be loved my many around the world. The library has many noteworthy books on Martin Luther King, Jr. This title is a good jumping off point to learn more about King and his ideas: 

    2.5 The Martin Luther King Jr. CompanionTHE MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR. COMPANION: QUOTATIONS FROM THE SPEECHES, ESSAYS, AND BOOKS OF MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR.
    By Martin Luther King, Jr.
    (1993) 

  • spring cleaning

    We librarians here at Provo City Library have been abuzz about Marie Kondo's 2014 book, THE LIFE CHANGING MAGIC OF TIDYING UP, the #1 New York Times best seller that has been inspiring people to declutter their homes so much that thrift stores across the nation have been flooded with donations.

    If you’re like us and you’ve been inspired by the Konmarie method, or you’re simply raring to tidy up, improve your home, and prepare for a busy summer ahead, check out our librarians' favorite home care books!

    Breanne recommends:

    100 things100 THINGS EVERY HOMEOWNER MUST KNOW
    by Gary Wentz 
    (2015)

    This is an invaluable book for anyone who owns their own home and wants to care for it properly.  It covers all areas of your home, including things from how to keep your faucets drip-free, to growing the best lawn on the block, to preparing your home before you go on vacation.  It also includes easy repairs for appliances, plumbing, flooring, walls, furniture, driveways, and more.

     

     

    Shaina recommends:

    home comfortsHOME COMFORTS: THE ART AND SCIENCE OF KEEPING HOUSE
    by Cheryl Mendelson
    (1999)

    This book is a great reference, and, because I'm kind of strange, I'll also sit down and read it for fun sometimes.  The writing is surprisingly engaging, and HOME COMFORTS includes thorough instructions for caring for just about every aspect of the home (including deciphering those little hieroglyphics on clothing tags).  Relying on thorough research, Mendelson describes not only how to keep house, but the scientific and historical reasons for why we do.  Since the author is a lawyer, she even includes a section on laws that might affect homeowners.  You'd be hard pressed to come up with a question about housekeeping that this book doesn't answer. 

     

    Rikki recommends:

    lawngoneLAWN GONE! LOW-MAINTENANCE, SUSTAINABLE, ATTRACTIVE ALTERNATIVES FOR YOUR YARD
    by Pam Penick
    (2013)

    If you hate mowing the lawn as much as I do, LAWN GONE! is the book to alleviate your woes. While short, it is considerably broad in range, spanning the pros and cons as well as tips and tricks for a yard with little to no lawn. Whether you have a small or large yard, are looking to replace grass with gravel or mulch, flower beds, garden space, shrubs, or sitting areas, the ideas in this book are sure to inspire. I particularly found the numerous color photos, before and after examples, and lists of regional plant recommendations to be particularly useful for a novice landscaper like myself. 

    Breanne recommends:

    dinnerreadyDINNER IS READY! A COMPLETE GUIDE TO FREEZING 30 MEALS IN JUST ONE DAY!
    by Deanna Buxton
    (2007)

    This amazing book is a quick read, as about a third of the book talks about how to actually get everything done in one day, and the rest is filled with 150 recipes. I especially liked the recipes because they are quick and easy to do - you won't find too many with more than 5 or 6 ingredients and steps. I pared it down to 10 meals for my first trial-run. I spent about $50 on the groceries, two hours in the kitchen, and packed 9 meals away in the freezer (we ate the 10th that night). I actually found the process kind of fun, and the tips and guidelines she gives in the instructional part of the book really did help a lot as I put this all together. Plus, what I've eaten so far was yummy!

     

     

    Shaina recommends:

    organichouseORGANIC HOUSEKEEPING: IN WHICH THE NONTOXIC AVENGER SHOWS YOU HOW TO IMPROVE YOUR HEALTH AND THAT OF YOUR FAMILY, WHILE YOU SAVE TIME, MONEY, AND, PERHAPS, YOUR SANITY
    by Ellen Sandbeck
    (2006)

    I look at this as the nontoxic equivalent of Mendelson's HOME COMFORTS book.  Sandbeck points out that we use harsh chemicals so often in our homes that they are actually more polluted than the outdoors.  In our obsessive effort to rid our homes of germs, we have actually compromised our immune systems and created "super bugs" that are resistant to disinfectants or antimicrobial medications.  Sandbeck discusses how to prevent messes as well as clean them, and she offers a few green, nontoxic formulas to replace traditional cleaners.

  • cats and kissing 01

    Ever wonder how librarians hone their recommendation skills? Sometimes, our librarians play a game we call the 6 Degrees of reading. The rules are simple: choose six books, each connected somehow to the book above it, with the last book in the list connecting to the first. Periodically, we like the results enough to share them with you. Today's iteration takes a romp through young adult fiction, adult nonfiction, and romance to bring you some of our favorite things: cats and kissing. 

    THE THING ABOUT JELLYFISH
    by Ali Benjamin

    (2015)

    Suzy Swanson is a teenage girl trying to make sense of a new school and new peers, but that's been hard to do ever since the death of her best friend, Franny. Suzy is also a budding scientist, and when she learns about the Irukandji Jellyfish she develops a new hypothesis about what really happened to her friend.

    CAT SENSE: HOW THE NEW FELINE SCIENCE CAN MAKE YOU A BETTER FRIEND TO YOUR PET
    by John Bradshaw 
    (2013)

    Scientist John Bradshaw explains how cats evolved from lone predators to domestic companions with the hope that people will understand their cats better and provide a more harmonious environment for them. 

    DEWEY: THE SMALL-TOWN LIBRARY CAT WHO TOUCHED THE WORLD
    by Vicki Myron
    (2008)

    Dewey Readmore Books, a cat, was found one morning in the Spencer, Iowa library. Dewey was adopted by librarian, Vicki Myron who was his caring owner for the next 19 years. Dewey changed Vicki's life and touched the lives of many more. 

    TROUBLE WHEN YOU WALKED IN
    by Kieran Kramer
    (2015) 

    Cissie Rogers is a librarian in a small town in North Carolina. When Mayor, Boone Braddock puts the library's future in peril, Cissie decides to take matters into her own hands by running for mayor herself. What Cissie doesn't count on is a developing relationship with her opponent. 

    THE PORTABLE VEBLEN
    by Elizabeth McKenzie
    (2016)

    A young couple in a developing relationship discover how complex love can be as they encounter everything from dysfunctional families, to the attentions of a seductive heiress, to an encounter with a very charismatic squirrel.   

    KISSING IN AMERICA
    by Margo Rabb
    (2015)

    Two teenage girls, Eva and Annie, discover how complex love can be as they journey across the country to find Will— the boy Ava thinks is her soul mate.

     

     

  • 6 degrees header 01 

     

    Ever wonder how librarians hone their recommendation skills? Sometimes, our librarians play a game we call the 6 Degrees of reading. The rules are simple: choose six books, each connected somehow to the book above it, with the last book in the list connecting to the first. Periodically, we like the results enough to share them with you.

    This week: Chaos and Comedy! 

     chaos and comedy 01

    THE DISASTER DIARIES
    by Sam Sheridan
    (2013)

    There are a variety of ways that the world could be thrown into chaos and Sheridan has researched and acquired a variety of skills to help him survive almost any potential apocalypse. His lively and hilarious style while still presenting disastrous scenarios is a wonderful mix.

