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graphic to textual

Let me start by saying there is nothing wrong with children reading graphic novels. There are a lot of wonderful graphic novels for kids and many have won critical acclaim as quality literature. We have a super graphic novel collection in the Children’s Department and for a lot of kids they first find a love of reading from graphic novels. 

But let’s face it, being good at reading graphic novels is not going to help a child get through their high school English class. At some point kids need to become comfortable reading traditional literature. I frequently have parents ask me for suggestions for getting their comic loving child to try a more traditional book format. I usually suggest a transition book that is highly illustrated but has more text than a graphic novel. Then, a reader can move from a highly illustrated book to a more text rich book.

Here are a few reading pathways starting at some popular graphic novels and leading to more text rich books. 

pathway 1

If you like: AMULET: THE STONEKEEPER
By Kazu Kibuishi
(2008)

Emily's and Narvin's mother is kidnapped and dragged into a strange and magical world where, it seems, the children's great-grandfather has been before. It's up to the children to set things right and save their mother's life.

Try (highly illustrated): DINOTOPIA
By James Gurney
(1999)

An unabridged republication of James Gurney's influential 1999 story about the adventures of Gideon Altaire. The second half of the book includes 45 new images, including never-before-published storyboards, concept sketches, and production paintings, plus new characters, stories, and backstory notes from James Gurney's creative archives.

Then (traditional format): GREGOR THE OVERLANDER
By Suzanne Collins
(2005)

When eleven-year-old Gregor and his two-year-old sister are pulled into a strange underground world, they trigger an epic battle involving men, bats, rats, cockroaches, and spiders while on a quest foretold by ancient prophecy.

 pathway 2

If you like: BIG NATE FROM THE TOP
By Lincoln Pierce
(2010)

Nate Wright is an eleven years old sixth grader who has the distinction of setting the record for school detentions.

Try (highly illustrated): DIARY OF A WIMPY KID
By Jeff Kinney
(2007)

Acclaimed debut author Jeff Kinney brilliantly re-creates the typical humor and logic of middle school boys sidling into adolescence. Sixth grader Greg Heffley doesn't understand his annoying younger brother, obnoxious older one, or well-meaning parents. But he knows enough to record his daily thoughts in a manly journal—not some girly diary. In a unique novel brimming with laugh-out-loud moments, Greg chronicles his first turbulent year of middle school.

Then (traditional format): THE TERRIBLE TWO
By Mack Barnett
2015

When master prankster Miles Murphy moves to sleepy Yawnee Valley, he challenges the local mystery prankster in an epic battle of tricks, but soon the two join forces to pull off the biggest prank ever seen.

 pathway 3

If you like: BABYMOUSE: QUEEN OF THE WORLD
By Jennifer Holm
(2005)

An imaginative mouse dreams of being queen of the world, but will settle for an invitation to the most popular girl's slumber party.

Try (highly illustrated): BABYMOUSE: TALES FROM THE LOCKER
By Jennifer Holm
(2017)

Babymouse joins the school Film Club and writes the greatest cinematic masterpiece of all time! But when the movie gets shown to the entire school, will it be a box office hit or a flop?"-- Provided by publisher.

Then (tradiational format): FROM THE NOTEBOOKS OF A MIDDLE SCHOOL PRINCESS
By Meg Cabot
(2015)

A middle-grade spinoff of The Princess Diaries, about the long-lost sister of Mia Thermopolis, Princess of Genovia.

here to help

I recently took a phone call from a library patron who was interested in learning how to use some advanced functions in Microsoft Office software (Excel, Word, etc), but taking a formal class was cost prohibitive. This patron wanted to know if we had any resources that could help them.

Oh do we have resources…

Can I just tell you? Asking a librarian what resources are available for [insert task/project/assignment here] is one of the best ways to make us love you. We want to tell you all about the amazing resources that you can use for FREE!

For this patron, I recommended four different resources:

  1. The Computer Help Lab which takes place Tuesdays and Thursdays from 2:00 – 5:00 PM in the Special Collections Room. This particular patron wasn’t available during those hours, so next I recommended…

  2. Book a Librarian. With this service the patron can request a time that suits them to meet with a librarian one-on-one to get individual help. The patron liked this idea, but was also interested in self-directed learning. So I also recommended…

  3. Learning Express Library, which has a lot of great resources that range far beyond just basic computer and Microsoft Office skills, including standardized test resources (ACT, ASVAB, GED, GMAT, GRE, LSAT, MCAT, Praxis, SAT, TOEFL, TOEIC, etc.), resources for becoming a U.S. citizen, basic math, reading, and writing resources, and so much more that this is just the tip of the ice berg.

  4. And finally, one of my favorites, Lynda.com. I don’t really know where to start when trying to describe the wealth of resources available on here. In addition to Microsoft Office courses, Lynda offers fantastic and professionally produced video courses on subjects relating to and including: 3D and animation, audio and music, business, CAD, design, courses for developers, education and e-learning, IT, marketing, photography, video, and the web.

For the Provo City Library, providing our community with access to information, instruction, and learning is central to our mission. We are here to help, and want to make sure you are aware of the amazing, FREE resources available to everyone.

The next time you come in, ask a librarian what great resources the library can offer, and watch their face light up.Just try it.

I dare you.

christmas carol1 01

Find them in the catalog: 

A CHRISTMAS CAROL illustrated by Robert Ingpen

A CHRISTMAS CAROL illustrated by P.J. Lynch

QUENTIN BLAKE'S A CHRISTMAS CAROL

football films

 It’s football season! So if you need some on-field inspiration or just a good cry (why are so many football films tearjerkers?), then here are some titles to check out at the library. *Trivia: four of the five movies listed here depict events that happened during the 1970s.

12.8 Brians SongBRIAN’S SONG
Directed by Buzz Kulik
(1971)

This movie is about the unlikely friendship between two real life Chicago Bears football players, Brian Piccolo and Gale Sayers, and the adversity that bonded them together. Pull out your hankie: This is always on top ten lists of films that make men cry. The library also has the 2002 remake.

 

12.8 We Are MarshallWE ARE MARSHALL
Directed by McG
(2006)

The incredible story of how Marshall University rebuilt their football program and helped heal the town a year after the tragedy on November 14, 1970, when the chartered jet carrying Marshall University's football team, coaches, and some fans crashed, killing all aboard. 

 

12.8 Remember the TitansREMEMBER THE TITANS 
Directed by Jerry Bruckheimer
(2000)

When a high school in Alexandria, Virginia in 1971 is integrated, white football coach Bill Yoast is demoted and replaced by African-American Herman Boone. As the two coaches overcome their differences, they help the football players overcome their resentment and build a championship team.

 

12.8 RudyRUDY 
Directed by David Anspaugh
(1993)

Rudy let no one stop him from fulfilling his dream of playing on the Notre Dame Football team even when everyone said he was too small and not good enough. You will cheer along with the crowd as Rudy gets a chance to play and makes a sack against Georgia Tech.

 

12.8 The Blind SideTHE BLIND SIDE 
Directed by John Lee Hancock
(2009)

Michael Oher is a homeless African-American teenager who is who is taken in by the Touhys, a well-to-do white family. They help him fulfill his potential on and off the field and, in return, he changes their lives for the better.

 

 

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