Share this Page

Intermediate Fiction

  • BB 2017 FB

    Each year we put together a list of the top 60 best children’s books (according to our children’s librarians). As we have been whittling down our lists some titles are harder to take off—almost painful because they are great books. These five books are fantastic! Truly amazing! Yet they just didn’t make the list. If it was the 65 best children’s books, these titles would have been on there.

    As we keep you in suspense as to our top 60 books (which we will reveal at our Best Books program next Tuesday), take a look at these books that almost made the cut.

    2.14 The Legend of Rock Paper ScissorsTHE LEGEND OF ROCK PAPER SCISSORS
    By Drew Daywalt
    Illustrated by Adam Rex

    This is a great picture book—and I liked it so much that I even bought it! Really, it is a good book. It tells the story of Rock (who lives in the Kingdom of the Backyard) and is the strongest in the land. No one could beat Rock in any challenge. Then (in the Empire of Mom’s Home Office) there lived another warrior named Paper. Once again in this empire there was none who could best Paper. In a third place (the Kitchen Realm) there lived a warrior named Scissors who could not be beaten in all of her challenges. Daywalt and Rex put together a hilarious tale as to why these three warriors battle together (and thus explains the rock, paper, scissors game that children all over the world play). Seriously, this is a pretty funny book. 

     

    2.14 Orphan IslandORPHAN ISLAND
    By Laurel Snyder

    It is not often that you find a Juvenile Fiction title as divisive as this one, or one that can get as many people talking. Orphan Island tells the story of Jinny, a girl who has grown up on a secluded island populated only by nine orphans. Each year, a boat arrives to deliver a new child and the oldest is expected to leave without knowing what awaits them on the boat. But when Jinny’s boat comes, she doesn’t leave and the island – once a perfect, nurturing home – begins to change. This book is in many ways a classic “coming of age” story, but also it isn’t. This book, its setting and its plot are wildly imaginative and are bolstered by truly skillful writing – providing lots of opportunities for discussion. It’s hard to discount the buzz surrounding this book – it’s a National Book Award Longlist Title and it’s on the Mock Newbery list of anyone who has such a list – but it’s also incredible divisive with vocal people arguing about it either way. While this wasn’t one of our favorite books of the year, it’s been discussed too much to leave off our list completely. 

     

    2.14 Real FriendsREAL FRIENDS
    By Shannon Hale
    Illustrated by LeUyen Pham

    Shannon Hale joins up with LeUyen Pham (who also illustrates Shannon’s PRINCESS IN BLACK series) in this graphic novel memoir about making and keeping friends. Shannon and her best friend Adrienne have been best friends since they were little, but when Adrienne becomes friends with the most popular girl in school, things begin to change between them and Shannon questions whether or not she and Adrienne will be able to stay friends. This story is one that most readers will be able to identify with – whether they’ve been bullied by the popular kids or not.  Also, since Shannon Hale is a local author, it’s set in Salt Lake City which is sort of extra fun for kids from Utah. This story is honest and a little heartwarming, and though it didn’t make our final list is a great choice for Raina Telgemeir or Cece Bell fans. 

     

    2.14 Rivers of SunlightRIVERS OF SUNLIGHT: HOW THE SUN MOVES WATER AROUND THE EARTH
    by Molly Bang and Penny Chisholm

    This is a great nonfiction title (which follows up the brilliant book Buried Sunlight: How Fossil Fuels Have Changed the Earth). Bang and Chisholm explain how water moves around the world thanks to the heat of the sun—both through the sun’s part of the water cycle and due to the sun heating various currents in the oceans. This is a book full of information and facts presented in a picture book format so even the younger scientists can understand how water works and how the sun plays a major part to what happens to the water. 