    LIFE AS WE KNEW IT
    by Susan Beth Pfeffer
    (2006)

    A young woman takes charge of her life and her family’s lives as survival becomes increasingly difficult after the world is thrown into chaos when the moon is knocked out of its orbit.

    LEAN IN: WOMEN, WORK, AND THE WILL TO LEAD
    by Sheryl Sandberg
    (2013)

    Sandberg is a woman who has taken charge of her life and encourages others to do so by following their ambitions. She tells it like it is and strives to be an inspiration to women everywhere.

    BOSSYPANTS
    by Tina Fey
    (2011)

    Best known for her work on 30 Rock and SNL, Fey relates her life story in her own comedic way. She tries to emphasize that she’s just like the rest of us, while being a role model and an inspiration to all women.

    IS EVERYONE HANGING OUT WITHOUT ME
    by Mindy Kaling
    (2011)

    Mindy is an Emmy-nominated, comedy writer and actress, and uses this book to relate her life story in her own comedic way.

    SERIOUSLY, I'M KIDDING
    by Ellen DeGeneres
    (2011)

    Ellen has become one of the most popular daytime TV hosts, having won 31 Emmys. Her lively, hilarious, and upbeat style is engaging and enjoyable.

  • Ever wonder how librarians hone their recommendation skills? Sometimes, our librarians play a game we call the 6 Degrees of reading. The rules are simple: choose six books, each connected somehow to the book above it, with the last book in the list connecting to the first. Periodically, we like the results enough to share them with you. So, with no further ado, we bring you 6 Degrees of Reading: Games and Globalization. 

    games and globalization 01

    THAT’S NOT ENGLISH: BRITISHISMS, AMERICANISMS, AND WHAT OUR ENGLISH SAYS ABOUT US
    by Erin Moore  
    (2015)

    American by birth, author Erin Moore, now living in London with her Anglo-American husband, uses wit and humor to explore the historical and cultural differences of English language usage between Americans and British. Through several themed chapters on topics ranging from snacking habits to raising children, Moore explores the etymology of words on both sides of the pond and what these differences say about us.

    GLOBISH: HOW THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE BECAME THE WORLD’S LANGUAGE
    by Robert McCrum
    (2010)

    Robert McCrum discusses how English language usage has spread from Great Britain to everywhere on earth as he takes readers on a whirlwind tour of British and American history and their mark on the world up through modern times where people in Asia are racing to learn the English. In the 1980s, there was a fear that the English language would degenerate into a vast number of dialects. However, with the modern globalization of the world, English has not only avoided this fate, but grown to become the language of choice around the globe.

    HOW SOCCER EXPLAINS THE WORLD: THE UNLIKELY THEORY OF GLOBALIZATION
    by Franklin Foer  
    (2004)

    Using soccer to show differences and commonalities, Foer reveals how the globalization of the world is simultaneously making everywhere more alike and more different as people seek to define themselves through their love of soccer. By examining the game, he focuses on understanding how international forces affect politics and life around the globe. Showing how in some places sport and competition can be used as a method to keep hatred, racism, or religious tolerance alive and in other places it is used as a modernizing force (such as in Iran where women forced police to allow them into a men’s-only stadium to celebrate a win for their national team).

    THE MONOPOLISTS: OBSESSION, FURY, AND THE SCANDAL BEHIND THE WORLD'S FAVORITE BOARD GAME
    by Mary Pilon
    (2015)

    Sport and competition have always resulted in high stakes. Look no further than Mary Pilon’s revealing book into the turbulent history of the Monopoly board game. Pilon reveals the Monopoly's interesting origins including the lost female originator of the game,  the Parker Brothers' attempts to blockade the development of other similar games, and the competitive rivalry between Parker Brothers and Milton Bradley. This is an interesting read about the origins of a beloved board game, the folk history surrounding it, and the corporate greed that made it into the iconic game it is today.

    WORD FREAK: HEARTBREAK, TRIUMPH, GENIUS, AND OBSESSION IN THE WORLD OF COMPETITIVE SCRABBLE PLAYERS
    by Stefan Fatsis
    (2001)

    WORD FREAK looks into the world of extreme competitive Scrabble. What began for author Stefan Fatsis as a curious look at the sport for a journal article quickly turned into an obsession for the board game that converted him from a “living room player” into actually competing along with the world’s best players. The book humorously portrays the irreverent crowd that competes at this level and mixes in historical facts about the board game. Fatsis also explains how players must be able to memorize words well above what one would use in normal language usage. This is a provocative look at the world of games and the way the mind works with words.

    THE PROFESSOR AND THE MADMAN: A TALE OF MURDER, INSANITY, AND THE MAKING OF THE OXFORD ENGLISH DICTIONARY
    by Simon Winchester
    (1998)

    The fascinating look into how a madman and murderer submitted over ten thousand definitions of words for the first Oxford English Dictionary. Genius Dr. W.C. Minor was diagnosed with schizophrenia after his experiences in the American Civil War. After traveling to London where he killed a man and was sent to an insane asylum, Minor came across a leaflet asking for volunteers to help compile a history of the English language. Minor wrote to the editor and offered his services while remaining vague about his circumstances. Author Simon Winchester not only chronicles this interesting man but also the momentous effort it took to build the Oxford English Dictionary as a way to help document the etymology of words in the English language.

  • hip hop and history 01

    Ever wonder how librarians hone their recommendation skills? Sometimes, our librarians play a game we call the 6 Degrees of reading. The rules are simple: choose six books, each connected somehow to the book above it, with the last book in the list connecting to the first. Periodically, we like the results enough to share them with you.

    This week, history and hip hop collide, and it's electric! (see what I did there?)

    ALEXANDER HAMILTON
    by Ron Chernow
    (2004)

    The book the hit Broadway musical was based on. Until recently Alexander Hamilton was not as well esteemed and avidly written about like the other gifted men of his time. However, Chernow makes the case that Hamilton should be considered one of the most important Founding Fathers arguing that without his financial brilliance and creation of public finance, the United States might not have survived beyond the first few years.

    HAMILTON: THE REVOLUTION
    by Lin-Manuel Miranda
    (2016)

    This book takes readers behind the scenes of the new Broadway hit musical based on the life of Founding Father, Alexander Hamilton. Mixing a variety of musical styles including hip-hop, pop, R&B, and musical theater, the story gives insight into Hamilton's life, the Revolutionary war, and the early American time period.

    YOUR FAVORITE BAND IS KILLING ME: WHAT POP MUSIC RIVALRIES REVEAL ABOUT THE MEANING OF LIFE
    by Steven Hyden
    (2016)

    At some point, we've all argued why we prefer one band over another from their lyrics to antics off the stage. Author Steven Hyden uses 19 different band rivalries from the famous Beatles/Rolling Stones competition to hip-hop artists, Biggie vs. Tupac and what deeper truths we can learn from these rivalries.

    BIRDMEN: THE WRIGHT BROTHERS, GLENN CURTISS, AND THE BATTLE TO CONTROL THE SKIES
    by Lawrence Goldstone
    (2014)

    An interesting exploration of the rivalry between the Wright brothers and Glenn Hammond Curtiss to be the first to invent a machine capable of sustained flight. Goldstone takes readers through their design innovations, false starts, and dreams of the ultimate prize which was finally captured by Wilbur and Orville Wright.

    TESLA: INVENTOR OF THE ELECTRICAL AGE
    by W. Bernard Carlson
    (2013)

    When you think of inventions using electricity, Thomas Edison is more widely known than the eccentric Nicola Tesla. In his book, however, author W. Bernard Carlson, sheds light on the Tesla, his inventions, and his many successes and failures. This book looks at the what, how, and why he was motivated to invent.

    BENJAMIN FRANKLIN: AN AMERICAN LIFE
    by Walter Isaacson
    (2004)

    This book traces the life of one of America's great Founding Fathers, Benjamin Franklin. Franklin was a man of a variety of interests many of which have been woven into our American heritage. From his early days as a printer to scientist, inventor, and politician, Benjamin Franklin was one of the most accomplished men of his age. The book even covers his interest in the power of electricity and his experimentation done with lightning to determine if they were the same.

  • Six Degrees 01

    Ever wonder how librarians hone their recommendation skills? Sometimes, our librarians play a game we call the 6 Degrees of reading. The rules are simple: choose six books, each connected somehow to the book above it, with the last book in the list connecting to the first. Periodically, we like the results enough to share them with you.

    We're celebrating Shakespeare this week (it's his birthday, after all!), and you might surprised with how easy it was to connect him to some of our favorite stars of THE OFFICE. 

    FATES AND FURIES
    by Lauren Groff
    (2015)  

    This novel is a portrait of a marriage with the various secrets and deceptions of the husband and wife unfolding as the story progresses. The first half focuses on the husband, Lotto, a struggling actor who achieves considerable success writing plays instead. The second half focuses on Matilde as she grapples with tragic loss and her own dark past.

    THE TRAGEDY OF ARTHUR
    by Arthur Phillips  
    (2011)  

    Arthur and his sister Dana are presented with a play, purportedly written by William Shakespeare, by their dying father, still serving prison time for fraud. Their father’s dying wish is for his children to publish this never before seen work.

    WILL IN THE WORLD: HOW SHAKESPEARE BECAME SHAKESPEARE
    by Stephen Greenblatt
    (2004)

    This book explores the rise of William Shakespeare from his humble background to become the most famous and influential English playwright in the world. The author paints this portrait within the context of the Elizabethan world in which he grew up and which shaped his theatrical works.  

    BORN WITH TEETH 
    by Kate Mulgrew  
    (2015)

    Starting with her upbringing in Iowa, Kate Mulgrew tells her story of moving to New York to study theater, getting her first television role in the soap opera RYAN’S HOPE and later, her most famous role as Captain Janeway in STAR TREK: VOYAGER. However, she places more emphasis on her personal life, relationship challenges and her attempts to reconnect with the daughter she gave up for adoption.

    IS EVERYONE HANGING OUT BUT ME? (AND OTHER CONCERNS) 
    by Mindy Kaling
    (2011)

    Mindy Kaling, television writer and actor best known for her work in THE OFFICE, offers an array of humorous observations about her work, family, relationship challenges and her struggles with body image issues.

    ONE MORE THING: STORIES AND OTHER STORIES 
    by B.J. Novak
    (2014)  

    Well known for his writing and acting in the television series THE OFFICE, this is a collection of short stories varied and brilliant. The titular story is about a young boy who wins a sweepstakes contest only to discover that collecting the winning may prove more harmful than good for him and his family.

  •  Sewing

    I recently decided to take up quilting because I really wanted to make my son’s baby blanket myself.  While I have done some sewing, I never tried quilting since it always looked so intimidating!  It turns out that quilting really isn’t that difficult.  I was able to teach myself patchwork quilting and needle turn appliqué with a few books, online tutorials, and some advice from the wonderful ladies at the Cotton Shop.  My baby blanket turned out so well that I’ve decided to keep going, and I even made my husband a quilt for Christmas!  Here are some helpful books to begin quilting: 

    3.6 Complete Guide to QuiltingCOMPLETE GUIDE TO QUILTING
    By Better Homes and Gardens
    (2002)

    If you already have a project in mind and just need help figuring out how to get it done, this is a great comprehensive resource.  I really like using this book as a reference guide.  It contains easy to follow step-by-step instructions for a wide variety of techniques, making it easier for you to turn your vision into reality. 

     

    3.6 All Things QuiltingALL THINGS QUILTING WITH ALEX ANDERSON: FROM FIRST STEP TO LAST STITCH
    By Alex Anderson
    (2015)

    My favorite thing about this book is that all of the instructional pictures demonstrate the steps for both right-handed and left-handed people.  It even color codes the cutting material so that it’s easy to visually pick out which one is which.  This book is also a comprehensive guide; although it is structured to walk you through each stage of your quilt rather than serve as an index for techniques. 

     

    3.6 Quilting BasicsQUILTING BASICS: A STEP-BY-STEP COURSE FOR FIRST-TIME QUILTERS
    By Michael Caputo
    (2016)

    This book is set up a little differently.  It gives all the preparatory information first, and then skips to the end with binding and caring for your projects.  Then it uses twelve workshop projects to teach all of the in-between stuff.  The advantage here is that you’ll end up with lots of practice on small projects instead of practicing on an important quilt you have in mind. 

     

    3.6 Visual Guide to Patchwork QuiltingVISUAL GUIDE TO PATCHWORK & QUILTING: FABRIC SELECTION TO FINISHING TECHNIQUES & BEYOND
    By Stash Books
    (2017)

    Aspects that make this book especially helpful are the quilt block tables that explain what size to cut your shapes in order to make different sized blocks, and detailed photographic instructions for different appliqué techniques for both hand and machine sewing.  I especially appreciated that the hand-sewing instructions included pictures for both right and left-handed sewers. 

     

    3.6 Quilt as DesiredQUILT AS DESIRED: YOUR GUIDE TO STRAIGHT-LINE AND FREE-MOTION QUILTING
    By Carlene C. Frable
    (2007)

    Different than all the other books listed, the main focus here is the actual quilting part of the project.  It offers detailed instructions for quilting with straight lines, and quilting free-motion patterns on a regular domestic machine.  Each quilting design also has a benefits and drawbacks box, which will help you decide on a design that will work for your project.

     
  • Travel Guides

     

    With the pleura of travel guide books available as you plan a trip, it can be overwhelming to try to pick the right one. Navigating your way through the pages can be a chore, and should you really have to buy several guides to get you through the vacation you’ve worked so hard to perfect? Fear not fellow traveler! The library has you covered! We carry many guide books to locations all across the globe and this guide will help you choose just the right travel guide for you. 

    Before picking a guide, you might ask yourself what you are looking for in a travel guide. Do you want packing tips, hotel information, popular sights, off the grid locales, culture or health information? Do you just want an overview of a country you’re interested in? Travel guides can help with all of this, but some are better at particular things than others.

    DK EYEWITNESS TRAVEL: With lots of pictures and illustrations, these books are beautiful, and great for helping plan the perfect trip. These guides provide a robust background of the history and culture of your destination and interesting facts and visual dissections of top spots to visit. The format is friendly and inviting.

    LONELY PLANET: Often regarded as the essential travel guide for budget travel or finding off the beaten path spots, LONELY PLANET guides have great information and are easy to take with you as you travel. In my experience, these guides can have almost too much information and too many options to weed through as you travel. However, they can’t be beat for finding a great off the grid spot or unique outdoor adventure in most locations.