     

    2.14 Harry Millers RunHARRY MILLER'S RUN
    By David Almond
    Illustrated by Salvatore Rubbin

    Most juvenile intermediate books are formula books—ones where they are part of a series and you can predict that the book will (re)introduce the characters in chapter one, throw in a bit of conflict (usually of the same variety as previous books in the series) in chapter two, etc. Not Harry Miller’s Run. This book is a stand-alone story that is beautifully written AND happens to be a juvenile intermediate book. Liam needs to train for an upcoming race and so he talks to his older neighbor (Harry Miller) who happens to have run the same race when he was younger. This is a great story about something seemingly insignificant (like talking to an elderly neighbor) can actually be interesting, fun, and helpful. Plus, the way Harry Miller tells his tale, readers will almost feel like going out for a jog themselves. Almond has written yet another great story—and lucky for us this one is an intermediate book!

     
  •  Choose Your Own Adventure

    Before there were video games there were Choose Your Own Adventure books.

    I remember the thrill I got as a kid coming to the end of a chapter and having to decide, do I go down the shadowy path (turn to page 25), or knock on the heavy oak door (turn to page 56). There was something delightfully delicious about being able to choose how the story would turn out.

    I am happy to say that even with modern computer adventure games Choose Your Own Adventure books are still popular. Now readers have a variety of adventure options in both the fiction and informational sections. 

    Choose Your Own Adventure

    11.19 Abominable SnowmanTHE ABOMINABLE SNOWMAN
    By R. A Montgomery
    (2005)

    This is the classic series that you may have read as a child.  Still kind of silly, but guaranteed to be fun.The library has over 30 different titles in this series, including some featuring popular super heroes. 

     

    Choose Your Own Adventure JR.

    11.19 CaravanCARAVAN
    By R.A. Montgomery
    (1987)

    This is a version of the original series for a younger (2nd-3rd grade) reader.  It is even more silly, and has fun cartoonish illustrations. 

     

    Interactive History Adventure

    11.19 Ancient ChinaANCIENT CHINA
    By Terry Collins
    (2012)

    Do you have a kid who loves the I Survived series?  This is an informational series that has interactive adventures based on real historic events.  The library has more than 50 titles in this series, but they are scattered throughout the informational section.  The best way to find them is to type “interactive history adventure” in the search box in the online catalog. 

     

    Midnight Arcade

    11.19 Crypt QuestCRYPT QUEST/SPACE BATTLES
    By Gabriel Soria
    (2018)

    When some kids get trapped in a haunted 80's era video arcade, the Midnight Arcade, they must play their way out of danger, ultimately controlling whether they live . . . or die!  This is a new series in the Choose Your Own format.  The second in the series comes out in September. 

     
  • funny friendship books 01

    Find them in the catalog:

    MY HAPPY LIFE

    BINK AND GOLLIE: BEST FRIENDS FOREVER

    DORY AND THE REAL TRUE FRIEND

  • illustrated intermediate 01

    Find them in the catalog: 

    THE BAD GUYS

    RICKY RICOTTA’S MIGHTY ROBOT

    GAME OVER, SUPER RABBIT BOY!

  • 11.27 Raising Readers

    Reading aloud to children leads to children being able to read themselves. It is necessary to have books available at home for children to pick up on their own to read and explore. 

    It may be obvious to state, but each child has different books that interest and engage them. My son loved the MAGIC TREE HOUSE series by Mary Pope Osborne, so I bought the first half of the series. When my daughter got to the age of beginning chapter books I tried to convince her to read the Magic Treehouse books (since we owned the numbers in order!), but she was just not interested. She was obsessed with JUNIE B. JONES by Barbara Park instead. Her twin sister would have nothing to do with Magic Treehouse or Junie B Jones. She would only read the PRINCESS IN BLACK series by Shannon Hale 

    I decided buying books for all of my children wasn’t going to work. They are unique individuals interested in completely different books. There are times they get in a groove and read multiple books in a day. My budget can’t keep up. I would be so bold as to say, to raise an avid reader without the library would be nearly impossible. 

    Thank you to the library. We have literally checked out hundreds of books and plan to check out thousands more.