    RICK STEVES’: A master of travel guide writing, Rick Steves’ books have a leisurely, “travel writing”-esc feel and are enjoyable to peruse even if you’re not planning a trip. He updates his guides regularly and has a good mix of tourist attractions, cultural information, and hot hidden spots. It is worth noting that Steves’ only has guides for European destinations.

    FROMMER’S: Geared towards an American, novice or retired traveling audience, Frommer’s guides provide a warm security blanket of information as you travel to the most sought out places. These guides include star ratings of destinations as well as amenities and price ratings from “inexpensive” to “very expensive”, so you’ll know just what you’re walking into.

    FODOR’S: In my opinion, Fodor’s are some of the easiest guides to use. They are logically structured and organized and give all the essential information you need for travel. Their no-nonsense approach does not include many pictures or maps, but that’s something I like about them. It’s a very basic and simple to navigate guide.

    ROUGH GUIDES: Like Frommer's and Fodor's, these books have all the basic information you need to familiarize yourself with a new place. All three tend to be a little on the hefty side, which makes them a bit cumbersome to use while traveling, but the city grid style maps in the Rough Guides are really helpful. I sometimes make a copy of the map pages to carry with me as I go.

    If books aren't your thing, we also have a database called Global Road Warrior, which provides information about over 175 countries, their culture, history, food, traditions and holidays, people, climate, and a lot more. I used it to find information about India for an upcoming trip and learned how not to make a fool of myself when greeting people and what to do to ensure I don’t offend anyone when refusing food that might make my delicate American stomach sick. So, to sum up, use the library to help plan your next amazing trip!

  • 1000words

    Recently we have been evaluating the books in the 700’s to see what is checking out (or not), what is falling apart, and where we may need to order more books on a certain topic. I’ve been working on the photography books and have discovered some really great reads! We have tons of books about taking great photos, editing photos, and books about famous photographers. Here are a few that stood out to me when I took a closer look at this section of our nonfiction collection.

    Digital Photography Through the YearDIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY THROUGH THE YEAR
    by Tom Ang
    (2012)  

    Learn how to capture the moments and moods of every season with all the ideas and inspiration you need for a whole year's worth of photography.  

     

    The Heart of the Great AloneTHE HEART OF THE GREAT ALONE: SCOTT, SHAKLETON, AND ANTARCTIC PHOTOGRAPHY
    by David Hempleman-Adams
    (2009)  

    The photographs recorded by Herbert George Ponting and Frank Hurley of two epic Antarctic expeditions are presented along with a narrative which draws on the photographers' writings and other archival material from the Royal Collection.  

     

    Digital Photography Complete CourseDIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY COMPLETE COURSE
    by David Taylor
    (2015)  

    This book helps you to build your photography skills week-by-week. The Digital Photography Complete Course is the perfect one-on-one learning program for any aspiring photographer.  

     

    Photos FramedPHOTOS FRAMED: A FRESH LOOK AT THE WORLD’S MOST MEMORABLE PHOTOGRAPHS
    by Ruth Thomson
    (2014)  

    Explores some of the most famous photographs in history, including Stephen Dalton's "Ladybird Take-off," Charles C. Ebbets' "Lunchtime atop a Skyscraper," and Neil Leifer's "Muhammad Ali versus Sonny Liston."

     

    At First SightAT FIRST SIGHT: PHOTOGRAPHY AND THE SMITHSONIAN
    by Merry A. Foresta
    (2003)  

    The Smithsonian holds more than 13 million images spanning over 150 years of taking and collecting photographs. This largely unknown body of photography (most never before published) represents nothing less than the Smithsonian's effort, in the name of all Americans, to describe and comprehend the world.  

     

    Ansel Adams Our National ParksANSEL ADAMS: OUR NATIONAL PARKS
    by Ansel Adams
    (1992)    

    A collection of work from one of the strongest supporters of the National Park System includes his photographs, letters, speeches, writings, and personal notes about the critical issues facing the parks.

  • stars

    There is probably no summertime activity more iconic than hanging out under the night sky and stargazing. In our Utah desert, you have a great view of the Perseid Meteor Shower in August, as well as general constellations, and maybe even the Milky Way if you are lucky. If you are not up for camping under the stars, check out the BYU Planetarium (http://planetarium.byu.edu) for their Friday night shows. At the library, we have lots of books on astronomy and astrophysics in the 520s. Check out some of the titles from our collection to prepare for your big night out under the stars! 

    8.8 Stargazing for DummiesSTARGAZING FOR DUMMIES 
    By Steve Owens
    (2013) 

    This is a great place to start if you know nothing about stargazing or astronomy in general. This guide teaches you how to read star maps, a little of the history of astronomy, and an overview of any equipment you might want.  

     

     

     

    8.8 StarfinderSTARFINDER
    By Carole Stott
    (2010) 

    This one is by far my favorite star book in our collection because it has a moveable star map right on the front cover! There are also great photos and illustrations in the first half with more details monthly star maps in the second half. Definitely check this one out just for the novelty! 

    Some people prefer to stargaze in the peace and quiet of nature, but I prefer to have a little background music. I like to think of it as part of the soundtrack of my life. If you want some nice instrumental stuff, go to Gustav Holst’s iconic THE PLANETS album. For something more modern, check out anything by Coldplay. Really, I think that most albums by Coldplay have a sort of cosmic, I-feel-connected-to-the-universe vibe, but I may be biased. Definitely listen to A SKY FULL OF STARS, YELLOW, and the SPEED OF SOUND. If you are feeling adventurous, try THE RACE FOR SPACE by Public Service Broadcasting. All of these titles can be found in our catalog by clicking on the links provided.  

    No matter how you prepare for your fun night under the stars, be sure to take some flashlights, blankets and pillows, bug spray, and have fun!

  •  Chocolate 3

    Over the years I have successfully cut back on the amount of junk food I eat. That is, I have successfully cut back on everything but chocolate. The darker the better. For me, really good dark chocolate almost has a slight citrus flavor mixed in with all of that bitter, creamy deliciousness.

    After sharing my love of chocolate, you can probably imagine how excited I am that the lovely folks at The Chocolate Conspiracy are coming to the library to talk about the health benefits of chocolate, and they’re giving us an overview of how artisanal chocolate is made. 

    Here are the details:

    Learn It: The Health Benefits of Chocolate
    Thursday, September 28th
    7:00 pm in room 260

    To get us all by until then, here are a few of the books we have at the library dedicated to the creation of my favorite treat:

    9.12 Great Moments in Chocolate HistoryGREAT MOMENTS IN CHOCOLATE HISTORY
    By Howard-Yana Shapiro
    (2015)

    Packed with facts and photos, this book reveals the untold story of chocolate. Did you know that M&Ms were invented for WWII soldiers as the chocolate that wouldn't melt in their hands? Or that Thomas Jefferson predicted that chocolate would outstrip coffee as the most popular drink in America? 

    9.12 The True History of ChocolateTHE TRUE HISTORY OF CHOCOLATE
    By Sophie D. Coe
    (2013)

    Travel around the world as you discover chocolate’s origins in Central America, its journey to Europe as the drink of kings, and its eventual journey to the plates of the masses. 

     

     

     

    9.12 Choclate covered KatieCHOCOLATE-COVERED KATIE : OVER 80 DELICIOUS RECIPES THAT ARE SECRETLY GOOD FOR YOU
    By Katie Higgins
    (2015)

    The healthy dessert blogger Katie Higgins shares over 80 never-before-seen recipes that use only real ingredients, without any unnecessary fats, sugars, or empty calories.

    9.12 Chocolate Sweet ScienceCHOCOLATE: SWEET SCIENCE AND DARK SECRETS OF THE WORLD'S FAVORITE TREAT
    By Kay Frydenborg
    (2015)

    Geared toward a teen audience, this book captures the history, science, and economic and cultural implications of the harvesting of cacao and creation of chocolate.

     

     

    9.12 Inside Charlies Chocolate FactoryINSIDE CHARLIE'S CHOCOLATE FACTORY: THE COMPLETE STORY OF WILLY WONKA, THE GOLDEN TICKET, AND ROALD DAHL'S MOST FAMOUS CREATION
    By Lucy Mangan
    (2014)

    If we’re talking about chocolate, we’ve also got to talk about CHARLIE AND THE CHOCOLATE FACTORY.  This book explores the lasting legacy of Roald Dahl's popular book, examining the development of the original story and characters, its social history, and the varying film and stage adaptations.

     

  • armchair

     

    I don’t know about you, but I’d love to be able to take an extended vacation from my daily responsibilities and travel the world. Unfortunately I’m not independently wealthy, so that doesn’t look like it’s going to happen any time soon!

    Lucky for me, we have thousands of books at the library that can transport me to another location just by opening the front cover. And best of all, it’s free with my library card! Below are some of the most memorable trips I’ve taken across the globe, all giving me a new perspective and helping ease my wanderlust just a bit.

    APPALACHIAN TRAIL

    Distance from Me to YouTHE DISTANCE FROM ME TO YOU
    by Marina Gessner
    (2015)

    I read this book just a few weeks before my friend Jake began his 2,659 mile trek on the Pacific Crest Trail. I loved following his 140 day journey from Mexico to Canada as he posted updates, videos, and pictures on Facebook. While this book covers the Appalachian Trail from Maine to Georgia, many of the elements of a long trail hike were the same. For example, I loved reading about trail angels, and then seeing the acts of kindness Jake benefited from on the trail. Because I’d already spent some time on the trail due to reading this book, I felt like I had a better understanding of what he was experiencing on his own journey across America.

     

    EUROPE

    WanderlostWANDERLOST
    by Jen Malone
    (2016)

    I went on a Mediterranean cruise in 2008 and have wanted to go back ever since! In particular I’d love to go back to Italy. In addition, I’d love to explore more of Europe, there’s so much to see and such great food to eat! I loved traveling to Amsterdam, Salzburg, Vienna, Prague, Venice, Cinque Terre, and Monaco along with Aubree and her busload of senior citizens.  

     

     

     

    AFRICA

    Kisses from KatieKISSES FROM KATIE: A STORY OF RELENTLESS LOVE AND REDEMPTION
    by Katie Davis
    (2012)

    While I’ve never been to Uganda, after reading this book I felt like I had a better idea about the country, culture, and people. In the midst of her senior year in high school, Katie and her dad went on a short mission trip to Uganda during her Christmas break. Katie had no idea that this trip would change her life forever. After taking a gap year to spend more time serving the Ugandan people, she eventually decided to not only move to Uganda, but to adopt 13 girls and establish a non-profit organization that helps many more. I was riveted by this story and how Katie found her purpose in life.  

     

     

    ANTARCTICA

    No Horizon is so FarNO HORIZON IS SO FAR: TWO WOMEN AND THEIR EXTRORDINARY JOURNEY ACROSS AMERICA
    by Liv Arnesen and Ann Bancroft
    (2003)

    This biography was an insightful look at the preparation and determination needed to survive on a trek across the South Pole. Although Liv and Ann grew up across the world from each other, both developed a fascination with Antarctica and a desire to be the first women to ski-sail across the continent via the Shackleton Glacier. I enjoyed reading about their chilly adventures from the comfort of my warm home!  

     

     

    OUTER SPACE
    An Astronauts Guide to Life on EarthAN ASTRONAUT’S GUIDE TO LIFE ON EARTH
    by Chris Hadfield
    (2013)

    What better way to end our trip around the globe than to head to the stars?!? I learned so much about what it takes physically and mentally to prepare for life on the International Space Station. I first heard about this book while listening to an NPR story about how food is prepared and eaten in space. Chris has multiple entertaining YouTube videos recorded during his time floating above the earth that helped me get a better mental picture of what it would be like to live in zero gravity.  

     

     

     

    While I still want to explore much more of the world, for now I think I can be satisfied with a good book!

  • Cookbooks

    I love to flip through cookbooks! I like to read through the ingredients and see a picture of the delicious end result. I love it even more if the cookbook is more than just recipes, if it has a narrative to go along with the recipes; I get sucked in and often read the entire book. 

    A few months ago, we were evaluating the cookbook area of the library and I savored spending time looking at these books. Over the few months we were working on this project I began making a list of the cookbooks that I felt were extremely well done. They had gorgeous pictures and intriguing stories behind the recipes. I even encouraged a few of my co-workers to tell me about the cookbooks they saw as standouts. Today I’m sharing just a few of the most beautiful cookbooks in our collection. 

    3.20 The Farmette CookbookTHE FARMETTE COOKBOOK: RECIPES AND ADVENTURES FROM MY LIFE ON AN IRISH FARM
    By Imen McDonnell
    (2016)

    From gorgeous pictures of the rolling hills of Ireland to recipes for Farmhouse Milk Bread, Maple Roasted Parsnips, and Irish wedding cake, this book has it all. Interspersed between the recipes are snippets from Imen’s life and the story of how this American city girl found her way to a working Irish farm. I love that the recipes give the ingredients in both the US and metric measurements. Scullery notes found at the end of many recipes give additional information for the home cook.

     

    3.20 Breakfast for DinnerBREAKFAST FOR DINNER
    By Lindsay Landis
    (2013)

    I love breakfast for dinner so this book was an instant hit for me! It includes many traditional breakfast recipes like Eggs Benedict but adds a twist to make the recipe a bit more filling for dinner time. Now you can have Steak and Eggs Benedict at the end of a long day. In addition to main dishes, this cookbook includes sides, starters, desserts and drinks. Using breakfast ingredients to make your dinner has never tasted better. 

     

    3.20 MamushkaMAMUSHKA 
    By Olia Hercules
    (2015)

    This book features recipes from Ukraine and Eastern Europe with stunning photographs. I loved the first paragraph from the introduction, “Mamushka…is not actually real word. My brother Sasha and I watched The Addams Family film for the first time in 1996 (everything came about five years late in post-Soviet Ukraine.) And at some point during the movie, a bunch of American actors suddenly spoke a made-up Eastern European language and danced the mamushka—“the dance of brotherly love” taught to the family by their Cossack cousins. Our whole family found this part of the film irresistibly hilarious and since then my brother and I renamed our mum Mamushka.” With this friendly beginning, I was hooked on taking a closer look at this cookbook. 

     

    3.20 Cooking with Mary BerryCOOKING WITH MARY BERRY
    By Mary Berry
    (2016)

    As a fan of The Great British Baking Show and DK books this book caught my attention. Mary Berry shares “simple recipes—great for families and friends” and in classic DK style this cookbook shows cooking techniques step by step. I particularly like that there are variations and notes to the cook throughout the book with tips and tricks. 

     

    3.20 My Two SouthsMY TWO SOUTHS: BLENDING THE FLAVORS OF INDIA INTO A SOUTHERN KITCHEN
    By Asha Gomez
    (2016)

    This cover is stunning, as are the end papers! Asha calls her style of cuisine “two souths cooking” with the flavors and dishes being rooted in her home country of India and her current home in Atlanta, Georgia. Each recipe has a story explaining the importance of the featured recipe to. There are many drool-worthy pictures and recipes featured, including the Banana Beignets. Yum! 

     

    3.20 Cooking LightCOOKING LIGHT GLOBAL KITCHEN: THE WORLD’S MOST DELICIOUS FOOD MADE EASY
    By David Joachim
    (2014)

    Get ready to explore the culinary world! From East Asia to Europe to North and Central America there are delicious foods in each and every country and region. The author challenges home cooks to taste the world in their own kitchen. I like how each chapter starts with a taste of the region being presented sharing the prominent spices and flavors, followed by photo heavy recipes. Each recipe clearly states the hands-on time and total time needed which can be helpful when planning to make the dish. 

     

    3.20 Food AnatomyFOOD ANATOMY: THE CURIOUS PARTS AND PIECES OF OUR EDIBLE WORLD
    By Julia Rothman
    (2016)

    While this book isn’t a cookbook (it doesn’t have any recipes in the traditional sense at least), I thought it still deserved a place on this list. The books above all have photographs highlighting the food mentioned. This book on the other hand, is filled with hand drawn and colored illustrations. Rothman gives a brief history of food before illustrating fruits, vegetable, meats, spices, street foods, and desserts that can be found the world over. I found this book to be completely captivating!

     
  • best books 15 adults

    Fifty seems like such a huge number but when I looked through my list of books read last year, whittling it down was brutal! There were so many amazing titles published in 2015 and I was able to read a whole bunch of them thanks to my recent attempts to limit my television time….possibly a case of trading one vice for another?

    Hopefully we will have a lot of people attend our “Best Books of 2015” event next week as we share our favorites.  With this post, I decided to give you my top five 2015 books that did not make it to my list of 20 I get to share at the program.  These books were very enjoyable and just barely missed the cut.

    Secret ChordTHE SECRET CHORD
    By Geraldine Brooks

    As with all Brooks’ novels, this is a richly detailed piece of historical fiction which presents a unique twist on events or people already familiar.  THE SECRET CHORD tells of King David’s rise to power and subsequent fall from grace.  While I enjoyed the novel, I did not love it as much as I have some of the author’s previous works such as YEAR OF WONDERS and PEOPLE OF THE BOOK (which I recommend frequently).

     

     

     

    Other DaughterTHE OTHER DAUGHTER
    By Lauren Willig

    Another favorite author of mine, Willig writes mainly historical romances.  Her PINK CARNATION series first caught my attention years ago.  However, she also writes stand-alone novels that I look forward to reading.  They are light and fast-paced with fun, relatable characters. THE OTHER DAUGHTER tells the story of Rachel Woodley, the illegitimate daughter of an English Earl, and her attempts to confront her father with his abandonment of her and her mother.

     

     

     

    Precious OneTHE PRECIOUS ONE
    By Marisa De los Santos

    THE PRECIOUS ONE is also a book about a daughter looking to come to terms with her father’s abandonment.  Taisy hasn’t been in contact with her father in over a decade, so when he calls her and asks for her help in writing his memoir she reluctantly agrees.  The story is told with alternating narratives between Taisy and Willow, Taisy’s teenaged half-sister who seems to have all the love and attention Taisy’s father was never able to give her.  A great novel about family and forgiveness. 

     

     

     

    NeurotribesNEUROTRIBES: THE LEGACY OF AUTISM AND THE FUTURE OF NEURODIVERSITY  
    By Steve Silberman

    This is a groundbreaking book about the history and future of autism.  What I really admired about this book was the author’s ability to present the science and history of the topic in a very personal and conversational manner.  He tells of people and their stories which made it a riveting read.

     

     

     

     

    Natural Born HeroesNATURAL BORN HEROES: HOW A DARING BAND OF MISFITS MASTERED THE LOST SECRETS OF STRENGTH AND ENDURANCE  
    By Christopher McDougall

    McDougall is best known for writing BORN TO RUN which seemed to start an entire movement of barefoot running.  In this new book he searches other areas of history to find the secrets to history’s greatest heroes and athletes.  With a bit of World War II history, a fascinating look at the island of Crete, and inspirational stories of amazing physical abilities, this is a great choice for armchair athletes like me.

    Please join us next week for even more recommendations from 2015! Plus, there will be cupcakes. Come for the books, stay for the cupcakes. 

  • BB 2016 FB

     

    On Wednesday, February 22nd we will present our annual Best Books event!  This consists of three presentations (though participants only have time to visit two) on the best children’s, teen, and adult books our librarians read in 2016.  We’ve been reading furiously all year to compile our lists and are so excited to talk about them.

    For the next few days we will be giving you a little preview. Below is a list of five books that ALMOST made it into my best adult books of 2016.  Last year I read over 100 books and so many of them were amazing.  These five books were great….just not as great as the 20 I will be talking about on the 22nd.

    The DollhouseTHE DOLLHOUSE 
    by Fiona Davis
    (2016)

    I love books that weave stories from history with those in present times.  THE DOLLHOUSE is a wonderful example of this popular writing style.  Here a journalist becomes obsessed with the life of a neighbor in her rent controlled New York apartment building. The more she learns about the building, its history, and its tenants, the more desperate she becomes for more and more personal details.  The mystery, drama, and history of the story kept me reading to the last surprising twist.

     

     

    Curious Charms

    CURIOUS CHARMS OF ARTHUR PEPPER
    by Phaedra Patrcik 
    (2016)

    Arthur Pepper’s life is precisely orchestrated just as it was before his wife Miriam died. However, on the one-year anniversary of her death, Arthur discovers a charm bracelet he’s never seen before and begins a journey of hope and healing.  This is a great choice for those who loved THE UNLIKELY PILGRIMAGE OF HAROLD FRY and A MAN CALLED OVE.

     

     

    City of Mirrors

    CITY OF MIRRORS
    by Justin Cronin
    (2016)

    This is the last volume in THE PASSAGE trilogy.  I have loved every installment of this epic post-apocalyptic horror series.  The final volume was an exciting and satisfying conclusion.  Since I already talked about this series in previous years’ Best Books events, I decided to leave it off this year to be able to highlight other stellar 2016 publications.  But for horror readers, this really was a standout conclusion and shouldn’t be missed.

     

    Lab GirlLABGIRL
    by Hope Jahren 
    (2016)

    I agonized over not including this specific title in my list because it really is a wonderfully written memoir.  Jahren tells about her adventures as a female scientist in a very male dominated academic environment.  She talks about her special friendship and collaborative relationship with lab partner, Bill.  Add to that an amazingly honest and revealing description of her struggles with mental illness and you begin to see why this is such a special book.  Maybe I should swap it out on my list….ahhhh, I can’t decide!!

     

    Frontier GritFRONTIER GRIT: THE UNLIKELY TRUE STORIES OF DARING PIONEER WOMEN
    by Marianne Monson 
    (2016)

    Twelve amazing women who helped to settle the west are spotlighted in this cumulative biography.  Two of my favorite sketches were about Nellie Cashman who, in her 80s, mushed a dog sled 750 miles in seventeen days and Martha Hughes Cannon who became the first female State Senator in the United States, defeating her own husband who was also on the ballot.  These women are inspiring and I loved reading about their nonconventional lives and pioneering spirits.  

      

    It is so hard to pick favorites with so many talented writers supplying us amazing books for every taste.  Hopefully you can join us on the 22nd to see our complete lists.  We will have delicious cupcakes and exciting door prizes as well, so bring a friend or two!

     

     

  • BB 2017 FB

    Each year we put together a list of the top 60 best children’s books (according to our children’s librarians). As we have been whittling down our lists some titles are harder to take off—almost painful because they are great books. These five books are fantastic! Truly amazing! Yet they just didn’t make the list. If it was the 65 best children’s books, these titles would have been on there.

    As we keep you in suspense as to our top 60 books (which we will reveal at our Best Books program next Tuesday), take a look at these books that almost made the cut.

    2.14 The Legend of Rock Paper ScissorsTHE LEGEND OF ROCK PAPER SCISSORS
    By Drew Daywalt
    Illustrated by Adam Rex

    This is a great picture book—and I liked it so much that I even bought it! Really, it is a good book. It tells the story of Rock (who lives in the Kingdom of the Backyard) and is the strongest in the land. No one could beat Rock in any challenge. Then (in the Empire of Mom’s Home Office) there lived another warrior named Paper. Once again in this empire there was none who could best Paper. In a third place (the Kitchen Realm) there lived a warrior named Scissors who could not be beaten in all of her challenges. Daywalt and Rex put together a hilarious tale as to why these three warriors battle together (and thus explains the rock, paper, scissors game that children all over the world play). Seriously, this is a pretty funny book. 

     

    2.14 Orphan IslandORPHAN ISLAND
    By Laurel Snyder

    It is not often that you find a Juvenile Fiction title as divisive as this one, or one that can get as many people talking. Orphan Island tells the story of Jinny, a girl who has grown up on a secluded island populated only by nine orphans. Each year, a boat arrives to deliver a new child and the oldest is expected to leave without knowing what awaits them on the boat. But when Jinny’s boat comes, she doesn’t leave and the island – once a perfect, nurturing home – begins to change. This book is in many ways a classic “coming of age” story, but also it isn’t. This book, its setting and its plot are wildly imaginative and are bolstered by truly skillful writing – providing lots of opportunities for discussion. It’s hard to discount the buzz surrounding this book – it’s a National Book Award Longlist Title and it’s on the Mock Newbery list of anyone who has such a list – but it’s also incredible divisive with vocal people arguing about it either way. While this wasn’t one of our favorite books of the year, it’s been discussed too much to leave off our list completely. 

     

    2.14 Real FriendsREAL FRIENDS
    By Shannon Hale
    Illustrated by LeUyen Pham

    Shannon Hale joins up with LeUyen Pham (who also illustrates Shannon’s PRINCESS IN BLACK series) in this graphic novel memoir about making and keeping friends. Shannon and her best friend Adrienne have been best friends since they were little, but when Adrienne becomes friends with the most popular girl in school, things begin to change between them and Shannon questions whether or not she and Adrienne will be able to stay friends. This story is one that most readers will be able to identify with – whether they’ve been bullied by the popular kids or not.  Also, since Shannon Hale is a local author, it’s set in Salt Lake City which is sort of extra fun for kids from Utah. This story is honest and a little heartwarming, and though it didn’t make our final list is a great choice for Raina Telgemeir or Cece Bell fans. 

     

    2.14 Rivers of SunlightRIVERS OF SUNLIGHT: HOW THE SUN MOVES WATER AROUND THE EARTH
    by Molly Bang and Penny Chisholm

    This is a great nonfiction title (which follows up the brilliant book Buried Sunlight: How Fossil Fuels Have Changed the Earth). Bang and Chisholm explain how water moves around the world thanks to the heat of the sun—both through the sun’s part of the water cycle and due to the sun heating various currents in the oceans. This is a book full of information and facts presented in a picture book format so even the younger scientists can understand how water works and how the sun plays a major part to what happens to the water. 

     

    2.14 Harry Millers RunHARRY MILLER'S RUN
    By David Almond
    Illustrated by Salvatore Rubbin

    Most juvenile intermediate books are formula books—ones where they are part of a series and you can predict that the book will (re)introduce the characters in chapter one, throw in a bit of conflict (usually of the same variety as previous books in the series) in chapter two, etc. Not Harry Miller’s Run. This book is a stand-alone story that is beautifully written AND happens to be a juvenile intermediate book. Liam needs to train for an upcoming race and so he talks to his older neighbor (Harry Miller) who happens to have run the same race when he was younger. This is a great story about something seemingly insignificant (like talking to an elderly neighbor) can actually be interesting, fun, and helpful. Plus, the way Harry Miller tells his tale, readers will almost feel like going out for a jog themselves. Almond has written yet another great story—and lucky for us this one is an intermediate book!

     
  • Easy Readers 2

    One of my favorite things I get to do at work is ordering the Easy Reader Nonfiction books (JENF for short). These books are nestled in with the Easy Reader and Very Easy Reader section, but I think they are extra special. These books are a great way for curious minds to learn about all the things they might be interested in – in a language they can read for themselves. 

    Our JENF books are in the red Easy Reader corner of the Children’s Department and are eager to be discovered. Here are some great new JENF series to go hunting for: 

    ROOKIE NATIONAL PARKS

    9.6 Rookie National ParksZION NATIONAL PARK
    By Jodie Shepherd
    (2018)

    Rookie is a series of books from Scholastic, and within the Rookie series there are a lot of series on all kinds of topics – and I don’t think that they are all good, but the National Parks series (new this year!) is definitely worth reading. Each book in this series has facts about the flora and fauna of the National Park in question, the geographical formation, and must-sees within the parks – all on pages full of stunning photographs from inside the national parks. If you have young explorers, definitely bring these books home. 

     

    FLY GUY PRESENTS

    9.6 Fly GuyFLY GUY PRESENTS: CASTLES
    By Tedd Arnold
    (2017)

    Sometimes informational books with popular characters thrown in can seem a little gimmicky, but the Fly Guy Presents series has none of that. These informational books on a variety of topics (everything from Sharks to the White House) have all the fun of Fly Guy stories but with a ton of great facts as well. I love these books, which follow Fly Guy and Buzz on various field trips and are filled with Tedd Arnold’s signature funny illustrations and cool photographs throughout.     

     

    TRANSFORMERS RESCUE BOTS TRAINING ACADEMY

    9.6 FirefightersTRAINING ACADEMY: FIREFIGHTERS!
    By Trey King
    (2016)

    I have to confess that I am not a big Transformers fan so I cannot personally speak to how cool these books are, but my elementary school aged cousins tell me that these books are cool and I’ll take their word for it. From a librarian perspective, this series is great because even though it is fairly new it is already covering a good range of topics (firefighters, monster trucks, under the sea). The pages are a good mix of photographs and illustrations and these books are full of good information. 

     

    RANGER RICK... I WISH

    9.6 I wish I was a GorillaI WISH I WAS A GORILLA
    By Jennifer Bove
    (2018)

    I grew up reading Ranger Rick magazines and this new series of Easy Readers carries all the same good parts of Ranger Rick magazines, but in a compact, focused design focused on beginning readers. This series of books includes volumes focused on other animals like orcas and lions and all are really well done. This book is filled with a ton of information about gorillas – where they live, what they look like, what they eat, and how they care for their families. Plus there are incredible photos courtesy of the National Wildlife Federation.  

     

    YOU SHOULD MEET...

    9.6 Jesse OwensJESSE OWENS
    By Laurie Calkhoven
    (2017)

    If your little readers are curious about real people and the interesting lives they lived, this series is one of my favorites. These books tend to focus on figures that young readers may not have learned about yet (i.e. not another Thomas Edison or Abraham Lincoln bio). This book, about Jesse Owens the African American runner who caused a sensation at the 1936 Berlin Olympics is well written with little readers in mind. Other books to look out for include Mae Jemison and a group biography Women in Science. 

     

    Did we miss any of your favorite Easy Reader Non Fiction sections? Tell us in the comments!

  • fierce 01

     

    #Whatireallyreallywant is for everyone to read about these important women! In no particular order or preference, each tells of a woman you should be aware of and knowledgeable about. #girlpower

    Frida Kahlo by Guillermo Kahlo

    FRIDA KAHLO was a famous surrealist and modern artist and should be remembered as more than just the wife of another famous Mexican artist. She is renowned for her inventive self-portraits and examining the tougher aspects of life through her paintings. This compilation is a first of it’s kind- an illustrated journal complete with Frida’s own thoughts, poems, dreams, sketches, self portraits and more. It covers the last ten years of her life from 1944-1954, in a captivating and sometimes haunting, sometimes witty way. Giving perspective on her turbulent relationship with Diego, living with a debilitating handicap and the ensuing surgeries, and insights on her creative process, this auto biography shines with Frida’s own hand.

    (Portrait of Frida Kahlo by her father, Guillermo Kahlo; public domain)

    diary kahloTHE DIARY OF FRIDA KAHLO: AN INTIMATE SELF-PORTRAIT
    by Frida Kahlo
    (2005)

     

     

     

     

     

    Profile portrait of Catherine II by Fedor Rokotov 1763 Tretyakov galleryCATHERINE THE GREAT was the most renowned and longest-ruling female leader of Russia, reigning from 1762–1796. She came to power after her husband was assassinated and while under her rule Russia became one of the great powers of Europe. Balancing the government, foreign policy, cultural development, domestic rebellion, wars, and welfare of the Russian people were all in her hands. This book accurately captures the life of this great women, giving details to her personal relationships, her well developed philosophical mind, and her successes and struggles in ruling the vast country of Russia.

    (Portrait of Catherine II by Fedor Rokotov; public domain)

    catherine the greatCATHERINE THE GREAT: PORTRAIT OF A WOMAN
    by Robert K. Massie
    (2011)

     

     

     

      

    Marie Curie 1903MARIE SKLODOWSKA CURIE was distinguished physicist and chemist who pioneered research on radioactivity (a term that she coined!). She was the first woman to receive the Nobel Peace Prize, the only woman to win it twice, and the only person to win twice in multiple sciences.  She discovered two elements—polonium and radium. She was the first woman to become a professor at the University of Paris and became the first women to be entombed on her own merits in the Pantheon of Paris. This book is a visual journey through Marie’s life—collages, photos, clippings, drawings—giving a compelling narrative to the fascinating scientific significance of her work, while mixing in romance and intrigue.

    (Portrait from the 1903 Nobel Prize committee; public domain)

    RadioactiveRADIOACTIVE: MARIE & PIERRE CURIE: A TALE OF LOVE AND FALLOUT
    by Lauren Redniss
    (2010)

     

     

     

     

    CleopatraLubowska

    CLEOPATRA has been imagined for centuries by poets, artists and historians alike in attempt to convey her beauty, wealth, power and importance. She was the last acting pharaoh of the Ptolemaic dynasty founded by Alexander the Great. She was married twice to her brothers but her lovers- Julius Caesar and Mark Anthony place her as the most influential woman of the age.  This book separates fact from fiction to reveal in rich detail the dazzling life of this magnetic queen. 

    (Portrait of  dancer Winniefred Foote in Cleopatra costume; public domain, courtesy of the Library of Congress)

    cleopatraCLEOPATRA: A LIFE
    by Stacy Schiff
    (2010)

     

     

     

     

     

    Malala Yousafzai Education for girls 22419395331MALALA YOUSAFZAI is a human rights activist known for her advocacy for education and women.  In her  province of Pakistan the local Taliban sometimes banned girls from attending school. Her family runs a chain of schools in that region and on October 9, 2012 a gunman boarded her school bus, asked for her name and shot her. After intensive recovery Malala is thriving and continues her advocacy against this kind of violence and discrimination. She was named one of TIME magazine’s most influential people in the world, she was the youngest winner of the Nobel Peace prize and she continues to speak at international conventions. This is her powerful story of a family uprooted by global terrorism, the fight for girl’s education, and her beliefs that have already changed the world.

    (Portrait by Simon Davis of the UK Department for International Development; creative commons license)

    malalaI AM MALALA: THE GIRL WHO STOOD UP FOR EDUCATION AND WAS SHOT BY THE TALIBAN
    by Malala Yousafzai
    (2013)

     

     

     

     

     

  • BOP FB event

    Have you ever heard of a Eurasian eagle-owl? If you haven’t, stop what you are doing and go watch a video of this creature. These owls are the largest owl species in the world and are an apex predator in their neck of the woods. They can have a 6ft wingspan and can hunt and kill small deer. That is a serious raptor!

    The first time I learned about the Eurasian eagle-owl was at a bird show put on by Jim Fowers, founder of the Rocky Mountain Bird Rescue. Jim and his assistant were showing off a Eurasian eagle-owl that they take care of at their facility. Jim also has a number of other birds in his care, including owls, hawks, and falcons. The great news is that you can see these birds in person at the library.

    Jim and his assistants will be coming to the Provo City Library on May 22 at 7:00 pm in the Young Special Events Room #201. Come see these birds in life and learn some amazing facts about each of them. You will also be able to learn about conservation, falconry, and the rehabilitation process for raptors. There may even be a flight demonstration. In any case, this is one Learn It event you will not want to miss!

    This is just a little taste of what the library has to offer on raptors. Check out these titles and more in the nonfiction section.

    5.20 OwlsOWLS OF THE WORLD
    by James R. Duncan
    (2016)

    This lavishly illustrated and entertaining book explores many aspects of owls. With a chapter dedicated to each owl family, from the huge eagle owls to the diminutive pygmy owls and owlets, this book will engage people new to the subject as well as those already familiar with the species.

     

    5.21 RaptorsRAPTORS OF NORTH AMERICA: NATURAL HISTORY AND CONSERVATION
    by Noel Snyder
    (2006)

    Did you know that raptors are a key species in maintaining balance in an ecosystem? In this book, you will learn all about different raptors in North America and their importance to other species in their habitats. If our Birds of Prey event piqued your interest in conservation, this is a great book to learn more.